Music

Applicable for the 2022-2023 academic year.

Music Website

Professors BEN-AMOTS, M. GRACE, Associate Professor BAÑAGALE (chair); Assistant Professor AHARONY, CARRIZO; Artist-in-Residence S. GRACE (associate chair); Lecturers D. BRINK, LASMAWAN, REED; Visitors A. CARRIZO, HANAGAN, JIRASEK

The Music Department at Colorado College strives to be an all-inclusive place where musicians of all interests and skills can come to participate in music activities. No audition is required to enter the department, and while we offer a course of study for both music majors and minors, all students at Colorado College are eligible to attend our classes and sign-up for our ensembles. In fact, many of the 350 students who are active in the department do so only for their own pleasure.

The Department of Music invites all students to indulge their musical interests, either through participating in adjunct credit lessons and ensembles, or perhaps through an elective course to enhance a different major. Music majors and minors have a growing wealth of options available to explore their specialties in considerable depth and prepare themselves for professional careers performing, composing, producing, and teaching. Our course offerings range from general and introductory classes to specialized studies in theory, Western music history, ethnomusicology, popular music, composition, and music technology. Our faculty includes a composer, an ethnomusicologist, music historians, theorists, and world-class performers, as well as a steady stream of visiting professors and performers from many disciplines and from all corners of the globe.

Our ensemble directors preside over a wide variety of group performance opportunities, and our studio instructors offer group classes and private lessons in instruments from the classical orchestra, the concert band, world music, bluegrass, and jazz. Online registration for music lessons is available through the first two weeks of each semester; detailed information is posted on the Music website. Scholarships are available for group and private music lessons.

The department occupies Packard Hall, with its acoustically superior 300-seat concert hall, state-of-the-art recording studio and classrooms, sound-proof practice rooms, and teaching studios. The Albert Seay Memorial Library of Music and Art is a unique resource of rare books, scores, and recordings. We welcome you to join us for one of our 80+ performances each year, to sign up for a course, or to participate in making music with us, either as a major/minor, or simply for the joy of it!

Major Requirements

The music major provides students with a diverse foundation of approaches to the study, creation, and performance of music within the context of a liberal arts education. Courses are grouped primarily into three core areas, designed to introduce students to the broad approaches undertaken in the investigation of “Music in Culture” (3 units), the development of “Musicianship” skills (3 units), and the practice of “Creativity” (2 units). A set of four additional units allows individual students to follow a path of study that aligns with their musical aspirations and goals, forming “Connections” across their experience:

Core Course Requirements:

3 units of Music in Culture, one from each of the following areas (200-level and above):

  • Social Justice courses
  • Music Ethnography courses
  • Western History courses

3 units of Musicianship, one from each of the following areas:

  • Performance Oriented courses
  • Tonal Harmony (MU251) OR Musicianship (MU228)
  • Departmental Lessons and/or Ensembles (4 semesters @ .25 unit/semester)

2 units of Creativity, one from each of the following areas:

  • Composition
  • Music Technology

Connections Requirements:

  • Concert Attendance (4 semesters @ .25 unit/semester)
  • 2 units of upper-level seminars (300-level and above)
  • Junior Seminar (MU435)
  • Senior Capstone Thesis Block (MU438)

During the academic year the music department sponsors a series of performances by faculty, student ensembles, and visiting artists. Upon declaration, music majors must enroll in a .25 unit, extended-format Concert Attendance adjunct (MU216). As a part of this adjunct, majors will attend and/or perform in 8 department-approved concerts per semester to broaden their understanding of the rewards and challenges of the concert world and to gain a deeper understanding of performance practices and literature. Students will reflect upon all of this as part of the Concert Attendance adjunct.

Students will take two blocks of upper-level seminar (300-level), ideally related to their area(s) of interest and focus. These offerings emerge from each of the Music in Culture areas as well as Composition and Music Technology.

The “Senior Capstone” is a cumulative project undertaken by all majors that showcases their unique approach to music studies. The exact nature of each project will depend on the individual interests and specializations of the student, but all projects must combine both creativity and research. The process begins through participation in the Junior Seminar, where students develop a formal proposal for their thesis work. Subsequent work unfolds between the student and their respective faculty co-advisors, including at least one Senior Capstone block where students undertake focused, independent work on their projects. Some capstones may include a standalone performance or presentation, but all capstones will have two shared outcomes: a 20-minute capstone presentation at the annual Music Department Senior Colloquium and a formal final paper, the scope of which is determined between the individual student and their capstone advisors.

