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Mathematical Economics

Applicable for the 2020-2021 academic year.

Mathematical Economics Website

Advisers: Professor BROWN (Mathematics), ERICKSON (Mathematics), FENN (Economics); Associate Professor DE ARAUJO (Economics)

Students majoring in mathematical economics must successfully complete no fewer than 16 units of listed courses in mathematics (MA) and economics (EC), including a senior thesis. To solidify basic problem solving skills, all majors must initially take a common set of required courses in economic theory and mathematics. Majors then select electives in more advanced topics of mathematics and economics, before writing a senior thesis. The major provides strong training for students pursuing private sector careers in investment banking, forecasting, applied mathematics, or finance, as well as graduate work in economics, operations research, and financial engineering.

Major Requirements

The Major

Students desiring to major in mathematical economics are required to pass the following prerequisites prior to admission into the major.  If a student has not taken all three of these courses, that student may be admitted only if currently scheduled for a later section or by consent of the chair if mitigating circumstances exist.          

MA 125 or 126 – Calculus 1

1 unit

MA 129 – Calculus 2 

1 unit

EC 201 – Economic Theory  

1 unit

Notice that while International Baccalaureate (IB) Higher Level and Advanced Placement (AP) courses may count toward college credit as the equivalents of Economics 100, 101 and/or 102, they will not substitute for Economics 201, a course which uses calculus as a fundamental tool of the discipline.

To graduate as a mathematical economics major, students must pass the all-college requirements, while completing major components consisting of 10 units of required courses, four units of electives, and two units of senior thesis for a total of 16 units in the major.

A. Required Courses (10 units total)

            Math (6 Units)

 MA 125 or 126

Calculus 1 or equivalent as approved by Math Department

1 unit

 MA 129

Calculus 2 or equivalent as approved by Math Department

1 unit

 MA 204

Calculus 3 or equivalent

1 unit

 MA 217

Probability and Statistical Modeling

1 unit

 MA 220

Linear Algebra

1 unit

 MA 315

Ordinary Differential Equations

1 unit

 

6 units

 Please note that Calculus 2 (MA 129) is a prerequisite for Linear Algebra (MA 220); and Calculus 3 (MA 204) and Linear Algebra (MA 220) are prerequisites for Differential Equations (MA 315).

 

            Economics (4 Units)

 EC 201

Economic Theory 1

1 unit

 EC 301

Microeconomic Theory II

1 unit

 EC 302

Macroeconomic Theory II

1 unit

 EC 403

Econometric Theory

1 unit

 

4 units

           

B. Electives (4 units total)

1. Economics elective  

At least one elective from the following list, or other as approved in advance by the chair of the Department of Economics and Business. 

 EC 317

Investments

1 unit

 EC 343

Environmental Economics II

 EC 344

Industrial Organization

 EC 346

Economics of Labor

 EC 347

Economics of International Trade

 EC 371

Money, Banking, and Financial Markets

 EC 372

Economic Development

 EC 377

Economics of International Finance

      2. Mathematics elective   

At least one elective from the following list, or other as approved in advance by the chair of the Department of Mathematics.                  

 MA 313

Probability

1 unit

 

 MA 325

Graph Theory (2 units*)

 MA 340

Topics in Mathematics:  Mathematical Modeling

 MA 375

Real Analysis I (2 units*)

 MA 416

Partial Differential Equations

 MA 417

Mathematical Statistics

 MA 418

Numerical Analysis

      3. Mathematical Economics elective   

At least one elective from the following list, or other as approved in advance by the chair of the Department of Economics.

 EC 404

 Advanced Topics in Mathematical Economics

1 unit

 EC 405

Mathematical Economics of Addiction

 EC 406

Mathematical Economics of Game Theory

 EC 407

Mathematical Economics of Growth

                   

        4. Additional Mathematical Economics or Mathematics elective       

 

 At least one additional elective from either:

 the mathematics electives (part B #2) or

 mathematical economics electives (part B #3) category.

