English

Applicable for the 2023-2024 academic year.

English Website

Professors BUTTE (fall sabbatical), EVITT, GARCIA, HAYWARD, HILBERRY, LOVE, RICHMAN; Associate Professors GOLDBERG (on sabbatical), PULLEY (chair); Assistant Professors LO (fall sabbatical), SHIMODA.

Major Requirements

Literature Track

A student majoring in English on the literature track must satisfactorily complete at least 11 units. Students may use single courses to fulfill two requirements in the major in categories 2 and 3. Students must take at least two courses at the 300 level (not including the Junior Seminar). Courses taken outside the English Department may count as electives towards the major with the approval of the English Department Curriculum Committee.

  1. Gateway courses (2 units, both required):
    1. EN100 Introduction to Literature: or EN221 Introduction to Poetry
    2. EN250 Introduction to Literary Theory
  2. Foundations and Transformations courses (2 units, 1 unit of each required; 1 must be taken at the 300 level; may be taken outside the Department of English):
    1. American Ethnic Minority Literature (including but not limited to EN251, EN252, EN277, EN295, EN296, EN297, EN298, EN385, EN387).
    2. Anglophone and Other National Literatures: Caribbean Literature, Postcolonial Literature, African Literature (e.g. EN270, EN272, EN373, EN375), literature courses in Classics, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Spanish (in translation or in the original language—list is not comprehensive; excludes Canadian, Irish, Welsh, and Scottish literatures)
  3. Historical Period courses (3 units; 2 out of 3 must be taken at the 300 level):
    1. Medieval/Renaissance (EN202, EN220, EN225, EN310, EN311, EN312, EN313, EN320, EN321, EN326, EN328, EN329). 
    2. 18th and 19th Centuries (EN290, EN350, EN352, EN360, EN362, EN365, EN370, EN371, EN372, EN391, EN394)
    3. 20th and 21st Centuries (EN230, EN240, EN251, EN252, EN254, EN259, EN270, EN275, EN277, EN295, EN296, EN297, EN298, EN330, EN372, EN373, EN382, EN383, EN385, EN386, EN395, EN397, EN398). 
  4. Electives (3 units, required, at any level): courses in literature/creative writing, any topic/genre at any level. Up to two units may be in creative writing. One unit may be fulfilled outside the English Department with the consent of the English Department Curriculum Committee.
  5. Junior/Senior Sequence (3 units, required):
    1. EN399 Junior Seminar (1 unit; this requirement may be fulfilled simultaneously with one requirement in groups 2 or 3).
    2. Senior Sequence (2 units): EN480 Senior Seminar: Literature followed by EN499 Senior Project: Independent Thesis (students may take up to 2 units of EN499).

Students may use no more than two units of summer independent reading toward major requirements.

 

Creative Writing Track

A student majoring in English on the Creative Writing Track must satisfactorily complete at least 11 units. Students on the Creative Writing track may use a single course to fulfill more than one requirement in the major in categories 2 and 3. Students must take at least two literature courses at the 300 level. Courses taken outside of the English Department may count as electives towards the major with the approval of the English Department Curriculum Committee. 

  1. Gateway courses (2 units, both required):
    1. EN100 Introduction to Literature: or EN221 Introduction to Poetry
    2. EN250 Introduction to Literary Theory
  2. Foundations and Transformations courses (2 units, 1 unit of each required; 1 must be taken at the 300 level; may be taken outside the English Department):
    1. American Ethnic Minority Literature (including but not limited to EN251, EN252, EN277, EN295, EN296, EN297, EN298, EN385, EN387).
    2. Anglophone and Other National Literatures: Caribbean Literature, Postcolonial Literature, African Literature (e.g. EN270, EN272, EN373, EN375), literature courses in Classics, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, Spanish (in translation or in the original language—list is not comprehensive; excludes Canadian, Irish, Welsh, and Scottish literatures)
  3. Historical Period courses (3 units, 2 out of 3 must be taken at the 300 level):
    1. Medieval/Renaissance (EN202, EN220, EN225, EN310, EN311, EN312, EN313, EN320, EN321, EN326, EN328, EN329). 
    2. 18th and 19th Centuries (EN290, EN350, EN352, EN360, EN362, EN365, EN370, EN371, EN372, EN391, EN394)
    3. 20th and 21st Centuries (EN230, EN240, EN251, EN252, EN254, EN259, EN270, EN275, EN277, EN295, EN296, EN297, EN298, EN330, EN372, EN373, EN382, EN383, EN385, EN386, EN395, EN397, EN398). 
  4. Creative Writing Sequence (6 units, all required)
    1. EN282 Beginning Poetry or EN283 Beginning Fiction or EN285 Beginning Creative Nonfiction (1 unit)
    2. EN308 Advanced Poetry Workshop, or EN309 Advanced Fiction Workshop, or EN307 Advanced Creative NonFiction (1 unit)
    3. Senior CW Sequence: EN481 Senior Seminar: Creative Writing Workshop (2 units) and EN499 Senior Project (1 unit required; students may take up to 2 units of EN499)
    4. Elective: One creative writing elective or an elective in another art discipline (e.g., studio art, screenwriting, photography, theater, dance, filmmaking; the course must involve the practice – not strictly the analysis – of another medium) (1 unit)

