Colorado College News: Comparative Literature http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-rss-news.html?cat=comparativeliterature, Professor Emeritus Herving Madruga Passes Away Wed, 18 Jan 2017 11:00:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/professor-emeritus-herving-madruga-passes-away http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/professor-emeritus-herving-madruga-passes-away ]]> <p>Professor Emeritus of French and Italian Herving Madruga passed away on Sunday, Jan. 15, at his home in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, after a long illness. A native of Cuba, he joined the Colorado College faculty in 1958. He received his B.A. (1952) and M.A. (1954) from Harvard University, a Certificat de Phonetique from the University of Paris, France in 1954; and his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado in 1965. He retired in 1994.</p> <p>During his time at CC, he was instrumental in helping found and direct the Program in Comparative Literature, along with helping start the Italian program.&nbsp; A beloved professor, Herving was fluent in six languages and inspired students&rsquo; love of language and literature. &nbsp;His co-teaching of the introductory course and of advanced seminars on subjects such as the turn of the [20th] century were legendary.&nbsp;He also is known for his French theatre productions.</p> <p>Friends of Herving suggest that donations be made in his memory to the Felisa Llorente Spanish Book Award Fund at Colorado College. Donations also can be made to the&nbsp;Herving Madruga Professor Emeritus Endowed Scholarship, which provides need-based support for student study of European cultures.&nbsp;A simple gathering for Herving will be held at a later date.&nbsp;</p> 3 Students Receive ACM-CIC Mellon Fellowships Mon, 09 May 2016 14:30:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/3-students-receive-acm-cic-mellon-fellowships http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/3-students-receive-acm-cic-mellon-fellowships <p>Three Colorado College students, <strong>Atiya Harvey &rsquo;18, </strong><strong>Brittany Camacho </strong><strong>&rsquo;18</strong>, and <strong>Maja Orlowska </strong><strong>&rsquo;19</strong>, have been awarded ACM-CIC Mellon&nbsp;Graduate School Exploration fellowships.</p> <p>As part of the fellowship, Harvey, a feminist and gender studies major from Washington, D.C., Camacho, a classics-history-politics major from Roselle Park, New Jersey, and Orlowska, a comparative literature and Romance languages major from Cedarburg, Wisconsin, will participate in a professional development conference this summer. The students also will receive structured mentoring in their junior year, a paid summer research internship next summer at one of the CIC universities, and a student research/professional development conference at the end of the internship summer.</p> <p>The fellowship is a part of an $8.1 million grant from the Mellon Foundation awarded to the Associated Colleges of the Midwest (ACM) and the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) for the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.acm.edu/professional_development/Funding_Opportunities/Fellows_Program.html">Undergraduate and Faculty Fellows Program for a Diverse Professoriate</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;It is great to partner with our ACM consortium colleagues to enrich the summer research opportunities for CC students,&rdquo; says Emily Chan, associate dean of academic programs and strategic initiatives. &ldquo;In the fall of 2013 Colorado College received a grant from the Mellon Foundation to enhance our faculty/student collaborative research in the humanities and humanistic social science. This new fellowship will now bring off-campus options for our students, in addition to our own Summer Collaborative Research Program.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> The ACM and CIC have embarked on a seven-year initiative to address barriers to faculty diversity in the humanities, humanistic social sciences, and arts, especially in the context of liberal arts colleges. The program aims to create new structures for collaboration between undergraduate and graduate programs at the 14 liberal arts colleges in the ACM and the 15 research universities in the CIC, which includes the members of the Big Ten Conference and the University of Chicago.