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    Course List

    Courses offered for 2019-2020 Academic Year
    CO100: Introduction to Comparative Literature

    What is literature? What are genres? How should they be read, interpreted and evaluated? What social and personal functions does writing have? How is writing related to oral tradition? How do writers compare themselves to others (admiration and imitation, rejection, transformation)? Study of literary of texts from ancient to modern and from a variety of languages and cultures. Emphasis on close reading of literary texts as well as critical research, analysis, and writing. 

    2 units — Hughes, Scheiner


    CO200: Topics in Comparative Literature

    Intermediate level consideration of various topics in comparative literature. Topics might include a single genre, a period or a theme. Texts usually in English but with reference to non-English materials within the competence of students. (May be offered as a January half-block.)

    1 unit — Department

    Block 1: The Avant-Garde 

    The history, theory, and evolution of the avant-garde in the 20th Century (and its death in the 21st Century), utilizing a variety of artforms: theatre, dance, film, poetry, and video. Early manifestoes of Futurism, Dada, Surrealism, and Theatre of Cruelty (among others) will be evoked, and a theoretical framework will be provided by Peter Bürger’s landmark work Theory of the Avant-Garde. The class is fierce, the material is daunting, the artistic imperative is the issue. (Also listed as TH200 and TH223)

    1 unit — Lindblade


    Block 1 FYE: Marginalized Identities: Gender and Justice

    This course seeks to understand how Greek myth imposed the ideological framework that governed the idea and the reality of justice between the genders, and how these forms are appealed to by later writers, including the Romans and contemporary American writers and filmmakers of color who wrestle with questions of gender and justice. The study of gender in Greek myth in its historical context and its evolution into contemporary culture takes as its starting point the imagined origins of the Greek gods as found in Hesiod’s foundational epic, Theogony. The relationships between men and women in the plays, and in the city, as well as questions of Athenian concepts of justice can be better understood by reflecting on the importance of the gendered power structure of the gods in epic and drama. Thus we will read dramas of Aeschylus, Aristophanes, and Euripides paying specific attention to the issue of gender relations and the creation of civic ideology.  Hundreds of years later, and writing from the margins in Rome, the playwright Terence, an African, brought to the city as a slave, used Athens as the setting for his domestic comedies that interrogated the ongoing battles of the sexes. The enduring aspect of these questions, as well as of the myths and plays themselves becomes apparent when we discover their powerful reappearance in American art and culture from Spike Lee to Luis Alfaro and Cherrie Moraga. Also offered as a 2 block FYE with Scheiner. 

    1 unit -- Hughes 


    Block 2 FYE: Marginalized Identities: Constructing and Deconstructing Identities

    An examination of prose fiction as a venue for explorations of identity, particularly of how identities are constructed as well as how literary texts can work to deconstruct stereotypical notions of identity and (re)present marginalized identities. Specific facets of identity considered include those of gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality in The Arabian NightsLe roman de Silence, Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, Ngüguï wa Thiong’o’s “Minutes of Glory,” Tahar Ben Jelloun’s The Sand Child, and Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of SuburbiaReflection on broader questions of identity construction in terms of self and other and self in the world in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Double, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis, Calvino’s The Non-Existent Knight, and several short stories of Jorge Luis Borges. Emphasis on close reading of literary texts as well as on critical analysis and writing. Also offered as a 2 block FYE with Hughes. 

    1 unit -- Scheiner


    Block 2: Landscape, Monuments and Myths (in Greece)

    The landscape of ancient Greece gave rise to the myths that endure into the twenty-first century. The vineyards of Dionysos, the olive tree of Athena, and the sailboat of Poseidon captured the imagination and sustained the economy in antiquity as now. The myths also inspired the many monuments that remain and remind us of the culture that inhabited these same spaces thousands of years ago. In this course, on site in Greece, the home of some of the most fabled ancient myths and monuments in world history, students will explore the intersections of landscape, monumental structures, and myths. The Parthenon of Athena and the Theater of Dionysos on the Athenian acropolis, the vineyards of the Peloponesos, the sacred oracle of Delphi, Homer’s wine-dark Aegean Sea, the storied temple of Poseidon at Sounion, and more will begin to yield up some of their secrets as we read the ancient texts in their presence. Taught in Greece. Program Fee. 