Students may use no more than two units of summer independent reading toward major requirements.

 

Minor Requirements

 

English Literature Minor

Requirements (5 units)

  • Two units required:
    • EN221 Introduction to Poetry or EN100 Introduction to Literature:
    • EN250 Introduction to Literary Theory
  • Two units required: One from each category below; one may be at the 200-level.
    • Literature before 1700: Medieval, Renaissance, Shakespeare
    • Literature 1700-1900: 18th Century, Romanticism, 19th Century
  • One elective: Any English course (including creative writing) at any level.

 

Creative Writing Minor

Overview

The English minor in Creative Writing offers Non-English Majors multiple opportunities to hone writing and reading skills and to put into practice methods and techniques for building compelling stories, poems, essays, text-image or hybrid works, and voices. Through workshops, craft-focused classes, imaginative writing and engagement, and as readers of one another’s work, students will be able to work on their own creativity and writing alongside and in support of their major. The minor also opens up our writing community, which continues to grow through our Visiting Writers Series, writing contests, calls for publication, the Literary Publishing Adjunct, our department's literary journal Hairstreak Butterfly Review, and our continued dedication to supporting the literary arts in our community and beyond through the English Department’s array of courses and tracks.

Requirements (5 units)

  • One unit required:
    • EN221 Introduction to Poetry or EN100 Introduction to Literature:
    • EN250 Introduction to Literary Theory
  • One Beginning Creative Writing unit required:
    • EN281 Introduction to Creative Writing or
    • EN282 Beginning Poetry Writing or
    • EN283 Beginning Fiction Writing or
    • EN285 Beginning Creative Nonfiction Writing
  • One Advanced Creative Writing unit required:
    • EN307 Advanced Creative NonFiction Workshop or 
    • EN308 Advanced Poetry Workshop or
    • EN309 Advanced Fiction Workshop
  • Two Electives (Literature courses must be EN courses or cross-listed as such):
    • One literature course.
    • One literature or creative writing course (any level or subject).

 

Courses

English

An introduction to literary analysis, close reading, and form across an array of historical periods, genres, and traditions. Meets the Critical Learning: AIM requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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This high-energy workshop allows creative writers to try their hands at a range of styles. From prose to spoken word to plays, we will explore across genres, building a tool box of literary adventure. (Summer only 2024-25).

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History of the English Language provides an overview of the origins, development, and global reach of the English language. Class discussions will focus on the social and political events that have influenced linguistic changes in English. Students will consider the impact of invasion, conquest, and colonization on the development of the English language. Students will also explore how changes in the English language’s sound systems, grammar, and vocabulary (from Old English to Middle English to Early Modern English to contemporary English) reflect changing cultural power dynamics. Literary examples will provide context for these explorations. Meets the Critical Learning: AIM requirement. Meets the Critical Learning: HP requirement. Meets the Equity and Power: EPG requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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The study of a single theme or subject as it emerges in selected periods of literature, chiefly English and American, from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Attention will be directed toward the Classical and Medieval origins of texts and traditions. The historical periods and the subjects will vary from section to section and from year to year. The focus will be upon such themes and subjects as nature, cities, love, oppression, satire, the epic, narrative, and critical tradition and revolt. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Examines a single literary genre or mode such as pastoral, epistle, romance, tragedy, or satire within and across a range of historical periods and cultural and national contexts. May include related theoretical and critical readings. (Not offered 2024-25).

