Colorado College News http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cc-rss-news.html Dr. Heidi R. Lewis Receives AALAC Grant Fri, 21 Sep 2018 07:47:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/dr-heidi-r-lewis-receives-aalac-grant http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/dr-heidi-r-lewis-receives-aalac-grant <p>Dr. Heidi R. Lewis (Director and Associate Professor of Feminist &amp; Gender Studies), in collaboration with&nbsp;Dr. <a href="https://wgss.williams.edu/profile/07kmg/" target="_blank">Kai M. Green</a> (Williams College) and Dr. <a href="https://english.williams.edu/profile/ksl3/" target="_blank">Kimberly Love</a> (Williams College), was recently awarded a grant from the <a href="http://www.aalac.org/" target="_blank">Alliance to Advance Liberal Arts Colleges</a>&nbsp;(AALAC) to organize and host a faculty workshop entitled "<a href="http://www.aalac.org/2018-funded-workshops/" target="_blank">From the Archive of Our Black Lives: How to Write and Tell Black (Hi)stories Across Genre and Form</a>."</p> <p>This workshop will allow participants to discuss current oral history and ethnographic projects and to collaborate with artists as they think through innovative ways of sharing narratives. Each day will feature three sessions designed to examine Oral History, Dynamic Performance and Mixed Media Storytelling, followed by sessions during which participants will work on their projects.</p> <p>The AALAC,&nbsp;which includes <a href="http://www.aalac.org/" target="_blank">Colorado College</a>, "strives to advance liberal arts education through collective efforts to support faculty research and teaching so as to enhance the overall experience of students and to develop faculty leadership. By working together, AALAC members seek to develop a broader view of their institutions in the landscape of higher education and thereby to address more effectively the pressing challenges facing American liberal arts colleges. Through assessment of AALAC activities and dissemination of our findings, the organization seeks to share best practices with other liberal arts colleges and to make the case to the larger public for the value of liberal education in the twenty-first century."</p> Provost Townsend Featured at Tribeca Festival in ‘Let Science Speak’ Fri, 21 Sep 2018 00:00:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/provost-townsend-featured-at-tribeca-festival-in-let-science-speak http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/provost-townsend-featured-at-tribeca-festival-in-let-science-speak <p><span><a href="https://letsciencespeak.com/">&ldquo;Let Science Speak,&rdquo;</a></span> a six-part digital short documentary series about the importance of science&nbsp;in our ever-evolving world, premiered Thursday, Sept. 20 at the<strong> Tribeca&nbsp;Film Festival in New York</strong> and featured a segment with Colorado College <span><a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/offices/provost/">Provost Alan Townsend</a></span>.&nbsp; Townsend also participated in an opening night panel discussion that included environmental journalist Andy Revkin, Rep. Bill Foster (D. Ill.), the only Ph.D. physicist in Congress, and Johnathan Foley of the California Academy of Sciences.</p> <p>The goal of the film series and campaign is to call America&rsquo;s attention to the importance of science in one&rsquo;s daily life, as well as to the damaging effects of censorship, and to help rally public support for scientists and the vital work they do every day.</p> <p>&shy;The documentary project, slated for a prime spot at the festival, tells the personal stories of six environmental scientists who are not only well known in their fields, but also have additional ways to make science personal. The goal of the project is to try to help shift the narrative about science and scientists, as part of broader campaigns to restore public trust therein.</p> <p>&ldquo;Chipping away at America&rsquo;s solid scientific foundation means we risk losing much of what we hold dear. &lsquo;Let Science Speak&rsquo;&nbsp;is a window into the fundamental humanity of science &mdash; and why we all should care about its future,&rdquo; says Townsend.</p> <p>Townsend, who joined CC in June as provost and professor of environmental science, says he participated in the project to help &ldquo;do what we can to chart a more sustainable relationship between human progress and the environments on which we all depend.