1 unit

                              

 

 

 

*Both Real Analysis I (MA 375) and Graph Theory (MA 325) count as 2 units towards the major-satisfying requirements #2 and #4       under part B.

C. EC 496 - Senior Thesis in Mathematical Economics (2 units total)

DISTINCTION IN MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS is awarded by action of both departments (math and economics/business) to up to the top 20 percent of graduating majors based on their GPA within the major with the provision that they have also received an A in Senior Thesis.

Courses

Economics

An introduction to the principles of economics (both microeconomics and macroeconomics) with emphasis on decision-making by households and firms, the way in which individual markets work, the distribution of income, governmental impact on specific markets, the behavior of economic aggregates such as total output, total employment, the price level, the rate of economic growth; and government policies which affect them.

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An introduction to the principles of microeconomics with emphasis on decision-making by households and firms, the way in which individual markets work, the distribution of income, and governmental impact on specific markets. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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An introduction to the principles of macroeconomics with emphasis on the behavior of economic aggregates such as total output, total employment, the price level, and the rate of economic growth; and government policies which affect them Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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Selected introductory topics in economics and business. Specific content and emphasis to be determined by the instructor. Exposes students to problems and trends in society which can be illuminated through application of basic tools and concepts drawn from economics and business fields. May be taught with Emphasis on Writing and Speaking. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Social entrepreneurship is the practice of identifying, starting, and growing successful mission-driven businesses, nonprofits, and social ventures - that is, organizations that strive to advance social change through innovative solutions. This course is an introduction to social entrepreneurship, an emerging field that lies at the intersection of entrepreneurship and social change. The course will review innovative leaders who are attempting to mitigate problems facing humanity and our planet today. Course materials and activities will introduce students to characteristics of the social impact leader, philanthropy skills and knowledge, scaling of social impact, and impact measurement for social ventures. Students will discuss philanthropy and giving and the ways you might contribute your time, energy, and skills to promote health, equity, peace – whatever it is you care most about – in your life beyond this course. The class will learn the complex web of individuals and organizations that make up the social impact sector before each student works to create their own social impact plan. (Summer only 2021-22).

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Investigates the concept of sustainable development by first introducing students to necessary economic terms and concepts. It next explores traditional economic models of production and distribution. Finally it introduces the concept of sustainable development (meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs). The course includes fieldwork to explore the behavior of traditional economic models and examples of sustainable development. May involve additional expense $$$. Students can choose to take this course for credit either in Economics (EC 141) or Environmental Science (EV 141) (Fulfills one unit of the divisional requirement in the Social Sciences, but not in the Natural Sciences.) (Also listed as EV 141.) (Not offered 2021-22).

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Examines current problems in water resource management on various scales — from local to international (transboundary) supply and quality issues. Aims to demonstrate on an introductory level the value of economic analysis in the context of other approaches for thinking about water resources issues. (Not offered 2021-22).

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The course will examine sports economics models. Students will apply theory to various aspects of both collegiate and professional sports. Topics include (but are not limited to) wage discrimination in sports, the economics of stadiums, alumni giving and collegiate athletics, academics and collegiate athletics, sports rights and broadcasting, and sports and gambling. Field trips may be included. (Not offered 2021-22).

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This course develops: 1.) the tools necessary for the economic analysis of environmental and natural resource problems; 2.) the ability to apply those tools in the investigation of a real world environmental resource problem and; 3.) the insight to form policy recommendations on the basis of such analysis and investigation. Particular emphasis on problems of market failure, such as externalities, public goods, non-market goods, uncertainty, income distribution, inter-temporal resource allocation and policies to correct for imperfect markets.

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The economic aspects of public revenues, expenditures and debt; the different types of taxes; the interrelationship between the activity of the private and public economy. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Examination of classic and modern conceptions of political economy. Emphasis on understanding theory and applying it to explain political and economic outcomes within states and among states in the international arena.

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Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. 1.0 units

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An advanced theory of pricing for both the product and factor markets with an emphasis on the economic behavior of: 1.) the individual; 2.) the household; 3.) the firm; and 4.) the industry.