    1 unit -- Hughes


    Block 2: Mafia Movies

    The mafia in Italy is referred to as a “piovra” or “octopus” as the phenomenon has pervaded almost every factor of Italian cultural life. Tony Soprano, Don Vito and Michael Corleone, Lucky Luciano, Robert De Niro, Salvatore Giulano, Martin Scorsese, Placido Rizzotto, Peppino Impastato, and Leonardo Sciascia are some of the historical and fictional figures that contribute to the myth of the Italian and Italian-American mafia. In this course we will identify these protagonists of movie folklore and critically assess their relationship to history, politics and social relations. We will use Italy as a backdrop for our discussions, including potential site visits to towns and former sets as a way of examining the topic further.  (taught in English) Also listed as IT320 and FS205. Taught in Italy--Program fee applies.  

    1 unit -- O'Riley


    Block 3: Myth & Meaning (in Greece)

    Religion and myth of ancient Greece and Rome in relation to that of the ancient Mediterranean (Akkadian, Hittite, Sumerian, Egyptian). Female presence in art, literature and religion compared to treatment of women in their respective cultures. Theoretical approaches to the understanding of myth (Comparative, Jungian, Structuralist) in relation to myths as they are encoded in their specific cultures. Students may trace a myth through Medieval, Renaissance and modern transformations in art, music, poetry and film, or study myth in other cultures (e.g. Norse and Celtic). Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. Also listed as Classics 220 and Feminist and Gender Studies 220 . Taught in Greece. Program Fee.                                                    

    1 unit -- Thakur


    Block 3: The Bible As Literature

    The Bible considered as one of the great literary works of the Western world and, in the King James translation, a masterpiece of English prose. Emphasis on its narrative , structure, its characterization, and the beauty and power of its language, with some attention to its influence on later works of literature. Also listed as EN223.                        

    1 unit -- Hughes


    Block 3: Contemporary Psychoanalysis in Chicago

    An introductory study of Freud and Kohut and the transformation of their theories in contemporary psychoanalysis. Students will read the works of and meet with distinguished psychoanalysts who will present new approaches to understanding psychoanalytic theory and therapeutic action. We will also explore how psychoanalysis can be used in the interpretation of culture, especially art and theater. Taught in part in Chicago at the Chicago Institute for Psychoanalysis. The first week is spent at CC learning Freud and Kohut; the next 2 ½ weeks are spent at the Chicago Psychoanalytic Institute. 1 unit. Program Fee.

    1 unit -- Riker, Dobson


    Block 5: Cultivating Creativity: Unplugging to Explore the Act of Creative Living

    What does it mean to live creatively? Not necessarily to make one's vocation that of an artist, but rather to tap one's own inherent creativity in such a way that both directs and enlivens one's personal and professional pursuits. What can psychoanalysis and literature reveal about the art of creative living and the ways in which one's creative potential may be accessed, as well as foreclosed, denied, or derailed? How might a keener attunement to our own creative impulses and desires help us unpack the narratives by which we presently live our lives, and offer new perspectives on these stories? In this course, we will explore the origins of creativity and the ways in which we may better access it in our own lives. We will also examine the relationships that we may have with technology that can undermine reflective, meaning-making capacities that enable creative living.

    1 unit -- Maksimowicz


    Block 5: Discovering the Unconscious

    Major psychoanalytic perspectives of the late 19th and 20th centuries on the concept of the unconscious in theory, case studies, and fiction. Emphasis on unconscious processes as they relate to the formation of identity. Readings from such authors as Freud, Jung, Klein, Winnicott, Kohut, and Yalom. Also listed as Philosophy 262 and Psychology 120.     