&rdquo;</p> <p>His childhood in Hawaii and Montana led him to a career devoted to understanding our changing planet, and what we can do to chart a more sustainable relationship between human progress and the environments on which we all depend. &nbsp;He is a highly cited author of more than 130 peer reviewed articles, and a strong advocate for academic engagement beyond the ivory tower. <span><a href="https://letsciencespeak.com/">Watch the trailer and find full episodes</a></span>.</p> Jessy Randall Publishes Book of Visual Poetry Thu, 20 Sep 2018 15:00:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/jessy-randall-publishes-book-of-visual-poetry http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/jessy-randall-publishes-book-of-visual-poetry ]]> <p>If you&rsquo;re not sure you&rsquo;re human, Jessy Randall, curator and archivist in Special Collections at CC&rsquo;s Tutt Library, might be able to help. But don&rsquo;t expect a physiology book; instead, Randall&rsquo;s new book of visual poetry, &ldquo;How to Tell if You Are Human,&rdquo; might have the answer.</p> <p>Although Randall has written numerous books of poetry, this is her first collection of visual, or diagram, poems. &ldquo;Visual poems are their own weird sub-set of poetry,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;For me, the diagrams are like a poetic form.</p> <p>&ldquo;The diagrams I used for the scaffold usually provided, by their shape and sometimes by their original meaning, some kind of spark for the words I added,&rdquo; she says. For example, a sketch of a school building and adjoining playground prompted this poem: &ldquo;All day long we looked out the windows/and then at recess/we looked at each other.&rdquo; A graphic of the earth&rsquo;s sediment accumulating over time inspired this: &ldquo;Slowly, inexorably, over many years of conversations and travels, they revealed their true natures. By the time they knew all each other&rsquo;s flaws, it was too late for them to stop being friends.&rdquo;</p> <p>Randall, who has a degree in English from Columbia University and a master&rsquo;s in library science from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (where she held a graduate assistantship in the Rare Book Collection and her thesis was a collection analysis of books by three modern poets) combines her library science background with her poetry. The two blend seamlessly throughout the book; take, for instance, an example of a poem/illustration that has its roots in &ldquo;From Nebula to Nebula,&rdquo; a 1917 text that features a circle with intersecting lines. The diagram inspired Randall to write: &ldquo;I am trying so hard not to turn into my mother/but my mother also tried very hard not to turn into her mother, so it&rsquo;s probably hopeless/I&rsquo;m going to keep trying though.&rdquo; Says Randall, &ldquo;The circle with intersecting lines seemed to me to fit perfectly with the problem of children turning into parents, despite all our best intentions, over and over again, generation by generation.&rdquo;</p> <p>All the diagrams in &ldquo;How to Tell if You Are Human&rdquo; are taken from illustrations in library books, says Randall, who joined Colorado College as curator of Special Collections in 2001. They possibly might all even come from books in the <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/library/">Tutt Library</a> collections, although Randall says, &ldquo;I&rsquo;m not 100 percent sure about that &mdash; the project took many years, so I don&rsquo;t remember exactly how I came across all the books.&rdquo; The sources for the illustrations, most of which were published before 1923, are provided in the book&rsquo;s table of contents.</p> <p>In addition to &ldquo;How to Tell if You Are Human,&rdquo; due out from Pleiades Press on Oct. 1, other poetry collections by Randall include &ldquo;Suicide Hotline Hold Music,&rdquo; &ldquo;Injecting Dreams into Cows, and &ldquo;A Day in Boyland,&rdquo; which was a finalist for the Colorado Book Award. Her poems, comics, and other writings have appeared in <em>Poetry, McSweeney&rsquo;s</em>, and <em>Best American Experimental Writing.</em> Randall also co-teaches a class in <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/academics/curriculum/course/topics-in-history-the-history-future-of-the-book-201620">The History and Future of the Book</a>.</p> Lifting the Lid – A Story of Luck, Research, and a Lifelong Passion Wed, 19 Sep 2018 14:29:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/lifting-the-lid-a-story-of-luck-research-and-a-lifelong-passion http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/lifting-the-lid-a-story-of-luck-research-and-a-lifelong-passion ]]> <h2>Lifting the Lid: Discovery and Investigation</h2> <p>In the fall of 2017, two U.S. Forest Service employees on a survey hike discovered two partially buried boxes at the foot of a cliff face in the San Luis Valley&rsquo;s Rio Grande National Forest. For the past several months, a current CC student, a CC professor, and a CC alumna have been working to slowly piece together a very human, local, and personal narrative about those boxes.