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An advanced study of business cycles and economic growth models.

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The use of statistical and mathematical techniques in the applied analysis of economic models. Macro- and micro-economic applications.

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Application of economic concepts to analysis of environmental problems. Development of approaches to dealing with the special problems of non-market goods. Discussion of the role of economics in policy analysis. Particular emphasis on problems of market failure, i.e., externalities, public goods, non-market goods, uncertainty, income distribution, inter-temporal resource allocation and policies to correct for imperfect markets. (Not offered 2021-22).

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This course adds real-world complexity and analysis to the perfectly competitive model, including transaction costs, imperfect information, and barriers to entry. The course will focus on determinants of firm and market organization and behavior, and practices such as advertising, innovation, price discrimination, and strategic behavior.

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Problems of employment of labor from the standpoint of employees, employers and society including the following: economic analysis of trade unions; union types, theories, policies, methods and weapons; company and union public relations, Junior standing. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Historical and economic analysis of foreign trade; theories of international trade; commercial policies and economic integration; changing patterns of trade; regional and world trade organizations. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Exploration of the field of technological change: how technologies develop and evolve; and how technologies subsequently affect our economy and society. Using case studies and journal articles as a springboard for discussion, we will apply economic concepts to events ranging from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Topics may include patent law, copyright infringement, the Green Revolution, e-commerce, health and agricultural biotechnology, and energy-related innovation. Required field study during the block, Additional expense $$$ for students.

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This course applies economic theory and data analysis in an investigation of important issues in higher education. Issues of prestige, admissions, financial aid, access, student and faculty quality, alumni giving and endowments, and externalities will be addressed (Not offered 2021-22).

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An examination of consequences for home and host countries of the individual/family decision to migrate.

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Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Examines the economic theory and institutions of banking and other forms of financial intermediation and markets that channel savings into investment as well as the economics of financial crises, monetary policy and the government’s interaction with the financial system. Limit to be 15 when taught off campus.

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Examines various attempts by Third World countries to achieve higher standards of living; emphasizes the theoretical and policy approaches adopted in both the domestic and international spheres. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

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This course utilizes economic theory to enable students to both understand and analyze the role of economic policy in the national arenas of Latin America. The course begins with an introduction to the global economic environment, the historical background of Latin America and the economic emergence of the region. The course focuses on several aspects of trade policy and regional agreements, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and their impact on the international policy environment, framing the analysis of these microeconomic and macroeconomic issues in the context of Latin America. The course will also address current events, both domestic and international, which are particularly relevant for the economic viability of the region. The purpose of the course is to understand the economic context and environment of policymaking in Latin America, as well as the impact on the different actors: workers, firms, the environment, political institutions. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Historical and economic analysis of international financial arrangements; theories of foreign exchange, balance of payments and adjustment mechanisms; alternative world monetary systems in theory and practice; proposals for monetary reform; regional and world financial organization.

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Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor

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The use of advanced statistical and mathematical techniques in the analysis of economic models Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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Selected topics in the study of Mathematical Economics. Specific content and emphasis are developed by the instructor(s). Topics will meet the ME elective requirement for the Mathematical Economics major. (Not offered 2021-22).

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This course provides the student with the mathematical tools to explore the economic models of addiction. The course begins by exploring static demand-side models of addiction before proceeding to their dynamic counterparts. The course will rely on journal articles that explore the demand for addictive substances such as alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and cocaine. Also explored are models that treat gambling and sports spectatorship as addictive behaviors. A limited discussion of supply-side models is also included. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Game Theory offers a framework for studying strategic interactions in a wide variety of circumstances. Most economics and business courses explore the nature of choice by individuals -- be those consumers or firms or even countries. The interdependence among decision-makers is usually captured as a constraint on the activities of the individual. Game theory broadens that perspective by allowing the agent to be aware of and to interact with other agents in dynamic and complex ways. We will set up and solve strategic and sequential form games and evaluate the quality of those outcomes. We will also consider multi-player interactions under conditions of uncertainty.

