Colorado College News http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-rss-news.html FAC Encourages Exploration by Expanding Access to the Arts Mon, 19 Feb 2018 00:00:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/fac-encourages-exploration-by-expanding-access-to-the-arts http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/fac-encourages-exploration-by-expanding-access-to-the-arts <p><b>What&rsquo;s Happening</b>: The&nbsp;<a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/csfac/">strategic plan for the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College</a> is guided by three themes: Excellence, Access, and Collaboration and centered around six recommendations. Implementation of the strategic plan across the FAC&rsquo;s programs has already led to significant progress.</p> <p>Since July 1, nearly 50,000 people have visited the FAC to see the museum, attend a theatre performance, take a class or a tour, or participate in a public program or event. This winter, the production of &ldquo;Annie&rdquo; closed as the most attended and highest grossing production in FAC history with more than 10,300 tickets issued, exceeding its budgeted goal by over 150 percent.</p> <p>In January 2018, the FAC launched a free K-12 school tour program and the volume of interest and inquiries has increased exponentially, with several area schools already taking advantage of the program, bringing in students who have never before visited a museum. And, the FAC has seen more than 600 new family memberships since September for the 4th grade Passport to the Arts program.</p> <p>&ldquo;Many students in my class had never been to an art museum,&rdquo; says Lara Ash, a third grade teacher at High Plains Elementary who took advantage of the FAC&rsquo;s free school program this year. &ldquo;I believe it is so important to help youth see life though many different perspectives. Exposure to the arts encourages students to think differently and see things through many different lenses.&rdquo;</p> <p>Ash says her students returned to the classroom to talk and write about their experience &ldquo;It helps remind students that learning occurs everywhere, not just a classroom. It also offered us an opportunity to write about a real-life experience; having those opportunities often feels rare.&rdquo;</p> <p class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe width="685" height="385" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hUnRovFSOow?rel=0" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Implementation of the strategic plan within the Bemis School of Art will begin in July 2018. Building on the work of the 2016-17 planning subcommittee for the Bemis School of Art and guided by the six recommendations in the strategic plan, the Bemis School of Art Implementation Committee will develop specific initiatives and tactics (what will be done and how). The work of the committee will be guided by four questions: What new programming could be offered that would promote enhanced access and collaboration between the various communities of Colorado Springs, FAC, and Colorado College?; What initiatives would bring collaboration and integration of the programs within the Bemis School of Art and the college&rsquo;s Arts and Crafts programs?; How might existing programming transition to be aligned with the six recommendations and themes of the strategic plan?; What structure can you envision that would promote collaboration across the FAC and college community?</p> <p>Additionally, the FAC was accepted into the Kennedy Center Partners in Education Program, which pairs arts organizations and local school systems for a two-year commitment to establish or expand professional learning programs in the arts for teachers. The FAC&rsquo;s local partnership team is one of only about 14 accepted across the country.</p> Thinking Creatively About Summer Opportunities at CC Mon, 19 Feb 2018 00:00:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/thinking-creatively-about-summer-opportunities-at-cc http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/thinking-creatively-about-summer-opportunities-at-cc <p>Faculty members at Colorado College are experts at teaching focused, immersive courses in 3.5 weeks. Colorado is a beautiful place to learn and live in the summer and provides a plethora of opportunities for outdoor adventure. The college&rsquo;s strategic initiative to, &ldquo;build a nationally recognized summer program for a new generation of learners,&rdquo; supports CC&rsquo;s broader mission of providing the finest liberal arts education in the country.</p> <p><b>What&rsquo;s Happening</b>: A Summer Strategic Plan Project Team convened in Block 1 to develop recommendations that will make Colorado College&rsquo;s summer program a model of effective use of summer months at a liberal arts institution and will move forward goals of ensuring student access, retention, persistence, and thriving.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s exciting to work with faculty and staff that look at the summer as a time to develop new courses and test new programs that draw connections between academic work and summer opportunities,&rdquo; says Jim Burke, director of Summer Session and chair of the project team. &ldquo;Refreshing the strategic plan for summer programs provides an opportunity for me and my colleagues working over the summer months to think creatively about how we more intentionally address students&rsquo; needs at the end of the academic year.&rdquo;</p> <p>Burke says the report&rsquo;s recommendation put CC in a position to build a nationally recognized summer program that offers in-demand courses, provides new course schedules that accommodate students working summer jobs and internships, and develops linkages between academic-year and summer programs to support year-round learning and engagement.</p> <p>&ldquo;A priority for me will be to ensure the summer months provide space for students or faculty to pursue new academic opportunities, whether conducting research with faculty, taking an elective course outside their major, test-driving a new course, or bolstering an existing course with field work that allows students to enjoy the beautiful summer months in Colorado,&rdquo; says Burke. &ldquo;Summer is a dynamic time to be on campus and I look forward to developing more opportunities for our students.