Colorado College News: Journalism http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-rss-news.html?cat=journalism, CC Journalism Instructor Alan Prendergast ’78 Honored Wed, 01 Apr 2015 00:00:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-journalism-instructor-alan-prendergast-78-honored http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-journalism-instructor-alan-prendergast-78-honored <p><b>Alan Prendergast &rsquo;78</b>, who teaches in Colorado College&rsquo;s journalism program, has been awarded the 2015 Eugene S. Pulliam National Journalism Writing Award by Ball State University. His article, <a href="http://features.westword.com/ludlow-massacre-anniversary/">&ldquo;Bloody Ludlow,&rdquo;</a> which commemorated the 100<sup>th</sup> anniversary of the worst labor conflict in American history, was the cover story in the April 14, 2014 issue of <i>Westword</i>, a Denver newspaper.<br /> <br /> Prendergast used archival research, interviews, and field observation to provide a detailed historical narrative explaining the origins of the 1914 Colorado coal strike, the escalation of violence against striking mine workers, and the destruction of the Ludlow tent colony and its aftermath. The judges cited the meticulous research involved, as well as vivid imagery and description, which provided a detailed, engaging account of a relatively unknown piece of American history.</p> <p>Prendergast has taught courses for the journalism minor at CC for more than a decade, with recent courses alternating between Magazine Writing and Literary Journalism (Block Seven 2015), in which students produce a magazine at the end of the block, and Reporting on Government (Block Six 2016). <br /> <br /> &ldquo;Alan is a splendid writer and has made a great contribution to the success of the journalism minor at CC,&rdquo; said Political Science Professor David Hendrickson, director of the journalism program.</p> <p>Prendergast began his journalism career as an office assistant at <i>The New Yorker</i>. In addition to a bachelor&rsquo;s degree in English from CC, he holds a master&rsquo;s degree in journalism from Ohio State University, where he studied as a Kiplinger Fellow. Prendergast will accept the award Wednesday, April 8 at Ball State University&rsquo;s Department of Journalism&rsquo;s annual awards luncheon.</p> Behind the Lens Fri, 18 Oct 2013 16:22:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/behind-the-lens http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/behind-the-lens ]]> <p>Renowned photojournalist <strong>David Burnett &rsquo;68</strong> has a simple piece of advice for photojournalists:&nbsp; &ldquo;Look away from where everyone else is looking &ndash; don&rsquo;t take the photo everyone else is.&rdquo;<br /><br />In a mesmerizing talk and slideshow for journalism students during Homecoming Weekend, Burnett showed how he had done exactly that, from freelancing in Vietnam during the war there, to covering the immediate aftermath of the military coup in Chile that overthrew its elected president, to documenting the 1984 Olympics, among many other assignments.<br /><br />In Vietnam, where he worked from 1970 to 1972, he benefited from the advice of Philip Jones Griffiths, the great Welsh photographer:&nbsp; &ldquo;Put 50 rolls in your rucksack, fly up to Da Nang and don&rsquo;t come back until you&rsquo;ve shot every roll.&rdquo;<br /><br />Today, even with digital equipment, this is good advice when you feel discouraged or unsure, Burnett said. &ldquo;Put your phone in your pocket and just go out and start shooting.&nbsp; Immerse yourself that way &ndash; understand what your story is all about.&rdquo;<br /><br />In Santiago, Chile, he was with the first wave of international journalists to document the brutal crackdown after the 1973 coup.&nbsp; In fact, his college-student appearance &ndash; wild, dark curly hair and beard, jeans and wire-rimmed glasses &ndash; may have led to his brief detention at gunpoint in a hallway of the national soccer stadium, where he and another foreign journalist listened to the screams of people being tortured and beaten.<br /><br />Still, he made what became an iconic photo of the times:&nbsp; a young man under arrest, staring grimly at the camera, surrounded by soldiers.&nbsp; The man became known as &ldquo;the man in the photo&rdquo; in Chile and elsewhere.&nbsp; &ldquo;The picture got huge play in Europe,&rdquo; Burnett said.&nbsp; &ldquo;It summed up the coup.&rdquo;<br /><br />The young man in the photo was released after seven weeks, rather than killed, and Burnett says he&rsquo;ll never know if the photo saved his life.