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Exogenous and endogenous growth models and the effect of policy variables (functions) such as education, technical progress, and taxes on economic growth. Analysis of steady state equilibrium and convergence in levels and growth rates. Cross-sectional and panel data models of economic growth. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Student readings of works selected by a faculty member on a common problem not covered directly by regular courses. Intensive research, writing, discussion, and oral reporting of ideas related to the assigned readings. Independent student work and initiative. May be taught as an extended year-long course.

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A project normally organized around preparation of a substantial paper or project. Proposed and carried out at student initiative, under supervision of a department faculty member, in an area in which the student has already completed basic coursework and an elective and that extends the student’s knowledge beyond regularly offered courses.

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Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor.

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Students produce original research under the personal supervision of an assigned faculty member. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Selected topics, with content and emphasis developed by the instructor. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Cooperation between advanced students and faculty on an individual basis to jointly pursue research on a selected topic. The student will be responsible for a share of the research, discussion of the findings and significance, and preparation of a paper reflecting the procedures and findings of the investigation. May be taught as an extended year-long course.

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Focuses on the economic interactions among countries as nation states to pursue their interests as well as the role of international institutions and multilateral treaties in establishing an international economic regime. Students write a substantial paper exploring some aspect of this interaction, and have considerable freedom in defining their research agenda. (Also listed as PS 470.) (Not offered 2021-22).

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A travel and research opportunity on selected economics, business or political economy topics intended to provide a learning experience in an off-campus setting. Additional prerequisites determined by the instructor relevant to the selected topic. May involve additional expense $$$. Enrollment limit based on resources available for the selected topic. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Students produce original research under the personal supervision of an assigned faculty member, who normally advises no more than six thesis students.

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Students produce original research under the personal supervision of an assigned faculty member, who normally advises no more than six thesis students.

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Students produce original research under the personal supervision of an assigned faculty member, who normally advises no more than six thesis students.

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Mathematics

An introduction to mathematical thinking through specified topics drawn from number theory, geometry, graph theory, algebra or combinatorics. The course will focus on giving students the opportunity to discover mathematics on their own. No previous mathematical background is required, but students will be expected to come with curiosity and a willingness to experiment. Not recommended for math majors. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement.

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An introduction to the ideas of probability, including counting techniques, random variables and distributions. Elementary parametric statistical tests with examples drawn from the social sciences and life sciences. Not recommended for mathematics majors. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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Skillful teaching of mathematics requires the teacher to understand the material from a variety of perspectives, and with greater depth than his or her students. This course helps to prepare future elementary teachers by exploring some of the deeper structure of elementary mathematics. Topics will include: counting and cardinality, ratio and proportional relationships, elementary number theory, operations and algebraic thinking, and the role of axioms, deduction, examples, and counterexamples. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Not offered 2021-22).

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This course covers the same material as MA126 together with one block of content from algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry and the study of functions. Intended solely for students not sufficiently prepared for MA126. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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Differential and integral calculus of algebraic and transcendental functions and applications. Students normally begin the calculus sequence with this course. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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An accelerated review of differential and integral calculus of one variable, including a study of the differential calculus for functions of several variables. Designed for students who have already been exposed to topics traditionally included in two semesters of calculus. MA 127 fulfills all requirements met by MA 129; no credit after MA 128 or MA 129. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Techniques of integration, applications of the definite integral, differential equations, Taylor polynomials, vectors in two and three dimensions, differential calculus of functions of several variables. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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Basic overview of viral infections, symptoms, mutations, and viral life cycles, and how politics, history, and culture can affect the spread of viral epidemics. Second block will provide a meaningful research experience using techniques from differential calculus to model viral epidemics and provide a deeper understanding of how calculus-based ideas fit into a biological context. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Not offered 2021-22).

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People have been writing numbers for as long as they have been writing. This course traces the use of numbers from ancient civilizations to modern times and examines how our view of numbers has changed over that period: natural numbers, prime numbers, rational numbers, Fibonacci numbers, real numbers and complex numbers, as well as the way in which our ability to calculate has evolved. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Not offered 2021-22).