&rdquo; <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/offices/presidentsoffice/block-projects.html">Read the full report</a>.</p> <p>Additionally, stemming from one of the Block Project team&rsquo;s recommendations, a new committee will soon be formed to facilitate collaboration and engagement among all departments and academic units offering summer programs at CC. The Campuswide Committee on Summer Programming will serve as an ongoing advisory group to guide the development of a plan to fulfil the recommendations made by the Block Project team. The plan will build on and refine the central elements of these recommendations and develop a more operational plan to coordinate summer programming, avoid redundant efforts, and raise institutional priorities that should be addressed in the summer months.</p> <p>Summer at CC includes the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/bridgescholarsprogram/">Bridge</a> and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/other/gsp/">Global Scholars</a> programs,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/offices/dean/students/research-opportunities/summer-programming/">Summer Collaborative Research</a> (SCoRe), <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/offices/international/off-campus-study/summer-off-campus/">off-campus study abroad</a>, <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/offices/summersession/CC-students/">on-campus classes</a>, the <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/offices/summersession/pre-college/">pre-college program</a>, sports camps, and the <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/other/summermusicfestival/">Summer Music Festival</a>.</p> <p>Also extending the reach of the Block Plan is the nine-day <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/other/half-block/">Half Block</a>. In January 2018, CC hosted its most successful Half Block yet, with 835 students enrolled in 20 non-credit and 27 for-credit courses.</p> CC Has a Record Seven Fulbright Semifinalists Mon, 19 Feb 2018 00:00:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-has-a-record-seven-fulbright-semifinalists http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-has-a-record-seven-fulbright-semifinalists <p>Colorado College has seven Fulbright semifinalists this year, topping last year&rsquo;s five semifinalists, which at the time was believed to be a school record. This year Colorado College has five English Teaching Assistant semifinalists, one Study/Research Grant semifinalist, and one National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowship semifinalist.</p> <p>Making it to the semifinalist round is a significant accomplishment in the Fulbright competition, and means that the&nbsp;applications&nbsp;have been&nbsp;forwarded by the Fulbright National Screening Committee to the Fulbright Commission or U.S. Embassy in the host country for final review. Finalists will be notified later this spring, with the timing of notifications varying by country.</p> <p>Colorado College&rsquo;s 2018 Fulbright semifinalists are:</p> <ul> <li><strong>David Andrews &rsquo;18,</strong> <a href="https://us.fulbrightonline.org/countries/selectedprogram/264">English Teaching Assistant, Uruguay</a>. Andrews is a creative writing major who tutors in CC&rsquo;s Writing Center and has previously taught English to elementary and middle school students in Chile.&nbsp; He has received grants to translate works by poet Nicanor Parra as well as write his own poetry. As an ETA in Uruguay Andrews hope to use poetry writing groups and workshops to build community in and outside the school.&nbsp; He plans to put to use the Spanish language and cross-cultural education skills he gains as an ETA in Uruguay in his future career as an educator in his home state of Colorado, focusing on &ldquo;an education-based solution to Colorado&rsquo;s urban-rural divide.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Amanda Cahn &rsquo;17</strong>, <a href="https://us.fulbrightonline.org/countries/selectedprogram/36">English Teaching Assistant, Indonesia</a>. A two-time Fulbright semifinalist, Cahn currently is in Chile, teaching English to schoolchildren and Spanish to immigrants from Haiti.&nbsp; Her long-term goal is to work toward reducing inequality and improving international relationships through an organization such as the United Nations Development Program. Should she receive the Fulbright, Cahn hopes to gain &ldquo;insights into gender roles, cultural traditions, and changing ideas&rdquo; in Indonesian society, giving her &ldquo;perspectives that would be relevant to a future career in foreign affairs.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Soren Frykholm &rsquo;16</strong>, <a href="https://us.fulbrightonline.org/countries/selectedprogram/86">English Teaching Assistant, Brazil</a>. CC men&rsquo;s soccer team captain and <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/soren-frykholm-16-named-scac-man-of-the-year">2016-2017 Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference Man of the Year</a>, Frykholm has taught English as a GED tutor in the U.S. and as a volunteer instructor in Brazil.&nbsp; Frykholm also plans to draw on his experiences in learning three languages himself (Portuguese, Spanish, and Latin) to create &ldquo;a fun, conversation-driven learning environment&rdquo; that will &ldquo;instill confidence in my students and a willingness to take risks as they become comfortable communicating in English.&rdquo; Recipient of <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/ncaa-honors-soren-frykholm-16-with-jim-mckay-scholarship">two prestigious postgraduate scholarships from the NCAA</a>, which will defer should he receive the Fulbright, Frykholm sees a future for himself in education: &ldquo;Be it language instructor, soccer coach, or public school teacher, I see this type of role as a means of shaping the future.