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Professor Sarah Hautzinger Has Two Recent Publications

Colorado College Professor of Anthropology Sarah Hautzinger has two new recent publications. The first is “Policing by and for Women in Brazil and Beyond,” published in the Sage Handbook of Global Policing in which she looks at Brazil’s delegacias da mulher (women’s police stations). Brazil represents a prominent global example of attempts to rebuild police response to deeply entrenched patterns of violence, as well as law enforcement’s relationships to women as citizens. Her chapter focuses on policing by and for women based on the notion that these are distinctive forms of intervention that provide opportunities for taking the global pulse of gender in relation to policing more generally. Brazil’s first all-female police station was created in 1985 in Sao Paulo, designed expressly for the purpose of registering, investigating, and prosecuting diverse forms of male violence against women.

Hautzinger’s other recent publication is a chapter titled “Military Families—The Long Journey Home,” co-authored with Jean Scandlyn and published in “Reflecting on America,” edited by Clare Boulanger. “Reflecting on America” draws on the expertise of 22 anthropological scholars, who examine what it means to be American. Hautzinger and Scandlyn’s chapter looks at what multiple deployments have asked of families at home, applying critical feminist perspectives alongside linguistic thought about code-switching to examine the challenges veterans and family members face when “codes” for daily life and survival radically and repeatedly change. Their contribution is drawn from a chapter in their 2014 co-authored book, “Beyond Post-Traumatic Stress: Homefront Struggles with the Wars on Terror.” The chapter’s title, “Codeswitching and Sticky Switches: Navigating Absence and Presence,” captures the essence of the argument: with the back and forth of deployments and homecomings, soldiers confront the limits of flexibility, getting “stuck” in the behavioral code from the theater of war.