    1 unit -- Dobson


    Block 5: Italian and German Culture Through Film

    From World War II to Today. Since 1945, the end of World War II, European society has experienced deep socio-political changes that have affected people’s lives and culture. This class examines the way film directors have represented these changes, focusing on Germany and Italy, two countries that were allies during the war and that faced problematic reconstructions after the Nazi and the Fascist regimes. Starting with an Italian representation of Germany, this course walks you through mirror-image representations of German and Italian major political and cultural events, including post-war reconstruction, immigration, and romance. With the help of the lenses of cultural history and film studies, you will gain a good understanding of the socio-political milieux of these two European countries in the aftermath of World War II and in the present day. We will discuss each film in light of its aesthetic relevance, as well as its historical and cultural significance. The parallel study of Germany and Italy is particularly fruitful and it shows how the path two countries diverged noticeably after the Second World Conflict. Screenings will be preceded by readings and a brief lecture that will profile the historical background and illustrate some of the most important debates for each event. Among other questions, we will ask: How can film open a window on a country’s cultural, social, and political history? Which challenges did the first directors grappling with issues of cultural and political reconstruction face? How was the transition from dictatorship to democracy represented shortly after the war? How did German and Italian cinematic productions look at each other? No prior knowledge of German or Italian is required. You will keep a journal with your screening notes, and you will post on Canvas post-screening reflections for each film. (Also listed as IT320, GR220, GR320, FM200)

    1 unit --Minervini, Steckenbiller


    Block 5: Literature and Film

    Analysis of several novels and screenplays of different periods in comparison with their film versions in order to examine various modes of interpretation of the two media. Conducted in English. Students wishing to obtain credit for the French major, or the minor, must consult the instructor at the beginning of the course. For majors, novels must be read and papers must be written in French. No prerequisite. 1 unit. (Also listed as FR310, FM200)

    1unit -- O'Riley


    Block 5: Marginalized Identities: Gender and Justice

    This course seeks to understand how Greek myth imposed the ideological framework that governed the idea and the reality of justice between the genders, and how these forms are appealed to by later writers, including the Romans and contemporary American writers and filmmakers of color who wrestle with questions of gender and justice. The study of gender in Greek myth in its historical context and its evolution into contemporary culture takes as its starting point the imagined origins of the Greek gods as found in Hesiod’s foundational epic, Theogony. The relationships between men and women in the plays, and in the city, as well as questions of Athenian concepts of justice can be better understood by reflecting on the importance of the gendered power structure of the gods in epic and drama. Thus we will read dramas of Aeschylus, Aristophanes, and Euripides paying specific attention to the issue of gender relations and the creation of civic ideology.  Hundreds of years later, and writing from the margins in Rome, the playwright Terence, an African, brought to the city as a slave, used Athens as the setting for his domestic comedies that interrogated the ongoing battles of the sexes. The enduring aspect of these questions, as well as of the myths and plays themselves becomes apparent when we discover their powerful reappearance in American art and culture from Spike Lee to Luis Alfaro and Cherrie Moraga. Also offered as a 2 block FYE with Scheiner. 

    1 unitHughes


    Block 6: Marginalized Identities: Constructing and Deconstructing Identities

    An examination of prose fiction as a venue for explorations of identity, particularly of how identities are constructed as well as how literary texts can work to deconstruct stereotypical notions of identity and (re)present marginalized identities. Specific facets of identity considered include those of gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality in The Arabian NightsLe roman de Silence, Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, Ngüguï wa Thiong’o’s “Minutes of Glory,” Tahar Ben Jelloun’s The Sand Child, and Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of SuburbiaReflection on broader questions of identity construction in terms of self and other and self in the world in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s The Double, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis, Calvino’s The Non-Existent Knight, and several short stories of Jorge Luis Borges. Emphasis on close reading of literary texts as well as on critical analysis and writing. Also offered as a 2 block FYE with Hughes. 