</p> CC Students Assist Refugees While in Greece Mon, 02 Nov 2015 14:00:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-students-assist-refugees-while-in-greece http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-students-assist-refugees-while-in-greece ]]> <p>The 25 Colorado College students taking Lisa Hughes&rsquo; interdisciplinary course Romantic Comedy: The Birth, Death, and Re-birth during Block 2 in Greece were struck by the plight of refugees, and vowed to help. With broad support from CC students, faculty, staff, alumni, student clubs, and athletic teams, the students raised more than $2,250 to buy necessities for the refugees fleeing through Greece. The CC Chaplain&rsquo;s Office handled the money and served as the liaison for the funds raised.</p> <p><strong>Kendall Rock &rsquo;15</strong> worked with The Salvation Army in Athens to determine what the refugees most needed. The students then purchased and distributed supplies such as diapers, toys, baby wipes, feminine napkins, hand sanitizer, snacks, hats, socks, backpacks, and rain and cold weather gear to the refugees in Victoria Square in Athens.</p> <p>&ldquo;Even as we studied romantic comedy from its birth and rebirth in the Mediterranean, we considered the sea as a character, with all of its ambiguity and capacity for death and rebirth,&rdquo; said Hughes, chair of CC&rsquo;s Comparative Literature Department.&nbsp;&ldquo;The Mediterranean in particular both separates people and connects them, and we saw how much the sea can be a source of connection and life and hope. And we wanted to be a part of that.&rdquo; &nbsp;The course explored the development of&nbsp;representations of love and comedy from Homer and Plato to contemporary cinema.&nbsp;</p> Today Show, NY Post Cover CC Half-Block Class Thu, 22 Jan 2015 12:30:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/today-show-ny-post-cover-cc-half-block-class http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/today-show-ny-post-cover-cc-half-block-class ]]> <p>A nine-day Half Block course titled Queen Bees, WannaBees, and Mean Girls has been featured on the <a href="http://www.today.com/video/today/56842000">TODAY Show</a> and in the <i><a href="http://nypost.com/2015/01/19/college-class-teaches-students-how-to-be-a-mean-girl/">New York Post.</a></i> The course, taught by Lisa Hughes in the Comparative Literature Department, explores the means and motives of women seeking authority and the actions they are willing to take in order to hold onto it. Hughes, a classics scholar, and her students note that &ldquo;mean girls&rdquo; is not a new phenomenon; it has been going on more than 3,000 years.</p> <p>The students read Machiavelli&rsquo;s &ldquo;The<i> </i>Prince&rdquo;; other texts studied included Jane Austen&rsquo;s &ldquo;Pride and Prejudice,&rdquo; Margaret Atwood&rsquo;s &ldquo;The Penelopiad,&rdquo; David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson&rsquo;s &ldquo;Film Art,&rdquo; the poetry of Semonides of Amorgos and Sappho of Lesbos, and from Greek mythology, Ovid&rsquo;s Circe, Scylla, Arachne, and Athena.</p> <p>The course title is taken from the Tina Fey movie, &ldquo;Mean Girls,&rdquo; based on the 2002 novel &ldquo;Queen Bees and Wannabes&rdquo; by Rosalind Wiseman, parenting educator and creator of the Owning Up Curriculum, a program that teaches students and educators to take responsibility as bystanders, perpetrators, and victims of unethical behavior</p> Half-Block Course Featured in NY Post Tue, 20 Jan 2015 10:30:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/half-block-course-featured-in-ny-post http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/half-block-course-featured-in-ny-post <p>A nine-day Half Block course titled Queen Bees, WannaBees, and Mean Girls has been featured in the <i><a href="http://nypost.com/2015/01/19/college-class-teaches-students-how-to-be-a-mean-girl/">New York Post.</a></i> The course, taught by Lisa Hughes in the Comparative Literature Department, explores the means and motives of women seeking authority and the actions they are willing to take in order to hold onto it.</p> <p>The students read Machiavelli&rsquo;s &ldquo;The<i> </i>Prince&rdquo;; other texts studied included Jane Austen&rsquo;s &ldquo;Pride and Prejudice,&rdquo; Margaret Atwood&rsquo;s &ldquo;The Penelopiad,&rdquo; David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson&rsquo;s &ldquo;Film Art,&rdquo; the poetry of Semonides of Amorgos and Sappho of Lesbos, and from Greek mythology, Ovid&rsquo;s Circe, Scylla, Arachne, and Athena.