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An introduction to reading (or interpreting) narrative fiction. (Offered in some years as Writing Intensive.) (Not offered 2024-25).

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Examines creativity from both a theoretical and a practical standpoint. The course is divided into three sections. The first explores theoretical material on creativity as an individual process and practical exercises on generating creative material. The second examines creativity as a product of social groups, especially as this relates to the issue of 'craft'. The third focuses on creativity as it is tied to particular times and places and practical issues of making creative products public. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Provides an introductory vocabulary and structure regarding the history of books, bibliography, textual materiality, and printing. Topics explored will include the rise of writing, the scroll, manuscript codices, the growth of literate culture, the invention of movable type and the impact of printing on scholarship, science, and religion, the distribution and marketing of books, the rise of a reading public, the shift from hand- to machine-powered printing, and the move from printed to electronic formats. Meets the Critical Learning: HP requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Introduction to close reading of poetry through a wide range of poems. Students will learn the terminology and techniques used to analyze poetry and employ these in readings of poems, and will become familiar with a variety of poetic forms and traditions. Meets the Critical Learning: AIM requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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The Bible considered as one of the great literary works of the Western world and, in the King James translation, a masterpiece of English prose. Emphasis on its narrative structure, its characterization, and the beauty and power of its language, with some attention to its influence on later works of literature. (Not offered 2024-25).

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An introduction to Shakespeare’s dramatic works through four to seven representative plays Meets the Critical Learning: AIM requirement. Meets the Equity and Power: EPG requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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An introduction to environmental literature, through genres such as nature writing, memoir, climate fiction (cli-fi), and topics such as wilderness, apocalypticism, climate change, and environmental justice. (Not offered 2024-25).

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The early modern era introduced and heightened critical debates on identity, medicine, and the human body that resonate in contemporary society. This course will focus on the discussions around the notion of disability and its representation, purpose, and function in literature and film by looking specifically at the theoretical writings of prominent scholars of the new Critical Disability Studies paradigm. Taking these approaches, the course will then apply such critical frames to texts and films produced over the last 3 centuries. (Not offered 2024-25).

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An introduction to literary theory and criticism. Students will study selected poetry, plays and fiction through leading methods such as New Criticism, Structuralism, Deconstruction, and New Historicism, with attention to such topics as Psychoanalytic, Marxist, Feminist, and Post-Colonial approaches. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own critical approaches. Meets the Critical Learning: AIM requirement.

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Provides a broad overview of literature by Native American writers through a range of genres, modes, and media. Builds an indigenous-centered understanding of the literary terrain and evaluates former and current expectations set upon texts by Native American writers by studying the social, cultural, historical, and literary contexts of which each generation of writers/artists have engaged in subtle, sweeping, restorative, and/or even problematic ways. Identifies and studies key concepts, terms, and methods by tracing chronologically themes such as settler colonialism and genocidal trauma; tribal sovereignty and current social issues; and, stereotypes, tropes and modern Native American identity and conflicts of authenticity, as well as survival models of resistance and recovery for Indigenous peoples in literature. 1 unit. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Examines literature by Native American writers through cultural, social, historical, generic, and/or aesthetic lenses. Students will focus on a curated selection of texts by Native American writers in order to identify and study key concepts, terms, methods, and techniques through a concentrated scope. Topics may include, for example, works by Native American writers and artists within specific literary genres or alongside another medium (art, film, etc.). 1 unit. (Not offered 2024-25).