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Jin Mei McMahon &rsquo;17</strong>, <a href="https://us.fulbrightonline.org/about/types-of-awards/fulbright-national-geographic-digital-storytelling-fellowship">National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowship</a>. McMahon designed a two-country project titled &ldquo;A Transational Diaspora: Stories of International Adoption,&rdquo;&nbsp;a project falls under the National Geographic theme of the human journey in considering that &ldquo;international adoption is a form of migration that constitutes changes in geography, identity, and lifestyle.&rdquo; McMahon proposes to &ldquo;take the overarching narrative of an adoptee&rsquo;s migration and break it down to reveal these aspects: the policies that control adoption, why one adoptee chooses to embrace their heritage and one doesn&rsquo;t, and the reasons families adopt or give up their children&rdquo; by sharing, through photo essays and articles, the experiences of South Korean birth parents, Swedish adoptive parents, and adoptees.&nbsp; At the conclusion of the fellowship, she would work to expand this project to China, Ethiopia, and the United States. This is a highly competitive special program; last year 233 applicants vied for only five awards.</li> <li><strong>Ashley Merscher &rsquo;08</strong>, <a href="https://us.fulbrightonline.org/countries/selectedprogram/194">English Teaching Assistant, Slovak Republic</a>. Merscher has been teaching English abroad since 2015, first in Hungary and currently in Spain, which she says has changed her life&rsquo;s trajectory to one focused on education.&nbsp; As an ETA in the Slovak Republic, Merscher hopes &ldquo;to offer the tool of language to recovering communities in Central/Eastern Europe,&rdquo; noting that &ldquo;English, as a common international language, can facilitate tolerance, connection, empathy, and open up a (literal) world of opportunities.&rdquo;&nbsp; Should she receive the Fulbright grant, Merscher plans to lead projects in environmental education, both in the Slovak Republic and once she returns to the United States.&nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Jared Russell &rsquo;18</strong>, <a href="https://us.fulbrightonline.org/countries/selectedprogram/275">Anne Wexler Master&rsquo;s Award in Public Policy, Australia</a>. Russell hopes to use this graduate study award to sit for a Master&rsquo;s of Public Policy at the University of Melbourne, where he would examine &ldquo;the relationship between climate change and the current U.N. definition of refugee status&rdquo; in order &ldquo;to engage with policy work in the south Pacific region . . . to implement policies to address the emergence of climate change refugees.&rdquo; This builds on his previous volunteer work in immigration law and victim advocacy, his studies last summer in Denmark as a <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/jared-russell-18-named-humanity-in-action-fellow#.WoIiTCXwZaQ">Humanity in Action Fellow</a>, and his PIFP position researching health care policy for the Colorado Department of Health.&nbsp; After his Fulbright year, Russell, a current Writing Center tutor and double major in political science and philosophy, plans to attend law school and specialize in international human rights.</li> <li><strong>Susie Simmons &rsquo;18</strong>, <a href="https://us.fulbrightonline.org/countries/selectedprogram/109">English Teaching Assistant, Panama</a>. Simmons taught reading last summer as part of Generation Teach, where she experienced the positive impact of &ldquo;meaningful relationships [between teachers and students] that engage, encourage, and excite students to learn.&rdquo;&nbsp; As an ETA, Simmons says she would like to couple structured classroom activities with opportunity for joy in order to foster student confidence.&nbsp; To further engage with the local community in Panama, Simmons hopes to learn applique techniques and needlework from Panamanian <em>mola</em> artists in order to explore their arts&rsquo; societal significance and its meaning in their individual lives. These experiences in and out of the ETA classroom would help prepare her to &ldquo;become a culturally and linguistically competent ESL teacher&rdquo; after her Fulbright year, she says.</li> </ul> <p>Of CC&rsquo;s five Fulbright semifinalists last year, two went on to become Fulbright finalists: <strong>Teddy Corwin &rsquo;17</strong>, a mathematics and economics major and German minor, who received a Fulbright to Germany, and <strong>Sidharth Tripathi &rsquo;17,</strong> who received the Erasmus Mundus scholarship award and a Fulbright to the Czech Republic. Also named as 2017 Fulbright semifinalists were <strong>Thomas Roberts &rsquo;17</strong>, <strong>Madelene Travis &rsquo;17</strong>, and Cahn, who is a semifinalist again this year.<br /><br />The Fulbright U.S. Student Program is the largest U.S. exchange program offering opportunities for students and young professionals to undertake international graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and primary and secondary school teaching worldwide. The program currently awards approximately 1,900 grants annually in all fields of study, and operates in more than 140 countries worldwide.</p> Not Just a Good Idea Fri, 16 Feb 2018 15:45:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/not-just-a-good-idea http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/not-just-a-good-idea ]]> <p>The seed of the idea for Chica Chocolate was planted long before <strong>Cassidy Lam &rsquo;19</strong>&nbsp;came to Colorado College, and her best friend Elise Morgan was there from the start.</p> <p>Lam and Morgan, a student at the University of Colorado-Boulder, have been friends since seventh-grade gym class. Hanging out back then sometimes meant spending time together at Lam&rsquo;s father&rsquo;s acupuncture clinic. Among other things, her dad was using an herbal formula to treat patients who had complications with their menstrual cycles. However, some patients thought the Chinese herbs tasted bad and resisted taking them regularly. Then Lam&rsquo;s dad met a friend who was getting his single-sourced, fair-trade chocolate business off the ground. That&rsquo;s when the idea struck to blend the nasty-tasting herbs with sumptuous high-quality chocolate.