<br /><br />In the 1984 Olympics, Burnett avoided the finish line and trained his camera on the women running the 3000-meter final, just in time to take a photo of the American runner Mary Decker, face contorted in pain, after a collision with South African Zola Budd.&nbsp; It became one of his most widely reproduced photos.<br /><br />&ldquo;That kind of thing forms you as a photographer, just being a witness,&rdquo; Burnett said.&nbsp; He urged students to understand the ways photography made a difference in the past, and yet take advantage of new forms and new methods. &nbsp;&ldquo;You have to figure out new ways to do things,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp; &ldquo;There are so many things to see.&rdquo;<br /><br />Burnett&rsquo;s journalism workshop is one of several planned for the academic year.&nbsp; Next:&nbsp; Filmmaker <strong>Mike Shum &rsquo;07</strong> will talk to journalism students in Block 3 about the documentary he&rsquo;s making of the life of the photojournalist Chris Hondros, who was killed covering the uprising in Misrata, Libya, in 2011.</p> Writing Center to be Renamed in Ruth Barton's Honor Tue, 04 Dec 2012 11:05:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/writing-center-to-be-renamed-in-ruth-barton-s-honor http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/writing-center-to-be-renamed-in-ruth-barton-s-honor <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">Colorado College&rsquo;s Writing Center will be renamed in honor of Professor Emerita of English Ruth Barton at noon, Friday, Dec. 7, in the Learning Commons at Tutt Library. Barton, a guiding force in the early years of the Writing Center, CC&rsquo;s journalism program, Cutler Publications, and a host of other writing-related endeavors at Colorado College, died Nov. 23. She was 78.<br /><br />A memorial service will be held in Shove Chapel at 2 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 8, with a reception afterward in Gates Common Room.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">&ldquo;The Writing Center was her baby,&rdquo; said English Professor Barry Sarchett, who came to the college in 1981, at first to teach half time and work in the newly established writing program. He recalled Barton&rsquo;s &ldquo;seductive Texas drawl&rdquo; when she aimed to persuade.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">&ldquo;She was larger than life,&rdquo; Sarchett said.&nbsp; &ldquo;We all missed her when she was retired, and now we&rsquo;ll miss her even more.&rdquo; The Writing Center has a video tribute to Barton that can be viewed at <a href="http://youtu.be/RFFaKDLHn4M">http://youtu.be/RFFaKDLHn4M</a> </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">Barton, known for her love of poetry and her dedication to students, first began teaching at CC in 1964 as a lecturer in English. &nbsp;&nbsp;Faculty and students alike recall her kindness and fearlessness as she navigated turbulent decades of change at the college.&nbsp; </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">Former students remember a generous teacher who took them seriously.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">&ldquo;She was the first person who ever told me I could be a writer,&rdquo; said Michael Nava &lsquo;76, a Stanford-educated lawyer whose books include a series of well-regarded detective novels featuring Henry Rios, a gay criminal defense lawyer.&nbsp; &ldquo;She gave me permission to go about fulfilling that ambition.&rdquo;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">Nava&rsquo;s first class at CC was a two-block creative writing course with Barton.&nbsp; &ldquo;She was a monumentally important person to me,&rdquo; Nava said. &ldquo;She not only encouraged my writing, but also understood my position at the school, as a poor scholarship boy in a school that was basically middle and upper-class.&rdquo;<br /></span><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">A specialist in late 19<sup>th</sup> and early 20<sup>th</sup> century poetry, Barton wrote her dissertation on W.B. Yeats at the University of Wisconsin.&nbsp; It was in a class on the romantic poets that Molly Gross &rsquo;96, now associate director of the Writing Center, felt emboldened as a writer.&nbsp;<br /><br /></span><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">&ldquo;She encouraged risk-taking, a creative approach to writing,&rdquo; Gross said.&nbsp; &ldquo;But she was rigorous, too. She was really good at guiding, ushering you along the way, even if neither of us knew where you were going.