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Emily Kohut ’16, Professor Levine Publish Music Curricula Study

Emily Kohut ’16, Professor Levine Publish Music Curricula Study

Colorado College Music Professor Victoria Levine and Emily Kohut ’16, who graduated from Colorado College as a double major in classics and English, have co-authored a chapter in the recently published “College Music Curricula for a New Century.”

Levine has taught ethnomusicology at CC since 1988, and Kohut, who focused on classical languages and literature, emphasizing Latin, served as Levine’s research assistant from 2014-16.

“College Music Curricula for a New Century,” edited by Robin D. Moore and published by Oxford University Press, considers what a more inclusive, dynamic, and socially engaged curriculum of musical study might look like in colleges and universities.

Levine and Kohut open their chapter, “Finding a Balance: Music at Liberal Arts Colleges,” by looking at how liberal arts music departments have evolved since the 1970s, when curricula emphasized interpretive performance of the Western canon, along with courses in music theory and history. They note that in less than 50 years, “the emphasis within liberal arts music departments shifted from Western music connoisseurship to professionalized training to coverage of multiple disciplines within the field of music.”

The authors cite the challenges facing liberal arts music departments and the need for faculty to transform the way music is taught and learned at small colleges in order to remain relevant, especially in the current cultural and economic climate. Their chapter explores how music faculty at 13 liberal arts colleges—Amherst, Bowdoin, Carleton, Colorado College, Davidson, Grinnell, Hampshire, Macalester, Pomona, Reed, Skidmore, Smith, and Williams— are facing these challenges by remapping their curricula and provides a snapshot of current trends in liberal arts music education.

“As a faculty member, it’s deeply rewarding to collaborate with research assistants like Emily, who bring great energy and enthusiasm to a project along with a genuine passion for learning. I’m delighted to share authorship of this article with her, and am thrilled by her success,” says Levine.

Kohut served as an intern for curricular development and programs with Harvard University’s Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C., during the summer of 2015. Following graduation last May, she worked for them again last summer, and then on a continuing basis during the academic year. She’ll be returning to Washington this summer to continue her work for them.