</p> <p>&ldquo;The concept was to create a medicine that went down with a spoonful of sugar, basically. Elise and I adopted the idea,&rdquo; Lam says.</p> <p>But without Colorado College&rsquo;s Big Idea startup pitch competition, Lam isn&rsquo;t so sure they would have been successful in developing it further than just an idea. The Big Idea is a startup pitch competition where teams of CC students propose entrepreneurial ventures to a panel of judges for the chance to win a piece of the $50,000 prize money to fund their project.</p> <p>&ldquo;Before, it was just an idea; the Big Idea gave us the financial resources and deadline to get started on making it happen,&rdquo; Lam says. &ldquo;It motivated us to sit down and discover how to talk about our idea and define what would be our minimum viable product.&rdquo;</p> <p>Last year, Chica Chocolate took second place in the Big Idea and they returned this year to take first place and $25,000 in prize money at the sixth annual Big Idea competition, held Feb. 8 in the Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center.</p> <p>The company&rsquo;s chocolate truffles are infused with a Chinese herbal formula designed to promote hormone balance, and are delivered to customers on a subscription basis.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s validating to have the support and realization that other people believe in what we&rsquo;re doing and think it&rsquo;s worthwhile,&rdquo; says Lam,&nbsp;an international political economy major and Chinese minor. &ldquo;We had more to lose this year; we&rsquo;ve already built something and believe so strongly in our idea and are so passionate about the mission of our work.&rdquo;</p> <p>Seventeen teams registered for the Big Idea pitch competition in December, says CC Director of Innovation<strong>&nbsp;Dez</strong>&nbsp;<strong>Stone Menendez &rsquo;02</strong>. Of those, nine advanced to the semifinals in January and five made it to the finals. Additionally, several of the teams in previous competitions are still in operation, including Spindle, Flyphone, Colorado Springs Food Rescue, and Ogugu.</p> <p>Participating in the Big Idea is a big undertaking with a potentially huge payoff. Each team that registers for the Big Idea is required to develop four documents as part of the competitive process: a core value statement, a one- to two-page executive summary of the startup, a slide presentation deck, and a business model spreadsheet.</p> <p>But these are college students, not seasoned businesspeople, so along the way, CC provides a lot of resources for them to draw from.</p> <p>One of these was the Big Idea Half-Block course, held in January between Winter Break and the official start of the Spring Semester. Taught by Menendez and Jake Eichengreen, executive director of the Quad Innovation Partnership, this workshop covered every element required to successfully compete in the Big Idea. The class, which was optional for teams entering the competition, took participants through an entrepreneurial boot camp, leading students from business idea to viable presentation and business model. The first week broke down the components needed to enter the competition, helping teams create their mission statements and executive summaries, and refining their ideas. The rest of the course had them creating their comprehensive slideshow presentation, called a &ldquo;pitch deck&rdquo; in the startup world.</p> <p>To help prepare students to present, the class participated in the Career Center session &ldquo;Improv Theatre, the Job Market, and You&rdquo; led by <strong>Anne Braatas &rsquo;76</strong>, where they played improv games to help boost their confidence and energy while pitching. The students also practiced their pitches multiple times, presenting to each other and the instructors.</p> <p>There also were pitch practice runs for those Big Idea semi-finalists were who not taking the class, as well as opportunities for formal feedback at the rough draft stage.</p> <p>Taking second place in the competition and netting $15,000 in seed money was Raw Sauce, led by environmental science major&nbsp;<strong>Alex Harros &rsquo;18</strong>&nbsp;and geology major&nbsp;<strong>George Fowlkes &rsquo;18.</strong>&nbsp;Raw Sauce is a sustainable fermented foods business with a goal of internally sourcing produce through their own hydroponic grow operation. The company tries to create food that causes no unnecessary harm from seed to sauce. To help convince the judges of the probiotic product&rsquo;s merit, the team presented the judging panel, consisting of four Colorado College alumni and a retired entrepreneur, with chips and a sampling of the sauce.</p> <p>In third place and receiving $10,000 in seed money was Momentics, led by physics major&nbsp;<strong>Alana Aamodt</strong>&nbsp;<strong>&rsquo;18,</strong>&nbsp;physics and studio art major<strong>&nbsp;Anna Gilbertson &rsquo;19</strong>, and Josie Eichers, a finance and international business student at the University of Minnesota. Aamodt, who was fascinated by Rube Goldberg-like machines as a child, well before she took her first physics class as a senior in high school, wishes there had been something like Momentics when she was growing up. Momentics is an open-ended toy kit for children ages 8-12 that leverages the viral culture of Rube Goldberg machines to engage and excite them about STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) by upcycling old toys to create chain reaction machines. A Momentics kit includes not just the connecting pieces for Rube Goldberg machines but also printed programming materials and access to online video community challenges.</p> <p>&ldquo;The goal of the company is to build a world where fun doesn&rsquo;t necessarily mean more, where people aren&rsquo;t afraid to try and fail, and where physics can be accessible and appealing to everyone,&rdquo; says Aamodt.