Departmental distinction at graduation for seniors will be awarded on the criteria of performance in departmental courses, the senior capstone project, and participation and presence in the life of the department.

MUSIC MAJOR CHECKLIST

Minor Requirements

The music minor provides students with an introduction of diverse approaches to the study, creation, and performance of music within the context of a liberal arts education. Courses are grouped into three core areas, designed to introduce students to the broad methods undertaken in the investigation of “Music in Culture” (3 units), the development of “Musicianship” skills (1 unit), and the practice of “Creativity” (1 unit). A set of two extended format “Connections” units requires individual students to take studio lessons and/or participate in ensemble activities, as well as attend department-approved concerts each semester for the duration of 2 years.

 Core Course Requirements:

3 units of Music in Culture, one from each of the following areas:

  • Social Justice courses
  • Music Ethnography courses
  • Western History courses

2 units of Musicianship, one from each of these areas:

  • Music Fundamentals (MU199) OR Musicianship and Aural Skills (MU228) OR Tonal Harmony (MU251)
  • Studio Lessons and/or Ensembles (extended format: 4 semesters @ .25 unit/semester)

1 unit of Creativity, from the following areas:

  • Composition
  • Music Technology

1 unit of Connections:

  • Concert Attendance (extended format: 4 semesters @ .25 unit/semester)

During the academic year the music department sponsors a series of performances by faculty, student ensembles, and visiting artists. Upon declaration, music minors must enroll in a .25 unit, extended-format Concert Attendance adjunct (MU216). As a part of this adjunct, minors will attend and/or perform in department-approved concerts to broaden their understanding of the rewards and challenges of the concert world and to gain a deeper understanding of performance practices and literature. Students will reflect upon all of this as part of the Concert Attendance adjunct.

  • Additional offerings are listed in the catalog of courses and should be discussed with the minor advisor.
  • Only department-approved courses can count toward the minor.
  • Only one of the introductory classes (CC100 and CC120) can count toward the minor.

MUSIC MINOR CHECKLIST

MUSIC EDUCATION

Students interested in becoming a licensed music teacher at Colorado College should major in music and minor in education.  Students can receive teaching credentials through the 9th semester program or the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program. Both require a formal application and admission process.

The list below reflects the requirements for both the music major and education minor leading to teacher licensure. All interested students need to meet with Deb Mortenson in the Education Department to talk through the possibilities for licensure.

 

MUSIC MAJOR

3 units of Music in Culture, one from each of the following areas (200-level and above):

  • Social Justice courses
  • Music Ethnography courses
  • Western History courses

 

3 units of Musicianship, one from each of the following areas:

  • Performance Oriented courses
    • MU325: CONDUCTING ^ is required for Music Ed and fulfills this Music Major requirement
  • Tonal Harmony (MU251) OR Musicianship (MU228)
  • Departmental Lessons and/or Ensembles (4 semesters @ .25 unit/semester):
    • Music Education students should fulfill this requirement by taking four semesters of large ensemble—band, orchestra, or choir: MU164: Concert Band, MU165: Chamber Orchestra, MU160: Chamber Chorus, or MU161: College Choir
  • Demonstrated piano proficiency—required for all music teachers^

 

2 units of Creativity, one from each of the following areas:

  • Composition
  • Music Technology

 

4 units of Connections Requirements, from the following areas:

  • 2 units of upper-level seminars (300-level and above)
  • Junior Seminar (MU435)
  • Senior Capstone Thesis Block (MU437/438)

 

1 unit of Concert Attendance (MU216 extended format; 4 semesters @ .25 unit/semester)

 

2 additional units of Music Education:

  • Music Learning Theories for Teaching Band and Orchestra Instruments (MU217/ED217) ^
  • Elementary Music Practicum (MU227) ^ 

 

EDUCATION MINOR (5 UNITS)                 