</p> <p>The contents of the boxes date roughly from 1890-1918, and include everything from clothes to clipped recipes from magazines, stuffed into old tins. There are children&rsquo;s books, copies of <em>Good Housekeeping</em>, cutlery, and a tortoiseshell-patterned silicone comb. These are the things of a life, of a home and a family, completely without record or identifying features beyond several common names across the paperwork that was discovered with the items.</p> <p>&ldquo;Once the boxes had been recovered, we immediately thought of Ella and Scott,&rdquo; says <strong>Angie Krall &rsquo;92</strong>, an anthropology major at CC and now the heritage program manager and tribal liaison for the Rio Grande National Forest.</p> <p>&ldquo;Scott, Ella, and I had worked together during Block 2 the previous school year, so they were the first people we thought to get in touch with to do the research,&rdquo; adds Krall.</p> <p>The Block 2 class headed by Anthropology Professor Scott Ingram was Field Archaeology, which worked with the Forest Service to survey a previously unexamined portion of the Rio Grande National Forest along the congressionally designated Old Spanish National Historic Trail.</p> <h2>Leaving the Unknown Alone: An Archeologist<strong>&rsquo;</strong>s Obligation</h2> <p>That relationship, cultivated through experiential learning and fieldwork, brought <strong>Ella Axelrod &rsquo;19 </strong>and Ingram back to the San Luis Valley, to help research and discover more about the boxes, and the life and times of those who buried them.</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve always been really interested in history, people, what we&rsquo;ve done in the past and how it affects us now,&rdquo; says Axelrod. *</p> <p>Krall explains, of the boxes and their unearthing, &ldquo;Our policy is to leave something that&rsquo;s found where it is. We don&rsquo;t collect artifacts, we document them and leave them be. Sadly, this find was at the base of two climbing routes, and it looked like it&rsquo;d already been disturbed and could incur further damage if left in the ground. Once we excavated the boxes, we immediately contacted Ella and Scott at CC.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;As archeologists, we always have a preference to leave items and artifacts,&rdquo; Ingram concurs. &ldquo;We only recover them when there&rsquo;s a risk to the resource in question, but otherwise there&rsquo;s incredibly sensitive cultural and social complications to recovering anything without very good cause.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re not simply digging up and archiving items at CC,&rdquo; explains Ingram. &ldquo;For one thing, we don&rsquo;t have the space, but more broadly there&rsquo;s a huge misconception about archeology that it&rsquo;s dig-obsessed, digging for the sake of it, that it&rsquo;s possessive. That&rsquo;s not our zeitgeist here at CC, nor is it of Southwestern or North American archeology as a whole.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Nobody owns these,&rdquo; he adds. &ldquo;Ella is conducting their research in conjunction with the Rio Grande National Forest and the Rio Grande County Museum in the San Luis Valley to have them archive and display these pieces once the research is done. These belong to the people of that region, not to any one organization or person.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;The artifacts are the story here,&rdquo; says Ingram, &ldquo;and Ella&rsquo;s working now to find out more.&rdquo;</p> <p>Explains Axelrod, &ldquo;I was here for four or five weeks over the summer doing research, but I first got my hands on the boxes in December and January, and have been working away since then.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;With my class work during the Spring Semester, I was either in class, sleeping, or in the lab! This summer, I was able to dive more deeply into the contents of the boxes, documenting artifacts, consulting local and national history for concurrent events at the time, as well as looking into the names we have from the recovered papers, trying to tie these items to people and families still living in the area.&rdquo;</p> <p>The ultimate answer may be that we won&rsquo;t ever know who buried these items or why, whether they were hoping to recover them or not, or what led them to the remote site in the forest to begin with.