Skip to main content

Business, Economics, and Society (BESoc)

Applicable for the 2021-2022 academic year.

Business, Economics, and Society (BESoc) Website

Associate Professors: MILLER-STEVENS, RADER; Visiting Faculty: Allon, Edmonds, Grassmueck, Mann, Pierce, Reveley

MAJOR IN BUSINESS, ECONOMICS, AND SOCIETY

THE COLORADO COLLEGE

OBJECTIVES

 

The Business, Economics, and Society (BESoc) major expresses the interdisciplinary nature and commitments of the Economics and Business Department. It builds on the commonalities and the differences in the two disciplines as they study human economic behavior—its nature, its sources, and its consequences.

The major analyzes three key relationships. First, it examines the roles business and economics play within society, in particular the place of modern corporations and social enterprises in civil society and in government and economic policy. Second, it evaluates the impact of business on society, focusing on market forces, on market failures, and on services provided to all members of society. Third, it explores the effects of society on business and the economy, exploring how social issues frame business opportunities and strategies, and how corporations respond (or fail to respond) to social concerns.

By promoting knowledge of structures and processes central to democratic society in a global age, it hopes to shape effective citizens. Through this goal and through its emphasis on interdisciplinary thinking, the major contributes to the college’s commitment to the liberal arts. It also addresses issues of economic inequality and social injustice, and in so doing reinforces the college’s anti-racism agenda and its efforts to promote diversity, equity and inclusion. 

PREREQUISITES

Students desiring to major in Business, Economics, and Society (BESoc) are required to pass the following prerequisites prior to admission into the major.  If a student has not taken these courses, that student may be admitted only if currently scheduled for a later section or by consent of the chair if mitigating circumstances exist.

To get started with this (and any of our department majors), students will need our gateway courses of Principles of Economics, either as a 2-block course (EC100) or as two separate blocks (EC101 and EC102). If students already took EC201, that counts in place of the two units of Principles of Economics. Students will also need Calculus (MA125 or MA126).

EC100

EC101

EC102

Principles of Economics OR

Principles of Microeconomics AND

Principles of Macroeconomics

 2 units

BU205

Principles of Accounting

1 unit

 

 

3 units

International Baccalaureate (IB) Higher Level and Advanced Placement (AP) courses with registrar-approved test scores count as the equivalents of Economics 100, 101 and 102. Those scores, and answers to other IB and AP questions on course equivalents, can be found here: https://www.coloradocollege.edu/offices/registrar/ap-and-ib-credit.html

Major Requirements

To graduate as a Business, Economics, and Society major, students must pass the all-college requirements, while completing two units in Mathematics, a minimum of three units in Economics, three units in Business, four units in Social Issues, two units of electives, and two units of senior thesis. Only one unit total between the Social Issues core and the electives may be at the 100-level.

A.         Required Mathematics Courses (2-3 units total)

MA117

MA217

Probability & Statistics* OR

Probability and Statistical Modeling

1 unit

MA125 

MA126 

Pre-calculus & Calculus* OR

Calculus 1

1 or 2 units

 

 

2 or 3 units

 B.         Required Economics Courses (3 units total)

EC100

EC101

EC102

Principles of Economics* OR

Principles of Microeconomics* AND

Principles of Macroeconomics*

2 units

EC301

EC302

Microeconomic Theory OR

Macroeconomic Theory

1 unit

 

 

3 units

*See above guidelines on International Baccalaureate (IB and Higher Level and Advanced Placement (AP) equivalents.

C.         Required Business Courses (3 units total)

BU205

Principles of Financial Accounting

1 unit

BU329

Business Organization and Management

1 unit

BU326

BU316

BU315

Consumer Marketing OR

Theory of Business Finance OR

Business Policy and Strategy*

1 unit

 

 

3 units

* May be offered as a cross-listed co-taught course with EC344 (The Economics of Strategy)

D.        Required Social Issues Courses (4 units total)

BU311

Data, Math, and Modeling for Business and Society

1 unit

 

BU310

Society, Business, and Economics

1 unit

Two courses chosen from the Social Issues approved courses list, available on the department website.