</p> <p>Two other teams also made it to the finals. LifExpectancy, an iPhone application that motivates people to live healthier lives by showing them how each health and wellness activity they partake in affects one common area &mdash; their life expectancy, and therefore future &mdash; featured&nbsp;<strong>Lauren Weiss &rsquo;21,</strong>&nbsp;an economics and computer science major,&nbsp;and&nbsp;<strong>Jack Hamren &rsquo;18,&nbsp;</strong>an economics major. NOWZ, a universal event aggregation app that utilizes augmented reality to display and filter local events, featured astrophysics major&nbsp;<strong>Deming Haines &rsquo;21,&nbsp;</strong>mathematics major&nbsp;<strong>Charlie Kellogg &rsquo;21</strong>, and&nbsp;computer science major<strong>&nbsp;Case Regan &rsquo;21</strong>.</p> Film Program Partners with Rocky Mountain PBS Tue, 13 Feb 2018 15:30:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/film-program-partners-with-rocky-mountain-pbs http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/film-program-partners-with-rocky-mountain-pbs ]]> <p>Colorado College&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/academics/dept/filmandnewmedia/">Film and Media Studies</a>&nbsp;program is partnering with Rocky Mountain PBS to create &ldquo;In Short,&rdquo; a student-centered, student-curated series that showcases student-produced films.</p> <p>RMPBS originally created &ldquo;In Short&rdquo; to showcase films made in the <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/academics/dept/filmandnewmedia/colorado-documentary-project.html">Colorado Documentary Project</a>, a Colorado College summer course taught by assistant professors of Film and Media Studies Dylan Nelson and Clay Haskell. The show&rsquo;s first season, last year, showcased five episodes of exclusively CC student documentary work.&nbsp;Film and Media Studies recently received a $2,500 grant from the Colorado Office of Film, Television, and Media Education to help support the program.</p> <p>The long-term vision for the show&nbsp;is to highlight student films from across the state &mdash; and that&rsquo;s where Colorado College students come&nbsp;in. Working under the supervision of Nelson, Haskell, and Film and Media paraprofessional <strong>Sophie Capp &rsquo;17</strong>, a&nbsp;team of CC student programmers&nbsp;will solicit works, select the strongest films, engage with filmmakers to make&nbsp;necessary&nbsp;changes, and finally, create thematic programs and deliver the shows &mdash; including technical, legal, and promotional materials &mdash; to the network. The students will receive professional&nbsp;producing credit for the season&rsquo;s shows.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s an opportunity to work professionally with your peers,&rdquo; says Capp. &ldquo;You can really learn what goes into putting a television show together.&rdquo; The program was mentioned in a recent story in <em>Seventeen</em> titled <a href="http://www.seventeen.com/life/school/a12446944/the-best-colleges-for-every-major/">"The Best Colleges for Every Major."</a></p> <p>As supervising producer of the show, Capp has worked closely with the student team and with RMPBS executives, notably producer Kate Perdoni. The student programming team for season 2 includes <strong>Meron Afutu &rsquo;18, Will Stockton &rsquo;18, Lily Green &rsquo;18, Kai Cintorino &rsquo;18, Mary Sorich &rsquo;18, </strong>and <strong>Ella Grossman &rsquo;19</strong>.</p> <p>The creation of the second season of &ldquo;In Short&rdquo; currently is underway, with 10 episodes in progress. Season 2, which will air region-wide beginning in May, will draw on the library of recently produced Colorado College student films, from fiction to experimental to documentary, as the student programmers develop a set of evaluative criteria and protocols, helping to define and identify &ldquo;quality&rdquo; when selecting films for the second season of the show, as well as ensuring a diversity of themes and filmic forms. Nelson says Season 2 will provide the team with the experience necessary to expand the program in future seasons. Beginning with Season 3 (2018-19), the team will solicit works from film students statewide.</p> <p>The opportunities for Colorado College students are numerous. In addition to receiving producing credit, they learn to deliver films that meet PBS&rsquo;s technical specifications, develop professional relationships with other filmmakers, learn to impose and enforce deadlines, negotiate contracts, and navigate the tricky territory of recommending cuts or edits to a film &ndash; and how to proceed if the filmmaker objects. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been able to learn more the collaborative work that goes into preparing a show for broadcast,&rdquo; says <strong>Lily Green &rsquo;19</strong>. As an aspiring filmmaker, this experience has helped me understand what it takes to make and distribute projects for wider audiences.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;It gives students a different viewpoint when looking at films&mdash;including their own,&rdquo; Nelson says. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m thrilled with the opportunity for our students to contribute to and grow our state&rsquo;s film culture.&rdquo;</p> CC's Izzy Atkin ’21 Wins Bronze at the Olympics Fri, 09 Feb 2018 17:30:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-s-izzy-atkin-21-wins-bronze-at-the-olympics http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-s-izzy-atkin-21-wins-bronze-at-the-olympics ]]> <p>by <strong>Laurie Laker &rsquo;12</strong></p> <p>Colorado College's <strong>Isabel &ldquo;Izzy&rdquo; Atkin &rsquo;21</strong>, competing in freestyle skiing for Great Britain&rsquo;s Team GB at this year&rsquo;s 2018 Winter Olympic Games in PyeongChang, South Korea,&nbsp;<a href="http://gazette.com/article/1621218?utm_source=Newsletter&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=Colorado+College+freshman+becomes+Britain+s+first+Olympic+medal-winning+skier&amp;utm_campaign=Breaking+News+-+Colorado+College+freshman+becomes+Britain+s+first+Olympic+medal-winning+skier">took home the bronze medal</a> in women's ski slopestyle.