</p> <p>&ldquo;As archeologists, we&rsquo;re very comfortable with ambiguity,&rdquo; explains Axelrod. &ldquo;The balance lies in finding out as much as you can, while knowing you won&rsquo;t ever know the exact point or purpose of something like this &mdash; you&rsquo;re building a case to support a well thought out theory, rather than to prove a specific hypothesis.&rdquo;</p> <h2>A Lifelong Passion Turned Professional Path</h2> <p>One thing that isn&rsquo;t ambiguous, however, is Axelrod&rsquo;s future.</p> <p>&ldquo;They know where they&rsquo;re going,&rdquo; says Ingram. &ldquo;This is Ella&rsquo;s career, without question.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;I knew I wanted to study anthropology from the outset at CC, but it was an 8<sup>th</sup> grade field trip that really first exposed me to what anthropology was, why it mattered, and sparked my interest,&rdquo; Axelrod says.</p> <p>Arriving at CC, they landed in the anthropology First-Year Experience class, Language and Culture: Native Peoples of the Southwest: Language, Art and Thought-Worlds with Professor Christina Leza. The class included a five-day field experience through Colorado and New Mexico, exploring the interconnectedness of language and culture among the Native peoples of the Southwest. They visited museums created and run solely by Native peoples, focusing on artistic expression and representation. This class, then, was <a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/ella-axelrod-19-uncovers-artifacts-and-passion-for-archaeology">Axelrod&rsquo;s launching pad for what would become their focus at CC and beyond</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve been really lucky here,&rdquo; they say, &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve managed to get into the field every single year as well as during the summers. I&rsquo;m not just sitting in a class, but doing the work, so that makes it all the more exciting.&rdquo;</p> <p>Axelrod managed to talk their way into Professor Ruth Van Dyke&rsquo;s archaeology class right after finishing their FYE, a 300-level class that took place in Castroville, Texas, north of San Antonio. The class sought to find signs of the early Alsacean settlements, built by Henri Castro and the French people he brought to the area in the mid 1840&rsquo;s &ndash; Axelrod&rsquo;s second field work class in their first two classes at CC.</p> <p>&ldquo;I was worried I wouldn&rsquo;t match up, but luckily I did,&rdquo; adds Axelrod.</p> <p>The summer after their first year, Axelrod took a class in their home state of Hawaii, at the University of Hawaii West Oahu, helping a team uncover a WWII prisoner of war and citizen internment camp. Additional fieldwork experiences in Buysscheure, France, on a forensic project with the University of Wisconsin-Madison followed their time in Hawaii, and the France project has been ongoing ever since. Axelrod returned in the summers of 2016, 2017, and 2018 to continue the vital, emotional work.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s an incredibly emotional experience, which is why forensic-focused anthropology appeals to me so much right now &mdash; this work feels like we&rsquo;re healing a wound that&rsquo;s been there for a generation or more,&rdquo; they explain.</p> <p>The work in France is sensitive, largely personal and private, involving the recovery and identification of U.S. military personnel from WWII, whose remains haven&rsquo;t yet been accounted for.</p> <p>&ldquo;We use everything from DNA to serial numbers on aircraft guns to help identify the people involved,&rdquo; Axelrod says. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s really hard work, but when you get moments like we had &ndash; being able to bring someone&rsquo;s son to the site to see where his father laid &ndash; it&rsquo;s so worth it.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve known this is what I&rsquo;ve wanted to do for a very long time,&rdquo; Axelrod says. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m looking at applying for Ph.D. programs this fall, and continuing the work.&rdquo;</p> <hr /> <p></p> <p>*&nbsp;<span>Axelrod uses the gender pronouns<span>&nbsp;</span></span><span>they</span><span>/them/theirs.</span></p> Cutler Hall Renovation Wed, 19 Sep 2018 00:00:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cutler-hall-renovation http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/cutler-hall-renovation ]]> <p><strong>The Charge: </strong>A sense of place is becoming ever more important to the current and next generation of students as they balance virtual mobility with a deeper, more enduring awareness rooted in community and the immediate physical environment. As part of CC&rsquo;s identity and responsibility as the only liberal arts college in the Rocky Mountain West, the college is committed to working toward becoming a model of environmental stewardship and innovation by advancing both the study and the practice of sustainability.