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    Support is available 24/7

    Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC)
    Anna Thompson

    Worner 219
    office (M-F 9-5): (719) 227-8101
    amthompson@coloradocollege.edu 
    sarc@coloradocollege.edu

    After Hours
    SARC On-Call: (719) 602-0960
    Counselor On-Call: (719) 389-6093, press 2

    Medical and Legal Options

    Medical Options

    If you know that you wish to have medical evidence collected and receive medical services, you can go directly to the Memorial Hospital Emergency Room for this process.  When you arrive in the ER, tell the intake nurse that you are requesting a SANE (Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners) exam.  The CC SARC can also help transport you to Memorial and support you through this process.

    It is extremely important for survivors of sexual assault and intimate partner violence to get supportive services as quickly as possible following an assault.  A primary concern is physical safety and health. There are a number of resources for medical services available to students, and you can speak with the SARC for assistance in accessing these services, if desired.  Consider getting medical attention - the SARC can accompany you to the ER and support you throughout the process of getting treated and receiving a medical forensic exam.  Victims of sexual assault and intimate partner violence should consider getting medical treatment for the following reasons:

    • To treat any injuries that may have occurred during the assault.  Even if you do not think that you are injured, you may have sustained injuries like bruising, lacerations, or internal injuries, particularly if you were forced to have vaginal or anal intercourse.
    • To obtain emergency contraception (used to prevent pregnancy within 72 hours of unprotected penile/vaginal assault) and/or antibiotics (to prevent sexually transmitted infection).
    • Collection of forensic evidence which may be used later if you decide to report to law enforcement.  Once collected, the evidence will be held for two years, so you have time to decide whether you wish to pursue charges. Having medical evidence may improve the strength of your case.
      • The medical forensic exam is administered by a specially trained Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner who is trauma-informed and knowledgeable about victims’ needs.
      • You should not bathe, douche, change clothes, or brush teeth.  This will help preserve evidence in the event you decide to pursue charges.  If you have changed clothing, it is best to bring the clothes that you were wearing at the time (or immediately after) the assault.

    Medical care is also available at the following locations:

    Legal Options

    RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network) keeps up to date information on states' laws and definitions around sexual and gender-based violence. For more information on Colorado's policies, click here. If you suspect you have been the victim of a crime, CC has resources to assist you in reporting to law enforcement. For example, Campus Safety can help you arrange a neutral meeting for initial contact with the police.

    Campus Safety's website also has information about how CC complies with the Clery Act of 1990, which sets legal standards for how college campuses keep records of and disseminate information about crimes and other emergencies that happen on campus. Rape and other sexual offenses are among the crimes that the college is required to report to the federal government. Confidential information from the SARC is reported in the aggregate and included in Campus Safety's annual report. No identifying information is ever included. 

    In Colorado, victims receiving medical care have multiple legal options. They can choose whether or not to report to law enforcement and have a medical forensic exam completed. If they do have the SANE medical forensic exam done, the three reporting options are:

    • Law Enforcement Report: Victim chooses to obtain a medical forensic exam and to work with law enforcement.
    • Medical Report: Victim chooses to have the medical forensic exam, but at the time of exam chooses not to follow up with law enforcement. Law enforcement holds evidence collected from the exam with the individual’s contact information. Victims can choose whether to have exam tested or not and the law enforcement agency will hold the evidence for at least 2 years. Victims can contact law enforcement agency at a later date should they decide to pursue criminal justice options.
    • Anonymous Report: Victim chooses to have the medical forensic exam, but at the time of exam chooses not to follow up with law enforcement. Law enforcement holds evidence collected from the exam without the individual’s contact information. Victims cannot choose whether to have exam tested or not and the law enforcement agency will store the evidence kit for at least 2 years. Victims can contact law enforcement agency at a later date should they decide to pursue criminal justice options.