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The literature of the Native Americans, the Spanish, and the Anglos. Readings in transcribed poetry and song, diaries, folk literature, and modern authors such as D. H. Lawrence, Willa Cather, Edward Abbey, Rudolfo Anaya, and Leslie Silko. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Examines literature dealing with the American West, its reflection of imperialism and settler colonialism, the idea of the frontier, the influence of the land and landscape, and the history around which the literature revolves. Meets the Critical Learning: AIM requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Introduces features of what might be called a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer literary and theoretical tradition. Uses classical, Renaissance, modern postmodern, and contemporary literature, criticism, and film to examine the complicated status and experience of non-majority sexualities. Considers writers, theorists and activists who have explored the relationships among sexuality, knowledge, and literature, including Plato, Michel Foucault, Oscar Wilde, Shakespeare, Nella Larsen, James Baldwin and Alison Bechdel. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Introduces students to the history, theory, and study of postcolonial literature. We will read literary and theoretical texts from and about the Caribbean, Ireland, Britain, Africa, and India in order to see how postcolonial writers appropriate and retool the English language and its literary forms. We will examine how this writing expresses the dynamics of decolonization and the complexities of postcolonial societies, while also allowing us to consider whether the world we live today is truly postcolonial. Meets the Equity and Power: EPG requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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What does it mean to be a black or mixed-race European woman today? This class explores the way some of the preeminent writers in Europe negotiated black European identities and issues of citizenship in France, the United Kingdom, Germany, and other European countries. Topics include: different approaches to artistically theorizing and expressing the emotional, social, and political effects of transnational migrations; cultural hybridity; struggles for citizenship rights; and the intersectional perplexities of gender. Writers and artists explored in this course include: Maud Sulter, Jamika Ajalon, Gisèle Pineau, May Opitz, the Algerian, and Nina Bouraoui. Students will have the option to read French texts in the original language and to focus on issues of translation. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Explores the history and craft of graphic narrative from the eighteenth century to the contemporary moment. Students will consider how the medium of comics negotiates both visuality and textuality by tracing the role of typography and iconography in the development of graphic narrative from its designation as pop cultural ephemera to high literary and artistic form. Considers writers and theorists such as Roland Barthes, Scott McCloud, W.J.T. Mitchell, Marshall McLuhan, Lynd Ward, Will Eisner, Art Spiegelman, Marjane Satrapi, Daniel Clowes, Chris Ware, Alan Moore, and Alison Bechdel. Meets the Critical Learning: AIM requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Traces the historical and aesthetic development of comics as a cultural form as deployed by Jewish writers and artists. Looks at the early days of the comics industry, Jewish oppression and racialization, the creation of the superhero, and the Jewish immigrant experience to examine how Jewish artists have utilized the narrative possibilities of comics as a hybrid medium with particular focus on the Holocaust, global diaspora, and Jewish-American identity. Meets the Equity and Power: EPUS requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Studies in a wide array of cultural, social, historical, generic, and aesthetic topics in British and American literature. Designed for first-year students, sophomores, non-majors, as well as majors.

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An introduction to creative writing through various forms and genres including poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Practice in writing poetry. Meets the Critical Learning: CP requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Practice in writing prose fiction. Meets the Critical Learning: CP requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Practice writing nonfiction prose with literary, artistic intention. Typical uses include personal essays, biographical profiles, and prose essays dealing with issues in history, science, nature, travel, and culture which employ the narrative tools commonly used by writers of fiction. May be taken instead of EN 280 Literary Journalism, for credit for the thematic minor in Journalism. Meets the Critical Learning: CP requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Practice in writing specific genres, both fiction and non-fiction. Topics may include travel writing, autobiography, nature writing, science fiction, detective fiction, and others.

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Identifies techniques utilized by writers of performance, ranging from slam poets to monologists to playwrights. Script and poem excerpts as well as video and audio samples will serve as the basis for in-class conversations around craft. Students will embark on a series of short solo and group writing exercises, trying their hand at a myriad of performance writing forms. Selected student work of merit will be presented in a final public staged reading. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Origins in the New Republic (Charlotte Temple, Wieland, the Last of the Mohicans, Hope Leslie), 19th-century young adulthood (The Blithedale Romance, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The American). Historical conditions that nurtured or stymied the development of the novel. Practice in close textual reading. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Examines focused topics regarding literary works by Asian American writers through cultural, social, historical, generic, and/or aesthetic lenses. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Explores major themes and texts in a variety of American ethnic writings including but not limited to African American, Asian American, Native American, and Latinx literatures. Provides an overview of the foundations and the possible futures of literary approaches to race and ethnicity in the United States. Introduces the role literature plays in creating and maintaining a racial and ethnic identities. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Explores major themes and texts in Asian American Literature and provides an overview of the foundations and the possible futures of the field. Introduces the role literature plays in creating and maintaining a pan-Asian political label. Presents the Vietnam War as a watershed moment to discuss the many shifts within the field, such as the emergence of Southeast Asian American writers and the rise of Gender Studies. Meets the Equity and Power: EPUS requirement.