    1 unit -Scheiner


    Block 6: Chekhov and Joyce: Inventing the Modern Short Story

    There is virtually no critical dispute that the Russian master dramatist and short story writer, Anton Chekhov, was and is a key figure in the modernist movement in literature. That modernism is marked by a fierce objectivity, strict avoidance of doctrinaire or dogmatic convictions and beliefs, close attention toward people and things, no matter what their status or place in the world might be. Plot should never be imposed upon a story but rather arise from questions of character and close observation, and an absolute democratic attitude toward the simple, often ignored, objects and things in the world. Above all, stories must be as brief as possible, daring and original, written in a style both cryptic and highly suggestive, that which is omitted as rich and powerful (maybe more so) than what is included. No extravagant overblown or romanticized endings, but rather Chekhov believed in a world full of irresolvable mysteries which may be "represented" but never fully understood, for what they are and not what we wish them to be. James Joyce proclaimed, perhaps speciously, in an interview with critic Herbert Gorman that before writing his very "Chekhovian" collection of stories, DUBLINERS, he had chosen not to read Chekhov's because he feared the master's extraordinary influence. It was Joyce's purpose to write in a style of "scrupulous meanness". not actually unlike Chekhov's dedication to "scrupulous" objectivity in his writing. The Joycean artist sits, a deus absconditus, in a corner, silently "paring his fingernails" while his stories came to life, seemingly without any subjective agency. This is of course the very essence of the Chekhovian genius, the sense that these stories emerge from the world they belong to without the breathy presence of the artist looming over them demanding to be heard, to be recognized. Chekhov the realist genius sits like Joyce paring his fingernails, not preening his feathers. This indeed is one of the miracles of the objectivist strain of modernism practiced by Chekhov and Joyce (and later Ernest Hemingway in his early stories). It is the intention of this class to read these two great story writers both individually and in tandem with each other. Joyce may have (fecklessly) resisted Chekhov, but modern critics will have none of it, choosing to place these two geniuses in close proximity to each other, arguing both directly and indirectly for Chekhov's influence over Joyce, and for Joyce's influence over our readings of Chekhov. Few doubt Chekhov's reputation as the greatest of all short story writers, and few doubt as well the remarkable contribution James Joyce has made to the Chekhovian tradition. Close attention will also be paid to the worlds in which Chekhov and Joyce lived, the world of the czars and their repressions of freedom, and the presence of the English crown looming the impoverished captive nation of Ireland. Finally, these are short stories as great and powerful as any novel. Chekhov perhaps best captures his feeling for what a short story can accomplish, quoting Alphonse Daudet on why the short story is one of the triumphs of modern writing. Daudet writes: "Why are thy songs so short?" a bird once was asked. "Is it because thou art so short of breath?" The bird replied: "I have very many songs and I should like to sing them all." Also listed as RS200, EN200.

    1 unit -- Pavlenjo, Simon


    Block 6: Fascist Modernism

    In 1981, the German magazine Der Spiegel published a controversial cover image that suggested a link between the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche (the “thinker”) and the extreme bigotry and violence endorsed and perpetrated by Hitler (the “actor”). Since the decline of fascist movements such as National Socialism, there has occurred an ongoing scholarly discussion regarding the complicity of certain writers, and their literary and philosophical work, in the rise and success of these movements. This notion of “fascist modernism” is rooted in philosophies of irrationalism and what the intellectual historian Isaiah Berlin has called the “Counter-Enlightenment.” But are there cohesive categories of thought and/or art that are consonant with, even foundational for, the ideals, policies, and practices of fascism? If so, are these categories thematic, rhetorical, ideological, formal, historical, political, or something else? As a survey of modernism, this class will cover major works of literature from the late-nineteenth century to the end of World War II. As a way of interrogating the category of “fascist modernism,” our readings on art and politics will be organized around literature, film, and philosophy of both the political left and right. In order to gain a better historical understanding of German modernism, we will study texts from specific philosophical and aesthetic movements including nihilism, futurism, expressionism, aestheticism, the Frankfurt School, the conservative revolution, and the problematic category of “inner emigration” writing. By analyzing these texts in the context of National Socialist literature and literary policy, as well as reading habits and publication records from 1933-1945, our class will investigate the historical and aesthetic foundations and limits of “fascist modernism,” questioning both the critical and historical implications of this concept. Also listed as GR220/GR320/PH303