</p> <p>Born in Boston to a Malaysian mother and British father, Atkin&rsquo;s path to Team GB and PyeongChang began at age three at Sugarloaf Mountain in Maine.</p> <p>&ldquo;When I was a kid, we&rsquo;d go to Sugarloaf every weekend,&rdquo; she explains via phone &ndash; the day before departing for PyeongChang. &ldquo;There was a youth ski group program there and once I&rsquo;d reached a certain level and age, about eight years old or so, I was moved into the advanced groups for both freestyle and racing.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;When the time came to choose between freestyle and racing for competitive skiing, I liked freestyle more &ndash; there&rsquo;s more variety there like mogul skiing, aerials, and slopestyle or half-pipe skiing, whereas racing is just going through gates as fast as you can.&rdquo;</p> <p>With dual citizenship, the choice of which nation to represent at an international level was one she&rsquo;d be confronted with early in her career,</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;d been competing on the national circuit in the U.S. for a while, at younger age events. The head coach of GB Park &amp; Pipe knew I had dual citizenship and he was really interested in bringing me into the team from an early age. My dad and I went over to England to visit, and he was very clear about wanting me on the team.&rdquo;</p> <p>Team GB, far smaller than the U.S. equivalent, &ldquo;feels like a real family,&rdquo; says Atkin. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been on the team since I was 15, so I&rsquo;m really close with my teammates. It&rsquo;s an individual sport, so we&rsquo;re all very competitive, but also supportive of each other.&rdquo;</p> <p>Atkin&rsquo;s rise through the ranks of world slopestyle has been the culmination of years of hard work, and her track record speaks for itself. She started competing on the World Cup and U.S. Grand Prix circuit at the age of 15, during the 2013-14 season. During the last four years, across 24 slopestyle competitions. she&rsquo;s placed inside the top 10 in all but one of the events. Over the last three years, her successes have continued to come thick and fast, including a silver medal in slopestyle at the X Games in Aspen, Colorado, this January, as well winning first-place at the Slopestyle World Cup in Silvaplana, Switzerland, when she became the first-ever British woman to win a ski slopestyle World Cup competition. At the 2017 World Championships in Sierra Nevada, Spain, Atkin took home the bronze medal in slopestyle.</p> <p>Competing at an elite level isn&rsquo;t easy by itself, but when you add in the academic and social commitments of a CC education, it&rsquo;s a near-miraculous balancing act for Atkin.</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m still testing out the balance of it all, but I&rsquo;m only a first-year student after all!&nbsp; I had to take Blocks 3 through 6 off for Olympic training and qualification, but I&rsquo;ve really loved my experience so far,&rdquo; says Atkin.</p> <p>&ldquo;With my schedule, the Block Plan has been really helpful in taking time off in a way that a semester program just wouldn&rsquo;t allow. Everyone&rsquo;s been really helpful, from administrative staff to my professors, as they know I&rsquo;m pursuing this at a high level.&rdquo;</p> <p>Although she hasn&rsquo;t declared a major yet, Atkin is leaning toward the &ldquo;idea of either math or physics, but I don&rsquo;t want to get too specific yet &ndash; mainly because the liberal arts on the Block Plan encourages me to experiment and explore as I go.&rdquo;</p> <p>Being an Olympian is &ldquo;a dream come true,&rdquo; says Atkin. &ldquo;I used to watch the summer and winter games every two years. It really hasn&rsquo;t settled in that I&rsquo;m going to be there &ndash; competing. I don&rsquo;t think it will until I get to Korea, honestly.&rdquo;</p> <p></p> Chica Chocolate Wins $25,000 in Big Idea Event Thu, 08 Feb 2018 20:30:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/chica-chocolate-wins-25-000-in-big-idea-event http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/chica-chocolate-wins-25-000-in-big-idea-event ]]> <p>Chica Chocolate, which took second place in Colorado College&rsquo;s Big Idea competition last year, returned to take first place and $25,000 in prize money at CC&rsquo;s sixth annual Big Idea competition, held Feb. 8 in the Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center. The student pitch competition, with a total of $50,000 prize money at stake, drew a packed house and is rapidly becoming one of CC&rsquo;s signature events.</p> <p>Chica Chocolate consists of team members <strong>Cassidy Lam &rsquo;19</strong> and Elise Morgan, a student at the University of Colorado&mdash;Boulder. The company&rsquo;s high-quality chocolate truffles are infused with a Chinese herbal formula designed to promote hormone balance, and are delivered to customers on a subscription basis.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s validating to have the support and realization that other people believe in what we&rsquo;re doing and think it&rsquo;s worthwhile,&rdquo; says Lam,&nbsp;an international political economy major and Chinese minor. &ldquo;We had more to lose this year; we&rsquo;ve already built something and believe so strongly in our idea and are so passionate about the mission of our work.&rdquo;</p> <p>She and Morgan, who have been friends since they met in seventh-grade gym class (as did Ben and Jerry, they note), were one of three female-led teams this year, a first for the program.</p> <p>Taking second place and netting $15,000 in seed money was Raw Sauce, led by environmental science major <strong>Alex Harros &rsquo;18</strong> and geology major&nbsp;<strong>George Fowlkes &rsquo;18.</strong> Raw Sauce is a sustainable fermented foods business with an end goal of internally sourcing produce through their own hydroponic grow operation. The company strives to create food that causes no unnecessary harm from seed to sauce. To help convince the judges of the probiotic product&rsquo;s merit, the team presented the judging panel, consisting of four Colorado College alumni and a retired entrepreneur, with chips and a sampling of the sauce. (The judges agreed that the hot sauce was appealing.)