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People have been writing numbers for as long as they have been writing. This course traces the use of numbers from ancient civilizations to modern times and examines how our view of numbers has changed over that period: natural numbers, prime numbers, rational numbers, Fibonacci numbers, real numbers and complex numbers, as well as the way in which our ability to calculate has evolved. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Traces the evolution of geometry and dynamics from antiquity to the present, while following the thread of developing technology . Geometry in Euclid’ s time and Aristotle’ s dynamics are inadequate for the study of natural objects such as fern leaves or the weather . Examines how the development of calculating machines has affected and deepened understanding of the natural world. Following the development of early calculating machines into modern day computers, we will see how Newton’ s and Leibniz’ s calculus laid the foundations for the study of differential equations, chaotic and nonlinear dynamics, fractals, and the butterfly effect. First Y ear Experience course; first year students only . Prerequisite: Calculus 1 from high school, or COI (Not offered 2021-22).

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An introduction to combinatorics, graph theory, and combinatorial geometry. The topics are fundamental for the study of many areas of mathematics as well as for the study of computer science, with applications to cryptography, linear programming, coding theory, and the theory of computing. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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Opportunity to study new mathematical ways of thinking in a cultural context. Much like the division between plants and animals in biology, mathematics can be divided into continuous mathematics (e.g. calculus) and discrete mathematics, the latter of which is the subject of this course. Includes concepts that are fundamental to modern mathematics and computer science. We will also introduce mathematics with important applications to the social sciences. Mathematical topics will be illuminated by examining their treatment in a variety of non-Western cultures, both historical and traditional. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Sequences and infinite series, non-Cartesian coordinate systems, integral calculus for functions of several variables, and the calculus of vector valued functions. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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Introduction to probability distribution theory and statistical inference. Descriptive methods for building models with emphasis on linear regression models including variance and covariance. Analysis of model fit and discussion of modern robust techniques. (This course is an appropriate first course in statistics for students with stronger mathematical backgrounds.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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This course will focus on the fundamentals of exploratory data analysis, hypothesis testing, and experimental design in the ecological, environmental, and the earth sciences. Topics will include theory and practice of project design, data distribution and description, the central limit theorem, characterization of uncertainty, correlation, univariate hypothesis testing, and multivariate analyses (ANOVA, linear regression). Students will complete a final project using environmental data collected in the field and analyzed using statistical computer software. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Matrix algebra and Gaussian elimination. The geometry of vectors in R2, R3 and Rn. Vector spaces and linear transformation. Introduction to orthogonal geometry and eigenvalue problems. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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An introduction to one of the major mathematical software packages such as Mathematica or Matlab. Investigation of symbolic computation, numerical algorithms, and graphics as used in these programs. Students may take the course more than once to learn additional software packages, but they may take it a maximum of two times for credit. (May be taught either in the extended format or as a half-block.) (Not offered 2021-22).

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Students will meet regularly during the semester, in order to learn problem solving techniques as applied to interesting mathematical problems, often drawn from the national William Lowell Putnam competition, or the COMAP Mathematical Modeling Contest. Students may take the course more than once, but at most two times for credit (in different years). Pass/Fail grade only. .5 units (Not offered 2021-22).

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This course will provide a forum for discussing current research and classic papers in mathematical biology. Topics will be chosen that both relate to students' research experiences and broaden their knowledge of mathematical biology. The seminar will also provide a forum for discussing research with visiting scientists. It will meet twice per block for one semester. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Special topics in mathematics not offered on a regular basis.

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A careful study of major topics in elementary number theory, including divisibility, factorization, prime numbers, perfect numbers, congruences, Diophantine equations and primitive roots. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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A careful study of major topics in elementary number theory, including divisibility, factorization, prime numbers, perfect numbers, congruences, Diophantine equations and primitive roots. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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An introduction to selected quantitative models drawn from areas of biology such as ecology, genetics and physiology. For each model, the course includes an investigation of the mathematical methods, an evaluation of the model, and some elementary simulation techniques. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

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Some current topics in advanced and modern geometry. Topics drawn from linear geometry, affine, inversive and projective geometries, foundations and axiomatics, transformation groups, geometry of complex numbers. (Offered alternate years.)