  • ED101: Introduction to the K-12 Classroom Culture^
  • MU217: Music Learning Theories for Teaching Band and Orchestra Instruments (this course overlaps with the education minor) ^         
  • ED222: Diversity and Equity in Education^ OR
  • ED235: Critical Multicultural Education^ OR
  • ED255: Urban Education^                            
  • ED311: Educational Psychology^
  • ED477: Culturally Responsive Teaching and Disciplinary Literacy Methods^

Music Major + Education Minor satisfies the prerequisites for the MAT program – which leads to a license and MAT


IF COMPLETING LICENSURE AS UNDERGRADUATE/9TH SEMESTER

(If applying to MAT program, these courses do not need to be taken as an undergrad – they are part of the graduate program)

  • ED478: Advanced Methods: Critical Pedagogies in Literacy, Curriculum and Instruction (2 units) ^
  • ED400: Integrating Educational Technology (0 units, proficiency based) ^
  • ED407: Topics and Issues of Special Education in the General Classroom (.25 unit) ^
  • ED408: Assessment Design and Data Driven Instruction (.25 unit) ^   
  • ED479: Teacher Candidate Practicum (3.5 units) ^      

     

^ Required by Colorado Department of Education for teacher licensure in music education

MUSIC EDUCATION CHECKLIST

Courses

Music

Meets the Critical Learning: AIM requirement. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Surveys the musical cultures of eight world areas. Develops musical vocabulary and listening skills through style description and analysis. Explores relationships between music and culture through ethnographic case studies. Introduces traditional vocal and instrumental performance techniques through workshops taught by native musicians. (Fulfills only one unit of the Social Science distribution requirement.) This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Surveys the musical cultures of eight world areas. Develops musical vocabulary and listening skills through style description and analysis. Explores relationships between music and culture through ethnographic case studies. Introduces traditional vocal and instrumental performance techniques through workshops taught by native musicians. (Fulfills only one unit of the Social Science distribution requirement.) This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2022-23).

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The International Phonetic Alphabet (I.P.A.)- a vital system which identifies each individual sound in speech- will serve as the foundation for learning the pronunciation of the four dominant languages in vocal repertoire- German, French, Italian and English. Students will gain the essential knowledge of pronunciation necessary for enhancing their appreciation of vocal art, their own performance practice, and their ongoing music and/or language studies. This adjunct course is required of all vocal performance students wishing to present a junior or senior recital. .25 units a semester.

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For the non-music major. This course will examine the socio-cultural influences on music from antiquity to modern times. The music of each period will be examined in terms of its stylistic characteristics, its performance practices and its function within the society. Selected genres, composers and musical form will be studied through directed listening sessions. Special attention will be given to the aesthetic ideas that shaped the music of each period. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Musicians, critics, and historians have struggled to define jazz for a hundred years. This introduction to the history of jazz focuses on the musical processes and cultural concerns that have come to define this genre. Emphasis on the ways that social issues such as racial segregation, discrimination and the African-American struggle for civil rights have contributed to the aesthetics and political power of jazz music. No previous experience required. Writing in the Discipline. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Mariachi Tigre was founded on CC Campus in 1999 and has seen several successful performances since. The mariachi band is open to any student wishing to play, sing, play violin, trumpet, guitar, vihuela, or guitarron. Harp and accordion players are also encouraged to join. Mariachi Tigre performs at least two concerts every year. The mariachi band is a fun way to continue to play your instruments in a new style, or it can be a great way to learn a new instrument. Mariachi Tigre rehearses every Thursday, 4:30-6:30 in Packard 9. .25 units a semester

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Develops understanding of the basic elements of music through written and aural exercises and analysis. Rudiments of music theory involving melody, rhythm, and harmony. Concentration on notation and aural recognitions of rhythm and meter, key signatures, scales, and intervals; the construction and connection of basic triads and chords; basic keyboard and sight singing skills. Designed to assist students planning to take Theory I-IV or for students interested in gaining knowledge of the musician's basic materials and skills. Cannot be used as a credit toward the music major.

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Introduction to digital sound in all three categories of composition, orchestration and musical arrangement, with primary focus on Finale Notation Software. Work in the computer lab will explore a range of possibilities that combine digital samples, multimedia, and the Internet. Students will create their own orchestral arrangements and explore new combinations of sound and rhythm in an atmosphere of experimentation and discovery. Students will print, playback and record their own music. (Not offered 2022-23).