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This course offers an introduction to Chicanx/Latinx literature in the United States. Examines the relationship between place and identity for Chicanx/Latinx peoples of the Southwest, West, and Midwest and considers how written texts reflect social, political, and historical contexts by addressing issues of colonialism, race, class, gender, and sexuality. (Not offered 2024-25).

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As contemporary writers work towards inventing characters that better represent our diverse world in their fiction, they often must wrestle with constructing identity through and against stereotypes, privilege, overt and indirect racism, objectification, and bias. Even the most valiant attempts for racial, gendered, LGBTQ*, and able-bodied inclusion in fiction come with concerns and unintended pitfalls, particularly when writers represent bodies that are radically different than their own. Students will read multiple texts, participate in discussions and research, and write responses, essays, and creative experiments in order to begin a discussion on body and identity representation in contemporary fiction. This literature course focuses on craft writing with a heavy writing component; however, there is no creative writing prerequisite. With an emphasis upon close reading, we will begin with a study of character construction and review trends of body representation in literature starting with the early novel before delving into current and ongoing articles and arguments. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Extended format adjunct (.25 unit per semester or .5 unit per full year). Studies in a wide array of creative writing practice, publishing, or cultural, social, historical, generic, and aesthetic topics in British and American literature. Designed for declared English majors (any track). (Not offered 2024-25).

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In-depth examination of a single literary genre or mode (such as pastoral, epistle, romance, horror, tragedy, or satire) within and across a range of historical periods and cultural and national contexts. Includes theoretical and critical readings. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Key issues in literary interpretation. Cultural criticism, Marxism, structuralism and deconstruction, feminist theory, ethnic criticism, psychoanalysis, hermeneutics, rhetorical criticism, etc. (Not offered 2024-25).

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This course is a continuation of Beginning Creative Nonfiction Writing and is intended for students who are experienced in reading, writing, and experimenting across the genre, as well as in sharing and discussing their work and encouraging and supporting the work of their classmates. Students will work in both short and longer forms, while developing and cultivating specific projects, and methods of both creative research and revision. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Writing workshop for experienced writers, with focus on issues of craft in poetry. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Writing workshop for experienced writers, with focus on issues of craft in fiction. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Selected English and/or Continental literature of the period 400-1500, organized around a specific topic or theme. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Introduction to Middle English and close reading of selections from The Canterbury Tales (Not offered 2024-25).

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Introduction to Middle English and close reading of selections from Chaucer's minor poems, including The Book of the Duchess, Troilus and Criseyde, The Legend of Good Women, and Parlement of Fowles. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Intensive study (in translation) of Dante and his intertexts as context for readings and/or further coursework in later English literature (Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Shelley, Joyce, T. S. Eliot, etc.). (Not offered 2024-25).

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Selected literature of the period 1500-1660, organized around a specific topic or theme. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Selected poetry of the period 1500-1660 focusing on a single poet (such as Donne or Spenser), a group of poets (such as Donne and the Metaphysicals or Ben Jonson and the Tribe of Ben), or a particular genre of poetry (such as narrative verse, the lyric, pastoral poetry, the sonnet sequence, or satire.) (Not offered 2024-25).

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Detailed study of one of the following groups: 1) histories, 2) comedies and romances, 3) major tragedies, 4) a number of the works grouped according to a thematic principle. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Tragedies, comedies, and tragi-comedies by Shakespeare's contemporaries. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Major poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with particular emphasis on Paradise Lost. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Key issues in ecocriticism and/or the environmental humanities through the sustained study of a particular genre or mode, or in a particular historical period. Includes theoretical and critical readings. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Selected British (and occasionally some American) literature of the period 1660-1830, organized around a specific topic or theme. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Examines the origins of the British novel as literary and cultural form from the late 17th century through the early 19th century. Emphasis on one or several of the following critical issues: the epistolarity, satire, spiritual narrative, representations of disability, race, class, and gender, imperialism and colonialism, and narrative theory. Authors may include Haywood, Behn, Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, Burney, Smollett, Sterne, Mackenzie, Smith, Edgeworth, and Austen. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Selected literature of the period 1780-1830, organized around a specific Romantic-era topic or theme. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Examines the novel from 1780 to 1830. Authors may include Godwin, Smith, Radcliffe, Lewis, Wollstonecraft, Edgeworth, Austen, Shelley, Hogg, and Scott. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Principal works of selected Romantic-era poets, such as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Smith, Barbauld, Burns, Robinson, Byron, Keats, the Shelleys, Hemans, and Clare, with attention to formal, critical, and historical issues. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Selected fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose which looks at a problem or theme in 19th-century British and/or American literature such as narratives of identity, archetypes of city and nature, the politics of genre, comparisons of British and American culture, and the nature of literary periods themselves. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Selected works by poets writing after 1830, such as Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, the Rossettis, Hopkins, with attention to formal and historical issues. (Not offered 2024-25).