</p> <p><strong>What&rsquo;s Happening</strong>: This fall CC&rsquo;s oldest building, Cutler Hall, reopened after a four-month renovation.&nbsp;The comprehensive project included updating the building&rsquo;s HVAC system&nbsp;with high-performance variable refrigerant flow technology, including individual room temperature controls, added new&nbsp;office technology&nbsp;and audio-visual systems,&nbsp;expanded the main floor lobby space,&nbsp;created a 40-person upstairs meeting room, added accessibility systems to meet the needs of added second-floor activities,&nbsp;and expanded the number of staff offices and visitor meeting spaces.</p> <p>The subtle facelift not only updated the utilities in the building; a new elevator, wider hallways, and other upgrades make Cutler Hall more accessible to those visiting the Office of Admission.</p> <p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a saying, &lsquo;you don&rsquo;t get a second chance to make a good first impression&rsquo; and now we are even more proud to showcase CC&rsquo;s original building, Cutler Hall, to the thousands of prospective students who visit campus each year,&rdquo; says Vice President for Admission Mark Hatch. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s more seating in the common areas, a beautiful presentation room, comfortable interview spaces to put students at ease, and state of the art technology that we hope will allow us to bring the college to prospective students near and far with videoconferencing.&rdquo;</p> <p>Cutler Hall was last renovated in 2004 for fire and safety updates as well as historic preservation work.</p> <p>To track improvements to its facilities, as well as other sustainability initiatives, CC participates in the national Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education Sustainable Campus Index, a self-reporting system to highlight colleges' and universities' sustainability efforts. CC made a number of appearances in the recently published 2018 STARS report. The newly renovated Tutt Library was highlighted in the &ldquo;Buildings&rdquo; section of the report, saying the library is a &ldquo;major contributor to the college&rsquo;s goal of carbon neutrality by 2020.&rdquo; CC&rsquo;s Director of Sustainability Ian Johnson highlights the significance of the report, saying &ldquo;it is important to be in the know about what other schools are doing and to make sure that we remain leaders in our work.&rdquo;&nbsp;<a href="http://sites.coloradocollege.edu/atb/2018/08/22/cc-makes-sustainability-gains-in-stars-report/">Learn more and read the full 2018 report</a>.</p> The State of Slim Wed, 19 Sep 2018 00:00:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/the-state-of-slim http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/the-state-of-slim ]]> <p><strong>The Charge:</strong> Because people are our greatest asset and our Rocky Mountain location is an essential part of our identity, we have a deep appreciation for holistic well-being.&nbsp; CC strives to one of the best places in the nation to learn and work. We value creativity and innovation, which require reflection and exploration. To make time to reflect, explore, and innovate, we recognize the role of a healthy community in individual wellness.&nbsp; Supporting staff and faculty wellness from a holistic perspective &mdash; as we do for students &mdash; could increase productivity and model healthy behaviors for students.</p> <p><strong>What&rsquo;s Happening:</strong> The college&rsquo;s second year in partnership with State of Slim was equally successful as year one.&nbsp; Twenty participants entered the 16-week journey in January 2018 and emerged on the other side with an average of more than 20 lbs. of weight lost and a wealth of healthy knowledge gained.&nbsp; &ldquo;The State of Slim program has helped me stay motivated with physical activity and adventure. Because of this program, I have summited my first 14er, climbed the Manitou Incline, and have sustained a gym membership/attendance for well over a year. These are things that I never pictured as results of the program and I am so grateful for the opportunity! I would absolutely tell others about the college&rsquo;s wellness efforts. We are lucky to work at a place that supports so many aspects of employee wellness, including the State of Slim program,&rdquo; says Sara Rotunno, assistant director of accessibility resources.