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An introduction to the cultural and political scene of Cuba, past and present. Through a careful examination of the classical repertoire and salon music, from the 18th to the 20th Centuries, we will explore the Danzón Music as well as the various Afro-Cuban religious groups like the Santería, Palo, Abakuá and Arará. Special attention will be given to the question of the way post-revolution Cuban society deals with nationality, race, and gender issues in the arts and how ideas of a Cuban cultural identity are remodeled by the government. Finally, the course will address questions of marketing and commercializing of contemporary Cuban music as demonstrated by the enormous success of the “Buena Vista Social Club” and other movies. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

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As part of this adjunct course, majors will be attend and/or perform in 8 department-approved concerts per semester to broaden their understanding of the rewards and challenges of the concert world and to gain a deeper understanding of performance practices and literature. Students will reflect upon all of this as a part of the Concert Attendance adjunct. .25 units.

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This course introduces music learning theories foundational to teaching others how to play an instrument in the context of school, private lessons, and informal settings. The course considers how sound is produced, which motor and aural skills enhance instrumental performance, and what teaching methods improve instruction and learning. Students acquire intermediate performance skills on two band instruments and one orchestral instrument. Group practice labs, much like rehearsals, provide opportunities for students to conduct, plan, and present lessons, as well as to experience the complexity of working with multiple instruments in a heterogeneous setting. The course culminates with solo and small ensemble performances. This course is required for K-12 music teaching licensure candidates.

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Study of the methods and practices for teaching elementary music by learning about elementary general music education in school settings, planning lessons, delivering instruction, and designing assessments guided by the national and Colorado music standards. Practicum portion includes observations and participation in several elementary schools. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Special topics in ethnomusicology, approached through emphasis on a particular musical area, theoretical issue, genre or repertory, compositional technique, or instrument. The course is devoted to non-Western musical cultures. Meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Special topics in ethnomusicology, approached through emphasis on a particular musical area, theoretical issue, genre or repertory, compositional technique, or instrument. The course is devoted to non-Western musical cultures. Meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor.

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This interdisciplinary course traces the many musical traditions of the Jewish world communities in a journey from Temple singing and desert ceremonies in biblical times, through music of Mendelssohn, Mahler, and Schoenberg, to works of individuals such as Gershwin, Copland, Berlin, and Bernstein. Included will be a comparative study of the three major religions of the Western world exploring their respective voices and musical interaction. Sociology, literature, religion and history, as well as issues of ethnicity, cultural unity and self-expression, will be engaged in this multicultural search for musical identity. (Also listed as Religion 224.) May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Special topics in music history, theory, creativity, or technology. Topics vary from year to year, but typically emphasize a particular musical area, theoretical issue, genre, repertory, creative/compositional technique, or instrument.

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Special topics in music history, theory, creativity, or technology. Topics vary from year to year, but typically emphasize a particular musical area, theoretical issue, genre, repertory, creative/compositional technique, or instrument. Courses may be offered as half-block or regular-block offering.

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Music is first and foremost a sonic experience, but one that relies significantly on the visual to convey meaning. Film, television, and the internet have fundamentally changed the ways in which we experience music. This course explores the vibrant world of musical performance and how a change of venue, from the stage to the screen, affects both our experience of the musical event and our understanding of it. Some of the transformations investigated include: film adaptations of Broadway musicals; the classical canon as soundtrack and subject; popular music as music video and video games; and the live broadcast of performance into alternative sites and surroundings. (Not offered 2022-23).

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This course builds on the basic aspects of musicianship while introducing students to the harmonic language and techniques of 17th-19th century western music. Students will analyze chorals and other harmonic genres, learn to interpret figured bass, write basic four-part chord progressions according to proper voice leading rules, and be able to demonstrate these musical genres at the keyboard. A major component of this course is the development of aural skills and sight singing including intervallic and chordal quality recognition as well as melodic and rhythmic dictations. The course will cover the full scope of diatonic through Chromatic harmony, including secondary dominants, extended subdominants, special sixth chords, modulations, and simple score reading.