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The novel in Britain 1815-1914, with emphasis on such authors as Thackeray, the Brontes, Dickens, George Eliot, Trollope, Hardy, and Conrad. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Advanced topics course exploring the theoretical and literary issues, questions, and themes raised in the rich literature, culture and theory that emerge as a response to and in contestation of the experiences of the colonial and postcolonial worlds. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Built on the histories of colonialism, slavery, and indentureship, the Caribbean region has been at the heart of global movements of people and commodities for centuries. This course introduces students to the history of the region through close engagement with literary and cultural productions. It focuses on authors from African, Indian, and Chinese heritages that call these islands home. Discussions are organized around themes of empire, labor migration, racial intimacies, and modes of narrativizing collective histories developed by Caribbean authors. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Study of Irish writing through a range of writers such as Swift, Edgeworth, Joyce, Yeats, O'Brien and Heaney. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Studies in a wide array of topics in American and British literature and media. (Not offered 2024-25).

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In-depth study of one major author, either contemporary or from an earlier period. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Selected fiction exploring some aspect of the century's literary and cultural concerns or some particular literary movement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Selected poetry exploring some aspect of the century's literary and cultural concerns or some particular poetic movement. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Readings in black American writers such as. W. E. B. Dubois, Ralph Ellison, Nella Larsen, and Rita Dove. Organized around aesthetic and cultural issues such as feminism, the 'anxiety of influence,' pressures of the marketplace, identity politics, and post-modern theory. (Not offered 2024-25).

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A concentrated study of Joyce's masterpiece, using extensive historical, biographical, critical, and theoretical materials. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Three centuries of texts by African-American women who have conspired with, rebelled against, and created literary traditions, such as Zora Neale Hurston, Pauline Hopkins, Rita Dove, Andrea Lee, and Nella Larsen. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Major and minor works of the colonial period and the early republic by such writers as Edwards, Franklin, Rowlandson, Charles Brockden Brown, Cooper, and Irving. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Examines major American authors of the 19th century. Authors may include Sedgwick, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, Emerson, Dickinson, Thoreau and Whitman. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Major works of such authors as Dickinson, Mark Twain, Henry James, Crane, Robinson, Dreiser, Wharton and Henry Adams. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Explores advanced theoretical and literary issues, questions, and themes raised in the literature, culture and theory of various American ethnic writings including but not limited to African American, Asian American, Native American, and Latinx literatures. Provides in depth examination of the foundations and the possible futures of literary approaches to race and ethnicity in the United States by highlighting the role literature plays in creating and maintaining racial and ethnic identities. (Not offered 2024-25).

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The rise of Modernist literature in the U.S. in relation to its discontents. Writers may include Eliot, Pound, W.C. Williams, Cather, Toomer, Stein, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hurston, and O’Neill. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Major works of such authors as O'Connor, Pynchon, Delillo, Carver, Morrison, Wallace and others. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Methodological preparation for advanced work in the literature track. Focus on secondary critical texts in the study of a literary topic or period. Required of junior English literature track majors. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Methodological preparation for advanced work in the literature track. Focus on secondary critical texts in the study of a literary topic or period. Required of junior English literature track majors. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Methodological preparation for advanced work in the literature track. Focus on secondary critical texts in the study of a literary topic or period. Required of junior English literature track majors. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Advanced study of a topic of literary significance. Required of all senior Literature Track English majors and of all senior Film Track English majors. Students taking this course for 1 unit must complete EN499 as well. Students taking this course for 2 units complete their senior theses within the course. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Two-block advanced study of creative writing culminating in a creative capstone project such as a collection of short stories, a novella or novel, a collection of poems, a long essay or a collection of essays, or hybrid writing project. Required of all senior Creative Writing Track English majors. (Not offered 2024-25).

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Advanced study of a topic chosen by the student and approved by the department, with student research and writing directed by individual faculty member(s). Students may take a maximum of two independent Senior Project blocks (though only one is required).

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