</p> <p>The course title is taken from the Tina Fey movie, &ldquo;Mean Girls,&rdquo; based on the 2002 novel &ldquo;Queen Bees and Wannabes&rdquo; by Rosalind Wiseman, parenting educator and creator of the Owning Up Curriculum, a program that teaches students and educators to take responsibility as bystanders, perpetrators, and victims of unethical behavior. Colorado College's Half-Block program is held during the winter break.</p> Student, Faculty Collaborate on Comparative Literature Research Tue, 19 Aug 2014 17:54:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/student-faculty-collaborate-on-comparative-literature-research http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/student-faculty-collaborate-on-comparative-literature-research ]]> <p><strong>Han Sayles &rsquo;15</strong>, a comparative literature major at Colorado College with a focus in Feminist and Gender Studies and a minor in Spanish, is working with Maytag Professor of Comparative Literature Corinne Scheiner on the 2014 Report on the Undergraduate Comparative Literature Curriculum. The report, an update on a 2005 report commissioned by the Association of Departments and Programs of Comparative Literature (ADPCL) and the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA), collects data on the number of formal undergraduate programs that grant a bachelor of arts in comparative literature and on the structure of the major and the minor.&nbsp; It also examines three major issues and their effects on the undergraduate curriculum:</p> <ul> <li>The institutional location of comparative literature</li> <li>The rise of Global Studies</li> <li>The rise of Visual Studies, Film Studies, and New Media Studies</li> </ul> <p>The research project has been rewarding beyond what Sayles imagined. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m interested in the questions being asked, but also I&rsquo;m learning new skills. I&rsquo;m taking raw data and interpreting it; finding meaning in numbers and learning how to do statistical analysis,&rdquo; she said.<br /><br />Scheiner said comparative literature often is thought of as a graduate discipline, given that it requires a high level of proficiency in multiple languages. In fact, many question whether it is possible to teach comparative literature at the undergraduate level without it becoming simply &ldquo;world literature in translation,&rdquo; she said. The 2005 report was the first attempt in more than 30 years to study the undergraduate comparative literature curricula at different institutions.<br /><br />Scheiner wanted to work with undergraduate student researchers on the project for a variety of reasons: Given that the report examines undergraduate curricula, Scheiner wanted to have the report come out of an undergraduate institution; she wanted to demonstrate that the students were capable of doing a high level of work; and she wanted to show that a liberal arts college was capable of supporting such a project.<br /><br />&ldquo;Working with undergraduates as research assistants, particularly at an institution like Colorado College, necessitates our thinking about them not as working solely or primarily with content, but also applying the skills they have learned as part of their liberal arts education to any project on which they work,&rdquo; she said.<br /><br />&ldquo;It&rsquo;s been eye-opening,&rdquo; Sayles said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m finding that precision in writing translates to data skills I didn&rsquo;t realize I had.&rdquo;<br /><br />Sayles will accompany Scheiner to annual meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association in March, where Sayles will present the report&rsquo;s findings. By the time she graduates in May, Sayles, co-editor-in-chief of the <em>Cipher</em>, a student alternative news magazine, co-manager of the SOCC, a student radio station, and an assistant producer at KRCC, Colorado College&rsquo;s NPR-member station, will have a scholarly report and national convention presentation to her credit.<br /><br />&ldquo;The most rewarding part is showing off our students and showing what they can do,&rdquo; Scheiner said. &ldquo;The best thing I can do is let our students stand up in front of a group of my colleagues and show them what an undergraduate liberal arts student can do. They can hold their own and more.&rdquo;</p> <p>And what will be&nbsp;the gist of Sayles&rsquo; presentation? Hard data shows that contrary to anecdotes and popular belief, the number of colleges and universities offering a bachelor of arts in comparative literature has increased in the past 10 years.