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Musicals stood at the center of American culture for much of the twentieth century. They not only generated tunes and tales that became the hits of their day, but also commented on the ever-shifting social and political landscape. Rather than offer a comprehensive survey, this course explores the musical artistry and cultural resonances of the American musical through a cluster of shows that confront issues of race, ethnicity, politics, immigration, and globalization. The course places an emphasis on compositional style through the development critical listening and analysis skills. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

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A creative course within an intensive hands-on environment, it serves as an introduction to concepts and methods in the intersection of music and technology. Students will work on a series of creative projects utilizing a range of techniques, with a focus on artistic applications of a digital audio workstation. The students’ creative work will be informed by a basic introduction to the fundamental theoretical context (acoustics, digital and analog audio, MIDI), as well as analytical listening, discussion, and peers’ feedback and collaboration. Topics will include digital audio, signal processing, live electronics, and basic recording techniques, including sessions at the music department’s professional recording studio. With an openness towards any form of personal musical expression, unbounded by genre or style, this course is designed to encourage experimentation and exploration, aesthetically as well as technologically. This course is open to any interested student and welcomes a diversity of backgrounds and levels of experience; no previous musical experience, digital or otherwise, is required. 1 unit. Meets the Critical Learning: CP requirement.

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How do some musicians challenge the musical, cultural, technological, and societal norms of their time? What gives rise to such challenges, and what can be their impact? The development of music in the last 100 years has been marked by numerous paths of innovation and experimentation. Some have left behind mere traces of originality and vision, while others evolved into essential features of today's musical vocabulary. In this course, students will examine a wide spectrum of key experimental musical works, through the lens of several core aesthetic elements. works explored will range from the mid-20th century American Classical -avant-garde and early pioneers of Electronic Music, through a diverse array of artists (from John Cage, Steve Reich, and Pauline Oliveros, to Public Enemy, Laurie Anderson, Radiohead, Kendrick Lamar, and others), and to today's more unconventional and envelope-pushing corners of music-making. Listening will be enhanced by a critical discussion of the works, as well as their context, impact, and potential connections to other artistic and cultural developments. Importantly, students will explore the topics covered in the course also through a series of creative projects, including assignments that involve basic digital audio editing and processing. No previous experience or musical background required. 1 unit. Meets the Critical Learning: CP requirement. (Not offered 2022-23).

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An intensive and supportive environment for the creation of original songs, unbounded by genre or style, focusing on both music and lyrics. This course welcomes a diversity of backgrounds and musical interests, and is geared towards students with some songwriting experience, whether minimal, advanced, or anything in between. It is designed for those who are motivated to grow and expand their practice; be challenged through a series of creative projects and exercises; learn through hands-on creativity, analysis, and conversation; and experiment with new approaches. The students’ creative work will be informed by feedback sessions in small groups, analytical explorations of various songs, and guest songwriter’s visits. The main focus will be on process and creative growth rather than outcome; however, the students will ultimately take part in an informal performance of their work. Meets the Critical Learning: CP requirement.

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Overview of classical and popular traditions in American music. Draws out this music's relevance to audiences of the past and of the present. Assigned listening and readings paired with source materials (such as correspondence, diary entries, and historical reviews) selected to increase understanding of a given work or historical figure. (Not offered 2022-23).

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A study of Mozart's life, character and works in the context of 18th century Europe. The course will examine each genre of music composed by Mozart and compare his works with those of his immediate predecessors and contemporaries such as Handel and Haydn. Mozart's place in 18th century society - his relationships with employers, contemporary musicians and works, family, friends, and the Masonic movement - will be examined as a context for the study of his music. No musical background is required.

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An exploration of the life and music of Ludwig van Beethoven (1771-1827). The course will begin with an overview of Beethoven's artistic inheritance from Haydn and Mozart, particularly in regard to symphonies, piano sonatas and concertos, string quartets, music for the stage, and sacred music. The powerful and daring works of Beethoven's middle period, the time of his increasing deafness, proved a challenge to this inheritance, and these compositions dominated the aesthetic concerns of the most important Western composers who followed Beethoven in the nineteenth century. The transcendental, reflective, and even puzzling works that Beethoven created in his last years - while his behavior was becoming more erratic and disturbing - were not fully appreciated by his contemporaries and immediate successors. Indeed, their artistic value and influence were not generally acknowledged until the twentieth century. This course will focus on the musical and biographical considerations that can be used to describe Beethoven as a Viennese Classical, Romantic, and post-Romantic figure, as well as his role in forming the modern concept of the performing artists and composer. No musical background is required. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Study of musical forms, styles, media and aesthetic criteria in the cultural context of the Age of Enlightenment. The emergence of the composer from artistic patronage systems into the realm of freelance employment will serve as a central theme. Particular attention will be given to Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven.