&rdquo;<br /><br /></span><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small;">Early on, Barton lobbied for a college-wide writing program, which began in the mid-70s when a professor was freed for a block to help students.&nbsp; By 1979, the faculty approved an all-college writing program, including what became the Writing Center, &ldquo;to help all students write more clearly, cogently, and gracefully by offering a wide variety of writing opportunities,&rdquo; Barton wrote in 1988. She recruited faculty by holding monthly lunches to discuss teaching writing.&nbsp; In the early days, she invited new faculty to retreats at the Baca to discuss teaching writing. &nbsp;Her husband, the late Tom K. Barton, professor emeritus of history, shared her conviction that writing is central to learning.</span></p> Ruth Barton, Guiding Force in Journalism at CC, Dies at 78 Thu, 29 Nov 2012 15:43:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/ruth-barton-guiding-force-in-journalism-at-cc-dies-at-78 http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/ruth-barton-guiding-force-in-journalism-at-cc-dies-at-78 <p>Professor Emerita Ruth Barton, the guiding force in the early years of the Writing Center, the journalism program, Cutler Publications, and a host of other writing-related endeavors at Colorado College, died Friday, Nov. 23. She was 78.</p> <p>Barton, known for her love of poetry and her dedication to students, first began teaching at CC in 1964 as a lecturer in English. &nbsp;&nbsp;Faculty and students alike recall her kindness and fearlessness as she navigated turbulent decades of change at the college.&nbsp; <em></em></p> <p>Former students remember a generous teacher who took them seriously.</p> <p>&ldquo;She was the first person who ever told me I could be a writer,&rdquo; said Michael Nava &lsquo;76, a Stanford-educated lawyer whose books include a series of well-regarded detective novels featuring Henry Rios, a gay criminal defense lawyer.&nbsp; &ldquo;She gave me permission to go about fulfilling that ambition.&rdquo;</p> <p>Nava&rsquo;s first class at CC was a two-block creative writing course with Barton.&nbsp; &ldquo;She was a monumentally important person to me,&rdquo; Nava said. &ldquo;She not only encouraged my writing, but also understood my position at the school, as a poor scholarship boy in a school that was basically middle and upper-class.&rdquo;</p> <p>A specialist in late 19<sup>th</sup> and early 20<sup>th</sup> century poetry, Barton wrote her dissertation on W.B. Yeats at the University of Wisconsin.&nbsp; It was in a class on the romantic poets that Molly Gross &rsquo;96, now associate director of the Writing Center, felt emboldened as a writer.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;She encouraged risk-taking, a creative approach to writing,&rdquo; Gross said.&nbsp; &ldquo;But she was rigorous, too. She was really good at guiding, ushering you along the way, even if neither of us knew where you were going.&rdquo;</p> <p>Early on, Barton lobbied for a college-wide writing program, which began in the mid-70s when a professor was freed for a block to help students.&nbsp; By 1979, the faculty approved an all-college writing program, including what became the Writing Center, &ldquo;to help all students write more clearly, cogently, and gracefully by offering a wide variety of writing opportunities,&rdquo; Barton wrote in 1988. She recruited faculty by holding monthly lunches to discuss teaching writing.&nbsp; In the early days, she invited new faculty to retreats at the Baca to discuss teaching writing. &nbsp;Her husband, the late Tom K. Barton, professor emeritus of history, shared her conviction that writing is central to learning.</p> <p>&ldquo;The Writing Center was her baby,&rdquo; said English Professor Barry Sarchett, who came to the college in 1981, at first to teach half time and work in the newly established writing program. He recalled Barton&rsquo;s &ldquo;seductive Texas drawl&rdquo; when she aimed to persuade.</p> <p>&ldquo;She was larger than life,&rdquo; Sarchett said.&nbsp; &ldquo;We all missed her when she was retired, and now we&rsquo;ll miss her even more.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Writing Center will be renamed in her honor in a ceremony on Friday, Dec. 7, at noon, in the Learning Commons, Tutt Library 166.</p> <p>A memorial service will be held in Shove Chapel at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8, with a reception afterward in Gates Common Room.</p>