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Vector functions, divergence and curl, Green's and Stokes' theorems, and the properties of three-dimensional curves and surfaces. Related topics from linear algebra and differential equations. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Probability spaces, discrete and continuous random variables, independence, expectation, distribution functions

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Ordinary Differential Equations. Introduction to methods for finding solutions to differential equations involving a single, independent variable. Topics include linear equations, exact solutions, series solutions. Laplace transforms, Sturm Separation and Comparison Theorems, systems of equations, and existence and uniqueness theorems.

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An introduction to the abstract algebraic properties of groups, rings and fields.

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A study of graphs as finite mathematical structures. Emphasis on algorithms, optimization and proofs. (Offered alternate years.)

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Special topics in mathematics not offered on a regular basis.

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An introduction to the nature of mathematical research. Investigation with a faculty member of current mathematical problems, usually chosen from the field of the faculty member's own research. (Offered in alternate years. May be offered some years as an extended format course for 1/2 unit.) (Not offered 2021-22).

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An introduction to the nature of mathematical research. Investigation with a faculty member of current mathematical problems, usually chosen from the field of the faculty member's own research. (Offered in alternate years. May be offered some years as an extended format course for 1/2 unit.) (Not offered 2021-22).

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An introduction to the theoretical basis for the calculus, with an emphasis on rigorous proof. Properties of the real number system; sequences and series; continuity; elementary topology of the real line, Euclidean space and metric spaces; compactness; pointwise and uniform convergence.

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Selected topics in the study of Mathematical Economics. Specific content and emphasis are developed by the instructor(s). Topics will meet the ME elective requirement for the Mathematical Economics major. (Not offered 2021-22).

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An introduction to the study of point-set topology. Examples of topological spaces; compactness, connectedness, and continuity; separation axioms. Additional topics chosen from algebraic or geometric topology. (Offered alternate years.) (Not offered 2021-22).

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A study of selected developments in the history of mathematics and the role of mathematics in different cultures across time. The course often draws on original sources and traces the relationships among different fields within mathematics through the in-depth study of major unifying results. When used to fulfill the capstone requirement for the mathematics department, the course must be taken in the senior year.

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The calculus of functions of a complex variable. Differentiation, contour integration, power-series, residue theory and applications, conformal mapping and applications.

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Introduction to analytical and numerical methods for finding solutions to differential equations involving two or more independent variables. Topics include linear partial differential equations, boundary and initial value problems, Fourier series solutions, finite element methods, the Laplace equation, the wave equation and the heat equation.

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Brief introduction of probability, descriptive statistics, classical and Bayesian statistical inference, including point and interval estimation, hypothesis tests and decision theory. (Offered alternate years.)

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The development and analysis of algorithms for approximating solutions to mathematical problems. Topics covered include: approximating functions, finding roots, approximating derivatives and integrals, solving differential equations, solving systems of linear equations, and finding eigenvalues. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Continuation of Mathematics 321. Topics may include Galois theory, commutative algebra, computational algebra, representations of finite groups, or algebraic geometry.

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Given on demand for a group of students interested in a topic not included in the regular curriculum. (Not offered 2021-22).

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Continuation of Mathematics 375. A rigorous treatment of derivatives and integrals of a single variable. Other topics, chosen by the instructor, may include a rigorous approach to multivariable calculus; the implicit and inverse function theorems; analysis on manifolds; dynamical systems; measure theory and the Lebesgue integral; functional analysis.

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Advanced work in mathematics on the senior capstone project. Required for all students who are completing their capstone experience through a yearlong project and working towards the required summary seminar and summary paper. This course should be taken in the senior year, during or before Block 6

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Report an issue - Last updated: 03/02/2021