</p> <p>In third place and receiving $10,000 in seed money was Momentics, led by physics major <strong>Alana Aamodt</strong>&nbsp;<strong>&rsquo;18,</strong>&nbsp;physics and studio art major<strong> Anna Gilbertson &rsquo;19</strong>, and Josie Eichers, a finance and international business student at the University of Minnesota. Aamodt, who was fascinated by Rube Goldberg-like machines as a child, well before she took her first physics class as a senior in high school, wishes there had been something like Momentics when she was growing up. Momentics is an open-ended toy kit for children ages 8-12 that leverages the viral culture of Rube Goldberg machines to engage and excite them about STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) by upcycling old toys to create chain reaction machines. A Momentics kit includes not just the connecting pieces for Rube Goldberg machines but also printed programming materials and access to online video community challenges.</p> <p>&ldquo;The goal of the company is to build a world where fun doesn&rsquo;t necessarily mean more, where people aren&rsquo;t afraid to try and fail, and where physics can be accessible and appealing to everyone,&rdquo; says Aamodt.</p> <p>Two other teams also made it to the finals. LifExpectancy, an iPhone application that motivates people to live healthier lives by showing them how each health and wellness activity they partake in affects one common area &mdash; their life expectancy, and therefore future &mdash; featured <strong>Lauren Weiss &rsquo;21,</strong> an economics and computer science major,&nbsp;and&nbsp;<strong>Jack Hamren &rsquo;18,&nbsp;</strong>an economics major.</p> <p>NOWZ, a universal event aggregation app that utilizes augmented reality to display and filter local events, featured astrophysics major&nbsp;<strong>Deming Haines &rsquo;21, </strong>mathematics major <strong>Charlie Kellogg &rsquo;21</strong>, and&nbsp;computer science major<strong> Case Regan &rsquo;21</strong>.</p> <p>Colorado College President Jill Tiefenthaler noted that in addition to three teams being led by female students, this year&rsquo;s competition also featured two teams led by first-year students and had a wide representation of majors and disciplines.</p> <p>Judge <strong>Meriwether Hardie &rsquo;09</strong>, organizational development manager for Denver-based Bio-Logical Capital, a land investment, development, and conservation company, also commented on the diversity of the teams. &ldquo;This competition is having a wider and wider impact, and pulling in more CC students,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s harnessing innovation and putting a business model behind it.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Big Idea is &ldquo;a pipeline of student projects with a lot of momentum,&rdquo; said <strong>Kishen Mangat &rsquo;96,&nbsp;</strong>general manager of mobile core and policy for Cisco Systems and a CC trustee. &ldquo;The younger student groups are encouraging and very promising for the program.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hardie and Mangat, each in their second year as judges, joined six-time judge <strong>Bob Selig &rsquo;61,</strong>&nbsp;president of Hayward, California-based Davis Instruments and a CC trustee; <strong>Em Havens &rsquo;09, </strong>senior human systems designer at IDEO U, an education startup within design firm, IDEO; and Bart Holaday, a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate who has chaired the Center for Innovation Foundation at the University of North Dakota and is involved with the university's entrepreneurship program.&nbsp;</p> <p>Seventeen teams registered for the competition in December, says CC Director of Innovation<strong> Dez</strong> <strong>Stone Menendez &rsquo;02</strong>. Of those, nine advanced to the semifinals in January and five made it to the finals. Additionally, several of the teams in previous competitions are still in operation, including Spindle, Flyphone, Colorado Springs Food Rescue, and Ogugu.</p> Quad Partnership Launches Three New Projects Tue, 06 Feb 2018 15:45:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/quad-partnership-launches-three-new-projects http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/quad-partnership-launches-three-new-projects ]]> <p>The Quad Innovation Partnership launched two community-focused impact projects this week, with a third launching later this month. The three projects include working with two local companies, Janska and Altia, and a social services collaboration between the City of Colorado Springs and El Paso County.</p> <p>The Quad, a joint initiative between four institutions of higher education in Colorado Springs &mdash; Colorado College, Pikes Peak Community College, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, and the US Air Force Academy &mdash;&nbsp;is continuing its mission of serving the immediate needs of area businesses and organizations while offering professional development opportunities to students and recent graduates. Two members of the Colorado College Department of Economics and Business are servings as team advisers.</p> <p>To oversee the rapidly expanding project base &mdash; and number of students engaged in project work &mdash; the Quad has hired <strong>Beka Adair &rsquo;16</strong> as assistant director. Adair, who earned a BA in economics from Colorado College, joined the Quad from the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce and Economic Development Corporation where she specialized in economic development, workforce development, and talent retention.</p> <p>&ldquo;The Quad Innovation Partnership brings together business, community, higher education and ideas, creating exciting opportunities for students and young grads,&rdquo; says Colorado College President Jill Tiefenthaler. &ldquo;The Quad is making a tremendous positive impact in the region. Hands-on, real-world projects prepare students and grads for leadership.