Students may petition to count no more than 2 courses not on the Social Issues course list. Petitions must be approved before the course begins, with limited exceptions for courses already completed.

2 units

 

 

4 units

 E.         Electives (2 units total)

Two courses chosen among:

BU (Business Courses), EC (Economics courses), or Social Issues core (section D).

Only one unit total between the Social Issues core (Section D) and the electives

(Section E) may be at the 100 level.

2 units

 F.         Thesis in Business, Economics, and Society (2 units total)

 

BU499

Senior Thesis in Business, Economics, and Society

2 units

TOTAL MINIMUM REQUIRED CREDITS.....................................................................................16 units

DISTINCTION IN BUSINESS, ECONOMICS, AND SOCIETY is awarded by action of the Department to up to the top 20% of graduating majors based on their GPA within the major with the provision that they have also received an A in Senior Thesis.

Courses

Business, Economics, & Society

Selected introductory topics in economics and business. Specific content and emphasis to be determined by the instructor. Exposes students to problems and trends in society which can be illuminated through application of basic tools and concepts drawn from economics and business fields. May be taught with Emphasis on Writing and Speaking.

Read More

The study of the development and implementation of a personal financial and investment program. Includes analysis of budgeting and tax planning, managing liquidity, financing large purchases, protecting assets and income, analyzing investment information, examining alternative investment types, and investing money for retirement. There is no enrollment limit to this course and it is graded Pass/Fail only. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

An examination of the social, political and natural environment in which business operates (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Explores the processes of bargaining and negotiation, the dynamics of interpersonal and intergroup conflict, and theory and research related to processes of influence, negotiation, and conflict management. Skills will be developed through case analysis, role playing, and service learning. Includes local field trips for service learning. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

This course examines how people make decisions, drawing on the work of behavioral psychologists and behavioral economists to understand how decisions are made and why this makes a difference in addressing real world problems such as caring for the environment and for human health. Topics include framing the decision problem, making decisions under risk and uncertainty, dealing with conflicting values, forming group decisions, and improving decision making. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Survey of the U.S. system of laws and courts and the role of law in business and personal decision-making. A study of case law and judicial thinking ranging from traditional fields of contracts and torts to recent Supreme Court decisions on the environment, e-commerce, the Internet, licensing, and First Amendment freedoms

Read More

Business Communications is a survey course of communications skills needed in the business environment. Course content includes writing executive summaries, resumes, online profiles and electronic messages; delivering oral presentations, both prepared and impromptu; and developing interpersonal skills. Critical thinking and problem solving skills are emphasized. Development of these skills are integrated with the use of technology.

Read More

This course is an introduction to social entrepreneurship, a field that lies at the intersection of entrepreneurship and social change. The course identifies innovative social entrepreneurs who are attempting to mitigate problems facing humanity and our planet today. The course exposes students to theory regarding social entrepreneurship, models of social change, scaling of social impact, and impact measurement for social ventures. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

An introduction to the fundamentals of the financial statements of corporations, including statement interpretation and analysis. Exposes students to economic decisions and their consequences as they relate to business activities, including operating, investing, and financing activities. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Meets the Critical Learning: FRL requirement.

Read More

Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor.

Read More

This course analyzes the relationships between society, business, and economics by focusing on three key interactions: first, how modern corporations and social enterprises shape civil society, government, and economic policy; second, how business affects society through market forces, market failures, and services provided all members of society; and third, how social issues condition business opportunities and corporate strategies.

Read More

Students learn how to develop research questions on issues related to the intersection of business, economics, and society and to apply both business and economics theory to their analyses. Students find relevant and useful qualitative and quantitative data for their projects, develop mathematical and statistical models, practice using statistical software, create research designs to answer their research questions, and work on effective communication of their findings. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Presentation and critical review of the elements of financial statements with concentration on accounting theory and interpretation by users. Addresses problems with income determination. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Principles and problems of assembling, recording, and interpreting cost data for manufacturing and service firms. Introduces various costing systems, including activity-based and standard costing systems, with emphasis on the economic decisions managers make using this accounting data and the potential impact on employee behavior. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

The role of general managers in creating and sustaining competitive advantage. Applies microeconomic principles and organization theory to study how managers position their firms in ever-changing competitive arenas, marshal scarce resources to develop competencies, and design structures that promote learning and efficient flows of knowledge and information. 1 unit.