    1 unit -- Lisiecki


    Block 6: Gender and Sexuality in Japanese Literature Film and Manga

    This course explores how Japanese writers have dealt with the issues of gender and sexuality from the Heian Period through the modern era. Drawing on literary sources such as The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibi (11th c.), Five Women Who Loved Love by Ihara Saikaku (17th c.), and Kitchen by Yoshimoto Banana (20th c.), as well as films and manga, we will analyze how both male and female authors have portrayed gender and sexuality within an ever changing landscape. Also listed as JA252, PA250, and FG206                   

    1 unit -- Ericson


    Block 6: Medieval and Renaissance Theatre

    A study of theories about the ‘rebirth’ of theatre during the middle ages, tracing its development throughout Renaissance Europe, with special emphasis on Elizabethan England. Also listed as TH221 and EN280                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

    1 unit -- Lindblade, Evitt


    Block 6: Native Sons and Daughters: A Century of Chicago Literature

    Focus on literature of and about Chicago from the early 20th century to the present day. We will examine poetry, prose fiction, and drama from a diverse collection of Chicago authors over the course of a century. Background readings on cultural studies, critical race theory, the “great migration” of African Americans to Chicago, the Chicago Renaissance of African American poets, and the Mexican Migration to Chicago. We will learn about how writers of diverse ethnic and economic backgrounds, often in the face of intense oppression and through great struggle, helped to shape the cultural landscape of one of America’s greatest cities. Students will conduct research and write a paper drawing on the vast resources of the Newberry Library. Field trips to various parts of Chicago, including Pilsen, the American Writers Museum, Poetry Center of Chicago, and local theaters. (Also listed as EN280). Taught in Newberry Library, Chicago. Program Fees. 

    1 unit -- Davis


    Block 7: Topics in Francophone Culture Taught in English: Exploring Cajun and Creole Cultures in the US.
    (Extra $$$, Includes 6-day trip to New Orleans and Lafayette)

    This course, taught in English, explores the historical presence and significance of Cajun and Creole cultures in North America, in the US particularly. The course also studies the social and cultural significance of processes of Creolization of French, as well as French as a heritage language in the US. This investigation is carried through the reading and critical study of works by U.S. authors of Cajun and Creole origins. In this course, students view and explore filmic representations of histories and cultures of Creoles, and Cajuns in Louisiana. Filmic productions such as Ann Rice’s popular television series, Feast of All Saints, amongst others, will be studied. The course’s critical exploration of Cajun and Creole cultures culminates with a 6-day guided visit in the historical cities of New Orleans and Lafayette in Louisiana.  Also listed as FR317                                                

    1 unit -- Wade


    Block 8: Sci-Fi and the Posthuman

    Krzych


        Block 8: CO210 – Introduction to Literary Theory

    Introduction to the major twentieth-century theories of literature, including such approaches as formalism and structuralism, hermeneutics, reception theory, feminist theory, psychoanalytic approaches, post-structuralism and new historicism. Study of important theoretical texts as well as literary works from a variety of language traditions, exploring the ways in which theory informs possibilities of interpretation. Also listed as English 250.

    1 unit — Naji


    CO220: Topics in Comparative Literature: Literature and Other Disciplines

    Intermediate level consideration of various topics in comparative literature with particular emphasis on comparisons between literature and other disciplines. Topics might include a particular period or theme. Texts usually in English but with reference to non-English materials within the competence of students. (May be offered as a January half-block.)