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Study of musical forms, styles, media and aesthetic criteria in the rapid and dramatic cultural changes of the ages of Romanticism and early Modernism. The rise of the composer as an individualist in the Romantic Age, and the disintegration of the traditional musical cannon at the end of the 19th Century until WWI will serve as a central theme. Special attention will be given to the music of Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Berlioz, Brahms, Wagner, Verdi, Debussy, Stravinsky and Schönberg.

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Gamelan orchestras, featuring a variety of bronze, bamboo, and wooden percussion instruments, are a global icon of Indonesian culture. This course introduces the vibrant and dynamic gamelan traditions of Bali and Central Java in historical and contemporary perspectives, surveying diverse repertories including ritual, court, village, dance, theater, and popular musics. Students learn the fundamentals of Indonesian music theory and the elements of form and design that create the distinctive sounds of gamelan music. The role of Hinduism and Islam in Indonesian musical life is discussed, along with the impact of Dutch colonization, decolonization, and tourism. Emphasis is placed on performance and creative components; students compose and perform gamelan music and participate in hands-on workshops with Indonesian musicians. The class culminates in a public performance, in which students present music learned during the course. All students are welcome; no prior musical background needed. The class is team-taught by an Indonesian musician and an ethnomusicologist. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. As a cross-listing with Anthropology, it centers on humans as producers of music, situates musical activity comparatively, and makes meaningful connections with the body of knowledge and theory of cultural anthropology. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. Meets the Critical Learning: SHB requirement.

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Practical guidance in the composition of original music, with reference to 20th century music theory and compositional methods. Students will be able to concentrate on both the creative and the analytical aspects of contemporary composition. Meets the Critical Learning: CP requirement.

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This advanced course combines the study of the ranges, capabilities, and characteristics of orchestral instruments with practical guidance in the composition of original music. Examines orchestration techniques with emphasis on the historical evolution of the orchestra, starting with the Baroque era and its basso continuo, through Classical, Romantic, and 20th-century orchestration techniques. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Harmonic practices of the late 19th century; elementary instrumentation and score-reading; keyboard harmony, ear-training, and sight-singing. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Music of the Ancient World, Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque. Forms, techniques, media, and aesthetic elements as fundamentals of style. An examination of music and music theory from classical antiquity through the middle of the 18th century, including the diffusion of early Christian chant, the rise of mainstream sacred polyphony in Paris during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the spread of sacred and secular forms during the late Middle Ages, the influence of English style on the French-Flemish composers who would dominate sacred musical style in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the appearance of important Italian composers in the late Renaissance, the national manifestations of Renaissance and early Baroque secular forms, and the international High Baroque style of Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, and Rameau. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Music of the Classical and Romantic periods, and the 20th century until 1945. Forms, techniques, media, and aesthetic elements as foundations of style. Music of the Classical era concentrating on the works of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, studied in the context of the age of Enlightenment and the freedom of the composer from patronage systems. The emergence of a romantic ideal in 19th century music with special focus on Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Berlioz, Brahms, Verdi, Wagner, nationalistic composers in Russia, and Mahler. The languages of 20th-century music as a part of rapid cultural change including the music of Debussy, Stravinsky, Schonberg, Webern, Berg, and Bartok. Note: Music History I and II do not have to be taken in sequence and credit is given for each course completed. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Semester-long, advanced-level course in instrumental or vocal performance with exposure to a wide variety of music literature, styles, and genres through experiential learning. Students receive full-hour lesson each week and perform publicly at least once during that semester, participating in Music at Midday, teacher seminars, master classes by visiting artists, and demonstrations for academic classes as appropriate. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Semester-long, advanced-level course in instrumental or vocal performance with exposure to a wide variety of music literature, styles, and genres through experiential learning. Students receive full-hour lesson each week and perform publicly at least once during that semester, participating in Music at Midday, teacher seminars, master classes by visiting artists, and demonstrations for academic classes as appropriate. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Basic conducting and rehearsal techniques; interpretation in light of performance practices of various historical periods. Some outside reading required. Taught as an extended format course and must be taken for a full year. (Not offered 2022-23).