Read More

This course examines the role of the financial manager in determining the appropriate composition and level of assets and their financing within the context of stockholder wealth maximization. Key theoretical constructs include operating and financial leverage, the risk-return tradeoff, liquidity, and agency theory. Topics include financial analysis and planning, working capital management, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and mergers and acquisitions.

Read More

Introduction to the prevailing theories, models and philosophies of investment analysis and management for an environment where individuals make investment decisions under uncertainty. Exploration of both investment fundamentals with a brief introduction to portfolio management. Specific topics of interest include a comprehensive TVM review, fundamentals analysis, market behavior, asset allocation, portfolio theory, ethics, risk and return, and behavioral finance. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. Prerequisite: Economics 100 or Economics 101 and Economics 102 and Business 205

Read More

The analysis and segmentation of markets; the psychological, emotional, and social bases of consumer behavior; the analytical techniques employed by market research professionals; and the development, implementation, and evaluation of marketing strategies.

Read More

Explores theories of how people make decisions. Examines assumptions of rationality and alternative explanations. Applies theories to business decisions. Builds skills in experimental design, reading original research literature, building behavioral theory, executing original experimental research, and applying statistics. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

The motivation of individuals in organizations; effective goal setting practices; the sources of power in organizations and how leadership styles influence individual effort and job performance; the characteristics of effective teams, the key human resource management challenges facing organizations; and the importance of organizational culture and how organizational cultures are created.

Read More

The nonprofit sector has an economic, social, and political impact at both the domestic and international levels. This course offers a broad introduction to the history, scope, and significance of the nonprofit sector. Discussions center on different models of nonprofit firms and how they address market and government failures. Key areas of nonprofit management and leadership such as writing sound mission and vision statements, developing strong boards of directors, recruiting and motivating talented staff and volunteers, creating strategic plans and innovative programs, and wisely managing fiscal and human resources are also discussed. 1 unit. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Student readings of works selected by a faculty member on a common problem not covered directly by regular courses. Intensive research, writing, discussion, and oral reporting of ideas related to the assigned readings. Independent student work and initiative. May be taught as an extended yearlong course.

Read More

A project normally organized around preparation of a substantial paper or project. Proposed and carried out at student initiative, under supervision of a department faculty member, in an area in which the student has already completed basic coursework and an elective and that extends the student’s knowledge beyond regularly offered courses.

Read More

Students produce original research under the personal supervision of an assigned faculty member, who normally advises no more than six thesis students.

Read More

Economics

An introduction to the principles of economics (both microeconomics and macroeconomics) with emphasis on decision-making by households and firms, the way in which individual markets work, the distribution of income, governmental impact on specific markets, the behavior of economic aggregates such as total output, total employment, the price level, the rate of economic growth; and government policies which affect them.

Read More

An introduction to the principles of microeconomics with emphasis on decision-making by households and firms, the way in which individual markets work, the distribution of income, and governmental impact on specific markets. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Read More

An introduction to the principles of macroeconomics with emphasis on the behavior of economic aggregates such as total output, total employment, the price level, and the rate of economic growth; and government policies which affect them Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Read More

Selected introductory topics in economics and business. Specific content and emphasis to be determined by the instructor. Exposes students to problems and trends in society which can be illuminated through application of basic tools and concepts drawn from economics and business fields. May be taught with Emphasis on Writing and Speaking. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Social entrepreneurship is the practice of identifying, starting, and growing successful mission-driven businesses, nonprofits, and social ventures - that is, organizations that strive to advance social change through innovative solutions. This course is an introduction to social entrepreneurship, an emerging field that lies at the intersection of entrepreneurship and social change. The course will review innovative leaders who are attempting to mitigate problems facing humanity and our planet today. Course materials and activities will introduce students to characteristics of the social impact leader, philanthropy skills and knowledge, scaling of social impact, and impact measurement for social ventures. Students will discuss philanthropy and giving and the ways you might contribute your time, energy, and skills to promote health, equity, peace – whatever it is you care most about – in your life beyond this course. The class will learn the complex web of individuals and organizations that make up the social impact sector before each student works to create their own social impact plan. (Summer only 2021-22).