    Block 4: Green Germany

    In recent years, Germany has attracted a lot of global attention for its green policies and aiming to switch to a 100% renewable economy. Angela Merkel’s decision to phase out nuclear energy in the wake of the Fukushima disaster in 2011 (originally an idea proposed by the red-green coalition in conjunction with the Clean Energy Act in the early 2000s) is today complemented by a renewed focus on coal amid growing concerns regarding recent IPCC reports and the US withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. Germany also has one of the highest solar power outputs and is leading in other cutting-edge research regarding renewable energy. Yet why has Germany embarked on such an ambitious path? What have been some of the struggles surrounding the Energiewende and what are the challenges that lie ahead? How does Germany compare to other countries and the United States? What can we learn from Germany? And how can we identify and tackle current threats to sustainability on a global scale? Through the lens of cultural studies, during this block we will try to answer these questions by analyzing cultural, historical, and political developments as they relate to environmental concerns. We will start with the motif of wandering and the mythical idea of the forest that can be traced back to the 18th century before we move on to the 19th and 20th century. We will, for instance, explore new trends concerning nature, conservation, and protection in the early 1900s such as the Lebensreform and other early environmental movements, green ideas during National Socialism, environmental concerns after WWII, the ecological and other social movements of the 1970s and 80s, the birth of the Green Party, and, finally, current goals and initiatives in Germany, such as the Energiewende. Throughout the course we will draw on a variety of material (newspaper articles, climate reports, scholarly articles etc.), which will help students reflect critically on global and local issues, promote awareness of their own role in their communities, and foster a culture of respect, social responsibility, and environmental ethics. We will supplement those readings with poetry, fairy tales, short stories, novels, and other cultural products to learn about the social and cultural impacts of environmental issues and practices. Also listed as GR220, GR320, EV261.

    1 unit -- Steckenbiller


    Block 6: Psyche, Symbol, Dream. C.G. Jung and Archetypal Psychology

    An introduction to the depth psychology of C.G. Jung, including his notions of the structure of the personal and collective unconscious, the function of archetypes and dreams in development and healing, and the transcendent function as it relates to the individuation process. Contemporary advances in Jungian work in such areas as ecopsychology, soul psychology and Jungian feminist thought will also be considered. (Also listed as HS218)

    1 unit --Dobson


    Block 7: The Art of Living: Greek Literature Ancient and Modern 

    A study of great literature in several genres, paying close attention to comparison of ancient and modern writers and cultures from the world’s longest continuous literary tradition. In these readings we learn that the art of living involves care of the body, mind, and spirit. This course is taught in Greece, which allows us to read texts in settings closely related to their original composition. Enjoy the continuity in the traditions of seasonal farm to fork dining, bathing in Homer's sea, athletic training in ancient Olympia, and feel the penetrating clarity of the Greek sun that has influenced thinkers and artists since antiquity. From this, we understand how modern Greece continues to illuminate our lives. In addition to Athens, site visits include Ancient Olympia, Delphi and the ancient oracle, and the Venetian seaside town of Nafplio. (Also listed as EN280) Taught in Greece. Program Fee. 

    1 unit -- Hughes, Mason


    Block 8: Psyche, Symbol, Dream. C.G. Jung and Archetypal Psychology

    An introduction to the depth psychology of C.G. Jung, including his notions of the structure of the personal and collective unconscious, the function of archetypes and dreams in development and healing, and the transcendent function as it relates to the individuation process. Contemporary advances in Jungian work in such areas as ecopsychology, soul psychology and Jungian feminist thought will also be considered. (Also listed as HS218)

    1 unit --Dobson


    CO300 – Practice in Comparison

    Deepening of comparative reading and critical writing begun in 100. Specific topics, themes or genres as well as texts to vary from year to year. Designed to promote the 'practice' and encouragement of more sophisticated textual work, greater perception of literary issues, and clarity of writing. Prerequisite: consent of instructor or Comparative Literature 100. Also listed as: Also listed as English 380.