&nbsp; Rotunno is not the only participant who has conquered the mountains of Colorado as a result of the program.&nbsp; Lynette DiRaddo, manager of the Worner Information Desk, who participated in the inaugural year of the program, is&nbsp;<a href=" https://www.stateofslim.com/climbing-mountains/">featured on the State of Slim website</a> telling her amazing success story. State of Slim is not just for staff, Professor of Music Ofer Ben-Amots participated in year one and has this to say about the program: &ldquo;The State of Slim Program had a great and wonderful impact on me: after losing over 35 pounds I felt so much better and healthier. More importantly, however, it encouraged me to make an effective change in my lifestyle and eating habits. I am very thankful to Colorado College for providing this amazing wellness program and encourage any of my colleagues in the faculty and staff to try it out!&rdquo;</p> <p>The State of Slim program is only one of many new wellness programs the college offers.&nbsp; A &ldquo;Wellness State of Mind&rdquo; track was added to the Excel@CC professional development program in 2016. Classes in the track vary from <em>Meditative Wheel Throwing</em> (offered through the Fine Arts Center), <em>Art Journaling</em>, to <em>Money at Work</em>, and <em>Personal Financial Planning</em> just to name a few.&nbsp; Just this past August 3, a group of faculty and staff went to the CC Cabin to learn self-care practices at a day-long retreat.</p> <p>The new wellness programs initiated as part of the college&rsquo;s strategic plan workplace excellence recommendation is in addition to the already wide spectrum of benefits and opportunities available at the college.&nbsp; The college offers a comprehensive benefits program, free onsite gym access, free access to the FAC museum, free-onsite annual biometric screenings, a smoke- and tobacco-free campus, and a free employee assistance program that provides services on substance abuse, counseling, and legal advice, just to name a few. For a complete list of all the college&rsquo;s benefits and to view the complete lineup for the Wellness State of Mind, visit <span><a href="https://mybensite.com/coloradocollege/">https://mybensite.com/coloradocollege/</a></span>. The college&rsquo;s chapel offers several weekly programs also geared toward wellness.&nbsp; Those include &ndash; Meditative Mondays, Oigong Tuesdays and Zen Buddhist meetings and meditation.</p> Dynamic Half Block Update Wed, 19 Sep 2018 00:00:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/dynamic-half-block-update http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/dynamic-half-block-update ]]> <p><strong>The Charge:</strong> To better educate our students about their options after college, help them to reflect on and articulate the relevance of their CC experience, and build the practical skills that ease transition to today&rsquo;s workplace, we will create a dynamic Half-Block program. New offerings during the nine-day Half Block in early January will concentrate on what students need to do to prepare for the future in both their academic and professional careers.</p> <p><strong>What&rsquo;s Happening:</strong> In January 2014, the college launched the Dynamic Half Block which introduced non-credit courses aimed at better preparing students with the academic, professional, and practical skills needed to transition to life after college. These new courses were in addition to the credit-bearing courses that have been offered since 1992.&nbsp; Having now completed five years of the expanded Half-Block program, the college undertook a research project over the summer to examine the complete profiles of the students taking advantage of the new offerings and how the profiles have evolved over time. Participation in Half Block has increased over time with the addition of the non-credit offerings.&nbsp; Around 20 percent of the student body took advantage of Half Block when only for-credit courses were being offered.&nbsp; With the addition of the non-credit offerings, the percentage of the student body participating in Half Block has jumped up to over 32 percent.&nbsp; When the class of 2018 was examined for participation over their time, 68 percent of the class had taken at least one course during Half Block, and more than half of those had taken two or more courses in their four years at CC. See this class&rsquo;s Half-Block participation by year in the chart above.