Read More

Investigates the concept of sustainable development by first introducing students to necessary economic terms and concepts. It next explores traditional economic models of production and distribution. Finally it introduces the concept of sustainable development (meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs). The course includes fieldwork to explore the behavior of traditional economic models and examples of sustainable development. May involve additional expense $$$. Students can choose to take this course for credit either in Economics (EC 141) or Environmental Science (EV 141) (Fulfills one unit of the divisional requirement in the Social Sciences, but not in the Natural Sciences.) (Also listed as EV 141.) (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Examines current problems in water resource management on various scales — from local to international (transboundary) supply and quality issues. Aims to demonstrate on an introductory level the value of economic analysis in the context of other approaches for thinking about water resources issues. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

The course will examine sports economics models. Students will apply theory to various aspects of both collegiate and professional sports. Topics include (but are not limited to) wage discrimination in sports, the economics of stadiums, alumni giving and collegiate athletics, academics and collegiate athletics, sports rights and broadcasting, and sports and gambling. Field trips may be included. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

This course develops: 1.) the tools necessary for the economic analysis of environmental and natural resource problems; 2.) the ability to apply those tools in the investigation of a real world environmental resource problem and; 3.) the insight to form policy recommendations on the basis of such analysis and investigation. Particular emphasis on problems of market failure, such as externalities, public goods, non-market goods, uncertainty, income distribution, inter-temporal resource allocation and policies to correct for imperfect markets.

Read More

The economic aspects of public revenues, expenditures and debt; the different types of taxes; the interrelationship between the activity of the private and public economy. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Examination of classic and modern conceptions of political economy. Emphasis on understanding theory and applying it to explain political and economic outcomes within states and among states in the international arena.

Read More

Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. 1.0 units

Read More

An advanced theory of pricing for both the product and factor markets with an emphasis on the economic behavior of: 1.) the individual; 2.) the household; 3.) the firm; and 4.) the industry.

Read More

An advanced study of business cycles and economic growth models.

Read More

The use of statistical and mathematical techniques in the applied analysis of economic models. Macro- and micro-economic applications.

Read More

Application of economic concepts to analysis of environmental problems. Development of approaches to dealing with the special problems of non-market goods. Discussion of the role of economics in policy analysis. Particular emphasis on problems of market failure, i.e., externalities, public goods, non-market goods, uncertainty, income distribution, inter-temporal resource allocation and policies to correct for imperfect markets. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

This course adds real-world complexity and analysis to the perfectly competitive model, including transaction costs, imperfect information, and barriers to entry. The course will focus on determinants of firm and market organization and behavior, and practices such as advertising, innovation, price discrimination, and strategic behavior.

Read More

Problems of employment of labor from the standpoint of employees, employers and society including the following: economic analysis of trade unions; union types, theories, policies, methods and weapons; company and union public relations, Junior standing. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Historical and economic analysis of foreign trade; theories of international trade; commercial policies and economic integration; changing patterns of trade; regional and world trade organizations. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Exploration of the field of technological change: how technologies develop and evolve; and how technologies subsequently affect our economy and society. Using case studies and journal articles as a springboard for discussion, we will apply economic concepts to events ranging from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Topics may include patent law, copyright infringement, the Green Revolution, e-commerce, health and agricultural biotechnology, and energy-related innovation. Required field study during the block, Additional expense $$$ for students. Meets the Critical Learning: CP requirement.

Read More

This course applies economic theory and data analysis in an investigation of important issues in higher education. Issues of prestige, admissions, financial aid, access, student and faculty quality, alumni giving and endowments, and externalities will be addressed (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

An examination of consequences for home and host countries of the individual/family decision to migrate.

Read More

Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Examines the economic theory and institutions of banking and other forms of financial intermediation and markets that channel savings into investment as well as the economics of financial crises, monetary policy and the government’s interaction with the financial system. Limit to be 15 when taught off campus.