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This upper-level course explores the roots and branches of folk music in the United States of America with an emphasis on the bluegrass tradition. Given the inherently social nature of the subject, students consider music of the past and present through a combination of oral history and performance. Co-taught by a musicologist and professional bluegrass musician, the course enables students to enhance their documentary, listening, and analytical skills, while immersing themselves in the tradition through performance. Instrumental and vocal tutorials provide both musical instruction and a sense of the development of the tradition over the course of time. Students must be able to play an acoustic instrument with basic chords and rhythm strumming. Emphasis is placed on the process of creation, including authorship, arranging, and presentation. When schedules permit, there may be a field trip to the Durango Bluegrass Meltdown or another music festival. Should such a trip take place, travel and other expenses will be covered by the department. Fulfills the Musicianship Performance Oriented Course requirement for majors. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Independent, in-depth investigation of a subject previously studied or an area of academic interest not covered in a regular departmental course. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Independent, in-depth investigation of a subject previously studied or an area of academic interest not covered in a regular departmental course. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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Thinking about music is a universal human behavior, although people from diverse musical cultures think about music in very different ways. This course investigates the fundamentals of musical thought around the world and explores alternative approaches to the analysis of world musics. Students learn about the history and methods of music notation and pitch naming systems from global perspectives and compare practices of musical transmission, musicianship, and creativity around the world. Students apply ear-training and music dictation skills to the transcription of archival recordings from Spanish New Mexico, and demonstrate competence in transcription, analysis, and research methods through an individually-designed project. Students develop critical thought by reading and discussing analytical case studies from Bali, Bulgaria, Central African Republic, China, Cuba, India, Iran, Java, Native America, and other musical cultures. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. As a cross-listing with Anthropology, it centers on humans as producers of music, situates musical activity comparatively, and makes meaningful connections with the body of knowledge and theory of cultural anthropology. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Particular topics in music that require a more advanced background in music theory and history. Specific offerings vary from year to year and focus on periods, composers, areas, or mediums that are not otherwise offered through the regular curriculum

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Particular topics in music that require a more advanced background in music theory and history. Specific offerings vary from year to year and focus on periods, composers, areas, or mediums that are not otherwise offered through the regular curriculum

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Specialized concentration in fields appropriate to the needs of the individual student, under the direction of the music faculty. May be taken by non-music majors.

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Specialized concentration in fields appropriate to the needs of the individual student, under the direction of the music faculty. May be taken by non-music majors.

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This course prepares students to successfully complete their Senior Capstone projects. Development of research topics, questions, and proposal, with emphasis on project design, exploration of secondary literature and primary sources, bibliographic construction, and format. Students will complete a formal project proposal for submission to music department faculty for approval as well as prepare research funding proposals (such as a Venture Grant) for their respective project. Capstone projects in the music department capstone project may take one of several forms, depending on the student’s interests and focus within the field of music. Students may conduct original research in ethnomusicology, music history, or music theory; they may compose or arrange a large-scale piece of music; or they may perform a public recital approximately 45 minutes in length; or some combination of these options. In all instances, students will also offer public presentations of their work as well as write a formal paper in accordance with the guidelines set forward by their advisors.

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Advanced work on the senior capstone project in music oriented towards individual student’s interest and focus. Ordinarily taken following MU 435 (Capstone Seminar).

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Advanced work on the senior capstone project in music oriented towards individual student’s interest and focus. Ordinarily taken following MU 435 (Capstone Seminar).

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Advanced individual work on the senior capstone project with emphasis on music education-oriented research or creativity. Music Education students will work with two advisors from the Music and Education departments, respectively. Capstone Projects will be presented at the annual Music Senior Colloquium. (Not offered 2022-23).

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Report an issue - Last updated: 10/27/2022