</p> <p>Examining the demographic characteristics of the students who have taken Half Block, the data suggest that participation in for-credit courses has increased over time for students of color but decreased for international students. International students seem to be taking more non-credit courses than for-credit courses. However, when demographic variables were entered as predictors of a student taking Half Block, race/ethnicity was not significant. Financial aid status was a significant predictor, with students receiving financial aid exhibiting a greater likelihood of taking Half Block than those not on financial aid.&nbsp;&nbsp; Moreover, first-generation students were on average more likely than non-first-generation students to take a non-credit Half Block. Interested in reading the entire report? Contact <span><a href="mailto:lwilliams@coloradocollege.edu">Lyrae Williams</a></span></p> <p>Since the introduction of the non-credit courses, a variety of classes have been offered.&nbsp; In the last three years, five courses have remained constant and are some of the most popular &mdash; Mental Health First Aid, GRE, LSAT, and MCAT prep, as well as The Vocab: Critical Approaches to Spoken Word, Writing, and Performances. Each year, the Career Center plans the non-credit offerings with an eye on the future needs of our students when they transition to life after CC and ways in which the college can help prepare students for that dynamic future.&nbsp; Some of the topics coming in 2019 include &mdash; Advertising/PR, Public Speaking, Creative Entrepreneurship, Computer Language as a Language, and excelling at EXCEL, just to name a few.</p> Professor Jessica Kisunzu Publishes Two Articles Tue, 11 Sep 2018 11:15:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/professor-jessica-kisunzu-publishes-two-articles http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/professor-jessica-kisunzu-publishes-two-articles <p><a href="https://www.coloradocollege.edu/academics/dept/chemistry/people/profile.html?person=kisunzu_jessica_kristine">Assistant Professor of Chemistry Jessica Kisunzu</a>&nbsp;recently published two articles, &ldquo;A Benzyne Insertion Approach to Hetisine-Type Diterpenoid Alkaloids: Synthesis of Cossonidine (Davisine)&rdquo; and &ldquo;Conformational Analysis of a Peptidic Catalyst,&rdquo; in the <a href="https://pubs.acs.org/journal/jacsat"><em>Journal of the American Chemical Society</em></a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;My research at Colorado College incorporates my interests in benzyne chemistry as well as the computational analysis of molecular structure and properties,&rdquo; says Kisunzu, who joined CC&rsquo;s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in the fall of 2017. &ldquo;Students in my lab have the opportunity to make and study benzynes and related compounds, with the goal of developing new methods and applications.&rdquo;</p> <p>The research in the first article, &ldquo;<a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jacs.8b05043">A Benzyne Insertion Approach to Hetisine-Type Diterpenoid Alkaloids: Synthesis of Cossonidine (Davisine</a>)&rdquo; began when Kisunzu was in graduate school at the University of California, Berkeley, and working with the Sarpong group there. Plants in the monkshood and larkspur family (<em>Aconitum, Delphinium, </em>and <em>Consolida</em> genera) contain numerous chemical compounds called diterpenoid alkaloids, a term that refers to the structural properties of these compounds as well as the basic starting materials that nature uses to make them. Kisunzu notes that &ldquo;many diterpenoid alkaloids have biological activity, and some have been studied in relation to relieving pain, inflammation, or arrhythmia. In addition to a broad range of activity, diterpenoid alkaloids also have very complex structures.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Sarpong group at the University of California, Berkeley was interested in the synthesis and study of this family of molecules, she says. &ldquo;The focus of the reported research was to implement a new method to synthesize cossonidine (also named davisine), a representative diterpenoid alkaloid,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;Synthesis of cossonidine helps us gain insight into the molecule&rsquo;s structure and the effect that structural and chemical changes have on biological activity. By completing the total synthesis of cossonidine, we were able to use a new strategy &mdash; introducing key atoms via a strained intermediate called a benzyne &mdash; while also producing a compound that is difficult to isolate so that it, and analogs, can be studied.