    Block 3: The Novel as a Genre
    Examination of the novel as a genre in a comparative context. We will begin by looking at what elements constitute a novel and how the novel compares to other genres. To illustrate, we will study two “classic” British novels—Defoe’s Moll Flanders and Austen’s Emma—in conjunction with seminal theoretical statements on certain of these elements. We will then explore three more recent novels—Woolf’s To The Lighthouse, Nabokov’s Pale Fire, and Calvino’s If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler—to see how our reading of the text becomes more complicated by the novelist’s experimentation with language and form. (Also listed as EN380)

    1 unit -- Scheiner


    Block 4: CO310: Junior/ Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature                                        

    Preparation for the senior thesis; opportunity for students to discuss their work, the work of their colleagues, and theoretical texts of common interest in a workshop setting. Examination of what it means to engage in the study of Comparative Literature and, in particular, of current issues and debates within the discipline. Contextualizing of students' work within a larger, disciplinary framework. Prerequisite: Junior standing, reading knowledge of a language other than English, and a 300 level course in English, or other literature, or consent of instructor.                                                                                                                                                                                                            

    1 unit -- Scheiner


    CO351: Advanced Topics in Comparative Literature

    Topics to include periods, genres, themes, movements or other groupings of texts. (May be taught as a January half-block.) Also listed as Spanish 316; Religion 346; Italian 321; Feminist and Gender Studies 206; Philosophy 314. Prerequisite: 200 or 300-level lit course in CO, EN, or other literatures or consent of instructor. 


    The Qur'an

    Since the earliest records India and the West have encountered each other in traveler's logs, historical accounts and a range of literary genres. In the eyes of the other these cultural and geopolitical bodies have been imagined as the end of the earth, land of opportunity, spiritual destination and center of depravity. This class looks at a range of such constructions of the other in texts from India, Pakistan, England, the United States and Portugal to better understand their long interrelated histories. Selected readings may include Rudyard Kipling's Kim, Ruth Jhabvala's Heat and Dust, W. Somerset Maugham's The Razor's Edge, Gita Mehta's Karma Cola, and Mohsin Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist. Prerequisite: 200 or 300-level lit course in CO, EN, or other literatures or consent of instructor. 1 unit Also listed as RE346

    1 unit -- Wright


    CO352 – Topics in Comparative Literature: Literature and Other Disciplines

    Examination of post-communist political and economic changes in Eastern Europe, Central Europe, and Russia following the fall of communism through the lenses of political theory, economic theory, and literature. Exploration of how literature not only reflects and comments on political and economic developments but also enacts them.

    Prerequisite: 200 or 300-level literature course in Comparative Literature, English or other literature course; any 100 or 200 level Political Science course or Consent of Instructor. Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 200 and Film and Media Studies 200 and Spanish 316.


    CO391 – Advanced Literary Theory

    In-depth study of important 20th-century movements of thought about literature and art. Topics vary from year to year and may include Russian Formalism, semiotics, New Criticism, phenomenology and hermeneutics, reader response criticism, psychoanalytic theory, feminist theory, post-colonial theory, queer theory and gender theory., and another, 200-level literature course, or consent of instructor. Prerequisite: 210 (or English 250) or consent of instructor. Also listed as English 306

    Block 5: Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity

    Examines various theoretical and conceptual approaches to the study of race and ethnicity. Attention is given to the various ways race and ethnicity have been defined and understood including the ethnicity paradigm, class-based perspectives, and racial formation theory. Examines debates and controversies in the study of race and ethnicity as well as emergent themes and recent developments in the scholarship. Possible topics include a focus on the interrelations among race and other axes of difference such as gender, class, and sexuality, race and the structuring of space, the legal construction of race, race and media culture, and race and the prison-industrial complex. Prerequisite: Feminist & Gender Studies 110 or Race, Ethnicity, and Migration 185. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.)

    1 unit -- Davis, Naji


        Block 7: CO431 Senior Thesis

    Thesis subject chosen by student and approved by Comparative Literature Program Director. Choice of subject, research, outline and writing completed in this course. Prerequisite: Comparative Literature 310, required for Majors. 

    1 unit -- Scheiner