Read More

What explains the current pattern of inequality of incomes between and within countries? What are the historical and contemporaneous causes of the distribution of the wealth of nations? This course gives an introduction to growth and development, focusing on the use of real-world data and theoretical and empirical research as the basis of development policies. The course aims to understand how low- and middle-income countries are institutionally, historically, or structurally different from high income countries, to learn and deploy theories and models of economic development and to understand policies that have been effective in dealing with particular problems affecting developing countries.

Read More

This course utilizes economic theory to enable students to both understand and analyze the role of economic policy in the national arenas of Latin America. The course begins with an introduction to the global economic environment, the historical background of Latin America and the economic emergence of the region. The course focuses on several aspects of trade policy and regional agreements, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and their impact on the international policy environment, framing the analysis of these microeconomic and macroeconomic issues in the context of Latin America. The course will also address current events, both domestic and international, which are particularly relevant for the economic viability of the region. The purpose of the course is to understand the economic context and environment of policymaking in Latin America, as well as the impact on the different actors: workers, firms, the environment, political institutions. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Historical and economic analysis of international financial arrangements; theories of foreign exchange, balance of payments and adjustment mechanisms; alternative world monetary systems in theory and practice; proposals for monetary reform; regional and world financial organization.

Read More

Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor

Read More

The use of advanced statistical and mathematical techniques in the analysis of economic models Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Read More

Selected topics in the study of Mathematical Economics. Specific content and emphasis are developed by the instructor(s). Topics will meet the ME elective requirement for the Mathematical Economics major. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

This course provides the student with the mathematical tools to explore the economic models of addiction. The course begins by exploring static demand-side models of addiction before proceeding to their dynamic counterparts. The course will rely on journal articles that explore the demand for addictive substances such as alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and cocaine. Also explored are models that treat gambling and sports spectatorship as addictive behaviors. A limited discussion of supply-side models is also included. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Game Theory offers a framework for studying strategic interactions in a wide variety of circumstances. Most economics and business courses explore the nature of choice by individuals -- be those consumers or firms or even countries. The interdependence among decision-makers is usually captured as a constraint on the activities of the individual. Game theory broadens that perspective by allowing the agent to be aware of and to interact with other agents in dynamic and complex ways. We will set up and solve strategic and sequential form games and evaluate the quality of those outcomes. We will also consider multi-player interactions under conditions of uncertainty.

Read More

Exogenous and endogenous growth models and the effect of policy variables (functions) such as education, technical progress, and taxes on economic growth. Analysis of steady state equilibrium and convergence in levels and growth rates. Cross-sectional and panel data models of economic growth. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Student readings of works selected by a faculty member on a common problem not covered directly by regular courses. Intensive research, writing, discussion, and oral reporting of ideas related to the assigned readings. Independent student work and initiative. May be taught as an extended year-long course.

Read More

A project normally organized around preparation of a substantial paper or project. Proposed and carried out at student initiative, under supervision of a department faculty member, in an area in which the student has already completed basic coursework and an elective and that extends the student’s knowledge beyond regularly offered courses.

Read More

Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor.

Read More

Students produce original research under the personal supervision of an assigned faculty member. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Cooperation between advanced students and faculty on an individual basis to jointly pursue research on a selected topic. The student will be responsible for a share of the research, discussion of the findings and significance, and preparation of a paper reflecting the procedures and findings of the investigation. May be taught as an extended year-long course.

Read More

Focuses on the economic interactions among countries as nation states to pursue their interests as well as the role of international institutions and multilateral treaties in establishing an international economic regime. Students write a substantial paper exploring some aspect of this interaction, and have considerable freedom in defining their research agenda. (Also listed as PS 470.) (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

A travel and research opportunity on selected economics, business or political economy topics intended to provide a learning experience in an off-campus setting. Additional prerequisites determined by the instructor relevant to the selected topic. May involve additional expense $$$. Enrollment limit based on resources available for the selected topic. (Not offered 2021-22).

Read More

Students produce original research under the personal supervision of an assigned faculty member, who normally advises no more than six thesis students.

Read More

Students produce original research under the personal supervision of an assigned faculty member, who normally advises no more than six thesis students.

Read More

Students produce original research under the personal supervision of an assigned faculty member, who normally advises no more than six thesis students.

Read More

Report an issue - Last updated: 08/02/2021