&rdquo;</p> <p>Each project has a dedicated team comprised of students and grads from each school, at least one dedicated Quad staff member, and a faculty advisor with relevant subject-matter expertise. Teams work closely with business and government executives to build valuable solutions to the specific issues these organizations have asked the Quad to address.</p> <p>This spring, the Quad will oversee the following projects:</p> <ul> <li>Janska, a clothing manufacturer in Southeast Colorado Springs, is working with the Quad to develop a complete product identity and marketing framework for its &ldquo;Clothing that Comforts&rdquo; product line. The Quad team will conduct focus groups, interviews, and other market research to ultimately deliver refined messaging and a concrete go-to-market strategy to the company to boost sales.</li> <li>Altia, a growing graphical user interface company headquartered in Colorado Springs, is working with the Quad to finalize a sales and demonstration package for a new data product it is developing. The Quad team will allow the company to bring the product to market up to six months sooner than originally planned. This team is being advised by CC Professor of Economics and Business Dan Johnson.</li> <li>The City of Colorado Springs and El Paso County have partnered to work with a Quad team to improve access to social services in the greater metro area. The Quad team will examine several transportation-based strategies for improving access and will prioritize interventions on the basis of enhanced service delivery and cost efficiency. This team is being advised by CC Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Kat Miller-Stevens.</li> </ul> <p>&ldquo;The purpose and structure of these teams is to guide our students to solutions that provide immediate value to our partners and for the students to gain valuable, market-ready experience,&rdquo; says Jacob Eichengreen, executive director of the Quad Partnership. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re not going to deliver &lsquo;if we had a million dollars&rsquo; ideas to our partners. We&rsquo;re going to deliver solutions that work.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;My role is to coach all students engaged in Quad projects, and to ensure the results we deliver meet the needs of the community and our partners,&rdquo; Adair says. &ldquo;I believe that the most effective way to move our city forward is by bringing our students and young graduates from our area institutions together to create and implement new, innovative solutions to the issues our community is facing, big and small.&rdquo;</p> Ancient Greek Philosophy at Baca Sun, 04 Feb 2018 13:54:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/ancient-greek-philosophy-at-baca http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/ancient-greek-philosophy-at-baca <p>Fifteen Philosophy and Classics students wrapped up a week at the Baca campus on Friday, February 1st, reading, discussing, and writing papers on the social and political philosophy of Plato and Aristotle.&nbsp; Along the way, most the class climbed the Great Sand Dunes, soaked at Joyful Journey Hot Springs, and otherwise got out of the Cave!</p> Journalist Joins 91.5 KRCC for Collaborative Project Fri, 02 Feb 2018 11:30:00 MST http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/journalist-joins-91-5-krcc-for-collaborative-project http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/journalist-joins-91-5-krcc-for-collaborative-project ]]> <p>Award-winning reporter Ali Budner is joining 91.5 KRCC, Colorado College&rsquo;s NPR-member station, as part of a journalism collaborative focusing on the Mountain West.&nbsp;</p> <p>Budner, who will start Feb. 12, comes to 91.5 KRCC from the San Francisco Bay Area. Her reporting there focused on a variety of topics ranging from health and the environment to homelessness and immigration.</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m thrilled to be joining the reporting team at 91.5 KRCC and to be a part of the new <a href="http://krcc.org/post/915-krcc-launches-new-journalism-collaborative-focusing-mountain-west">CPB-funded regional journalism collaborative</a>,&rdquo; says Budner, a Texas native.&nbsp; &ldquo;I&rsquo;m most excited to dig in and find out how people in Southern Colorado are navigating the changing political and ecological landscapes around them. And I&rsquo;m curious to explore all the ways these stories connect to the broader experience of people throughout the Mountain West and the country as a whole.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Budner also will train to be a substitute local host for the NPR flagship programming that is aired on 91.5 KRCC.<br /><br />Budner&rsquo;s resume includes work with The Kitchen Sisters, KPFA radio in Berkeley, California, and KALW radio in San Francisco.&nbsp;She was a managing producer for five years for KALW's daily live public affairs call-in show, &ldquo;Your Call,&rdquo; with Rose Aguilar, which was named by <em>The Nation</em> magazine as &ldquo;the most valuable local radio show in the country.&rdquo;<br /><br />While at KALW, Budner also reported and co-produced an hour-long documentary, &ldquo;The Race to an Emergency,&rdquo; about the 911 emergency response system in Oakland, California.&nbsp; It received several national awards, including the Edward R. Murrow award for best radio news documentary in a large market.</p> <p>Since then, Budner&rsquo;s reporting has appeared on PRI&rsquo;s &ldquo;<em>The World,&rdquo;</em> NPR&rsquo;s &ldquo;<em>Latino USA,&rdquo;</em> and WHYY's &ldquo;<em>The Pulse,&rdquo; </em>among other prominent outlets.&nbsp; She also traveled to Fukushima, Japan, to report on the long-term aftermath of the tsunami and radiation disasters.</p> <p>The journalism collaborative unites six stations in five Mountain West states &mdash; Colorado, Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Montana &mdash; to better serve the people of the region.&nbsp; Budner will contribute stories focusing on land and water issues, growth, and Western culture and heritage.</p>