</p> <p><br /><br /></p> Three Faculty Members Promoted to Full Professor Mon, 12 May 2014 14:15:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/three-faculty-members-promoted-to-professor http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/three-faculty-members-promoted-to-professor <p>The Board of Trustees approved several items during their May meeting, including the promotion of three Colorado College faculty members to full professor. They are Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry&nbsp;Neena Grover; Associate Professor of Anthropology Sarah Hautzinger; and Associate Professor of Anthropology Corinne Scheiner.<br /><br />In addition, six retiring faculty members were granted emeritus status. They are Professor of Religion David Weddle; Professor of Environmental Science Walt&nbsp;Hecox; Professor of German Richard Koc; Senior Lecturer in Japanese Paul Maruyama; Professor of Music Stephen Scott; and Professor of German Armin Wishard.</p> Marissa Rivera receives comparative literature prize Wed, 29 Feb 2012 16:39:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/marissa-rivera-receives-comparative-literature-prize http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/marissa-rivera-receives-comparative-literature-prize ]]> <p>Marissa Rivera, a 2011 <em>cum laude</em> graduate of Colorado College, has been awarded the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) Presidential Undergraduate Prize.&nbsp;Members of CC&rsquo;s comparative literature department nominated her paper, a revised version of her senior thesis, &ldquo;Reflexive Revisionism: Latin American Magical Realism and Australian Postcoloniality in Gould&rsquo;s Book of&nbsp;Fish,&rdquo;<em> </em>which she wrote under the guidance of Assistant Spanish Professor Andreea Marinescu and Associate Comparative Literature Professor Corinne Scheiner. Rivera currently is a Peace Corps volunteer, serving in China.</p> <p>The committee for the Presidential Undergraduate Prize stated that &ldquo;work will be judged based on theoretical rigor, comparative breadth, and lucidity of exposition.&rdquo; The committee also noted that work that engages in comparison across linguistic boundaries is especially valued. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> CC professor to lecture at Icarus Festival Fri, 13 Jan 2012 14:23:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-professor-to-lecture-at-icarus-festival http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-professor-to-lecture-at-icarus-festival ]]> <p>Adjunct Associate Professor of Literature Lisa B. Hughes will give the inaugural lecture on mythology this summer at the 7th Annual Icarus Festival for Dialogue Between Cultures. Begun as a celebration of international music, the Icarus Festival, held on the Greek island of Ikaria, has grown to include art, theater, dance, cinema, and classical mythology. The festival runs from mid-July to mid-August, and Hughes will be speaking on cosmogony and theogony from July 13-16.</p> Colorado College students compete in old-school Olympics -- in Greece Wed, 20 Aug 2008 23:51:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/colorado-college-students-compete-in-old-school-olympics----in-greece http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/colorado-college-students-compete-in-old-school-olympics----in-greece <p><span style="font-size: 10pt; line-height: 115%;" new=""><font color="#000000">Fifteen Colorado College students in the class &quot;Naked Olympics - The Spirit of Greek Competition&quot; taught in Greece by Lisa B. Hughes, professor of literature, participated in the Nemea Games 2008 this summer. Hughes and Barry Sarchett, CC professor of English, also competed. The Nemean Games, held in ancient Olympia every four years since their revival in 1996, commemorate the ancient Greek games. The participants, ranging from ages 10 to 80, are not professional athletes, compete barefoot, and are awarded with palm branches and wild celery instead of medals. In this year's events, with&nbsp;more than 500 participants,&nbsp;CC senior&nbsp;Emily Steffen&nbsp;walked away with a first-place celery crown. Pictured&nbsp;here, from left, Sara Roggensack,&nbsp;Steffen, Maya Webber, Giulia Hines and Kallie Pollard swept the first five places in their age group. Steffen, who won the 87-meter (285-f,oot) race, was featured in a USAToday.com <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/travel/cruises/item.aspx?type=photo&amp;photo_id=07dwaWR1NEgGY&amp;tid=0d2L2Fe4qAf0k&amp;pn=8 ">blog</a> about the games. In the second photo, CC students train for their events.</font></span></p>