Skip to main content area Skip to sub-navigation
Skip to main content
Walsenburg northbound - Colorado high plains

2019

Conservation in the West Poll 

The 9th Annual Survey of Voters in the Rocky Mountain West

The Colorado College State of the Rockies project is pleased to make available the results of the January, 2019 Conservation in the West Survey, conducted by New Bridge Strategy and Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates. Polling in eight western states explores voters' bi-partisan opinions in each state and for the Rocky Mountain West. The survey polled registered voters in Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. Voters responded to questions concerning climate, energy, outdoor recreation, water, wildlife, the role of government, trade-offs with economies, and citizen priorities. 

Green Logo

January 31, 2019 Poll Presentation

Press Release

Poll Questions and Responses

INSTANT ACCESS:  9 years of Rockies poll data made visual

Summary Reports

State Infographics

Topic Reports

Climate Change

Energy

Latino Voters

Outdoor Recreation

Rejection of D.C.

Water

Wildlife


Climate Change:  A growing concern across the Rocky Mountain West

Colorado College State of the Rockies Project leaders rolled out the 2019 State of the Rockies Conservation in the West Poll on Jan. 31 in Denver at an outdoor recreation industry forum, presenting survey results that show rising public concern about water supplies and climate change. Listen to the live audio.   

State of the Rockies director Corina McKendry joined Gov. Jared Polis, conservationists and recreation industry officials at the forum and discussed the poll with journalists. Reporters from around the region phoned in to learn results of this poll that CC commissions each year.

It found that a majority of Colorado resicorina 2 poll 2019 OIA paneldents favor protecting the natural environment and wildlife. Fewer than 25 percent favor the increased production of fossil fuels using public lands that the Trump administration has prioritized. And the survey found that a majority want Congress to protect air, water quality and wildlife on public lands.

McKendry also served on an Outdoor Industry Association panel during a luncheon. A political scientist, McKendry conveyed the history and purpose of CC’s State of the Rockies Project and the poll. For more than a decade, CC students and faculty have looked into major environment issues playing out in the region.

Photo:  McKendry sits on luncheon panel with Outdoor Industry Association director Amy Roberts and Center for Western Priorities director Jennifer Rokala.

DavidSachsJordanVick 2019 OIAshowPublic opinion can play a role in shaping government policy. Poll results over the past decade show a consistent strong majority of western voters in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Montana, Idaho, Arizona and New Mexico consider themselves “conservationists.” This year, the poll found that 53 percent of Republicans and 87 percent of Democrats would support local fees or taxes to protect water, wildlife habitat and outdoor recreation opportunities.

McKendry told reporters that the poll findings reveal western values.  "That a leadership agenda out of step with those values is met with disapproval in the West is no surprise," McKendry said, “although the rejection of the current administration's priorities is particularly intense here."   Photo: Colorado College students Dave Sachs '20 and Jordan Vick '20 check out the Outdoor Industry Snow Show.  

Photos by Jennifer Coombes

Colorado College State of the Rockies project in the press                                                     

Listen to the krcc.org radio interview.  

-CHines

Media Coverage

Denver Post Yampa story

Letters to the editor, Feb. 20

Don’t make me plow twice

I grew up in Fargo, North Dakota, so I know my way around snow, shovels and tow straps. However, I am not a spring chicken, and I am really tired of being plowed in, not out, of my driveway. How much longer would it take street plows to not put 1 to 2 feet of snow at the end of every driveway?  REad more.

I left at 8 a.m. Friday to drop my husband off and returned at 8:20 to find 16 inches at the end of my drive in John Dodge. Struggling to remove it, I was helped by a Yellow Iron plow driver who cleared it out of kindness.