&rdquo;</p> <p>Kisunzu&rsquo;s second article, &ldquo;<a href="https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jacs.8b05459">Conformational Properties of a Peptidic Catalyst: Insights from NMR Spectroscopic Studies</a>,&rdquo; focuses on the research she conducted with the Wennemers research group at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich).</p> <p>Kisunzu notes that enzymes are nature&rsquo;s catalysts, making it possible for numerous biochemical reactions to occur rapidly. They consist of long chains of amino acid building blocks, often hundreds of them, which contribute to the overall structure and activity of the enzyme. When a much smaller number of amino acids are connected, the resulting molecules are classified as peptides.<br /><br />&ldquo;Peptides have many functions, but can also act as catalysts. Visualizing the structural orientation of peptide catalysts can help us understand their reactivity and selectivity,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;The Wennemers research group developed a highly effective catalyst from three amino acids. The focus of the reported research was to use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, a method that gives us connectivity and distance data, along with computational chemistry methods to model the structure of this catalyst. The resulting picture can help us discern which interactions and properties are important for reactivity.&rdquo;</p> Library Connection: Julia Dixon Evans, Visiting Writers Series Mon, 10 Sep 2018 15:00:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/library-connection-julia-dixon-evans-visiting-writers-series http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/library-connection-julia-dixon-evans-visiting-writers-series <p><strong>Julia Dixon Evans</strong> starts off the fall lineup for the Visiting Writers Series on <strong>Tuesday, September 11<sup>th</sup> </strong>at<strong> 7 p.m</strong>., <strong>McHugh Commons</strong>, 1090 N. Cascade Ave.</p> <p>Julia Dixon Evans is an author of many short stories and the novel &ldquo;How to Set Yourself on Fire.&rdquo; (Tutt Library - First Floor - New Arrivals, <a href="https://tiger.coloradocollege.edu/search~S5?/cPS3605.V3657+H69+2018/cps+3605+v3657+h69+2018/-3,-1,,B/browse">PS3605.V3657 H69 2018</a>) &nbsp;</p> <p>Her work can be found or is forthcoming in&nbsp;<em>McSweeney's, Paper Darts, New York Tyrant / Tyrant Books, Barrelhouse, San Diego CityBeat</em>, and elsewhere.</p> <p>She is the founding editor and host of&nbsp;<em>Last Exit</em>, a new literary journal, reading, and workshop series. She also serves as senior columns editor for <em><a href="https://medium.com/the-coil">The Coil</a>, </em>and is nonfiction editor for <a href=" http://noblegas.org/">Noble Gas Qrtrly</a>. &nbsp;She was a 2014 PEN in the Community resident, a program of <a href="https://pen.org">PEN America</a>, that brings professional writers into underserved schools and communities, and taught creative writing to <a href="http://www.tdarts.org/">ARTS&rsquo; TranscenDANCE</a>, youth dancers. She also is the former program director and editor for <a href="https://www.sosayweallonline.com/about">So Say We All</a>,a literary nonprofit.</p> <p>See her website with links to her work and writing at <a href="https://juliadixonevans.com/">https://juliadixonevans.com/</a>.</p> <p><em>&ldquo;It is essential that we create a space on campus to interact with contemporary writers,&rdquo; says Natanya Ann Pulley, a CC Assistant Professor of English and fiction writer.</em></p> Library Connection: Julia Dixon Evans, Visiting Writers Series Mon, 10 Sep 2018 15:00:00 MDT http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/library-connection-julia-dixon-evans-visiting-writers-series http://www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/newsroom/library-connection-julia-dixon-evans-visiting-writers-series <p><strong>Julia Dixon Evans</strong> starts off the fall lineup for the Visiting Writers Series on <strong>Tuesday, September 11<sup>th</sup> </strong>at<strong> 7 p.m</strong>., <strong>McHugh Commons</strong>, 1090 N. Cascade Ave.</p> <p>Julia Dixon Evans is an author of many short stories and the novel &ldquo;How to Set Yourself on Fire.&rdquo; (Tutt Library - First Floor - New Arrivals, <a href="https://tiger.coloradocollege.edu/search~S5?/cPS3605.V3657+H69+2018/cps+3605+v3657+h69+2018/-3,-1,,B/browse">PS3605.V3657 H69 2018</a>) &nbsp;</p> <p>Her work can be found or is forthcoming in&nbsp;<em>McSweeney's, Paper Darts, New York Tyrant / Tyrant Books, Barrelhouse, San Diego CityBeat</em>, and elsewhere.</p> <p>She is the founding editor and host of&nbsp;<em>Last Exit</em>, a new literary journal, reading, and workshop series. She also serves as senior columns editor for <em><a href="https://medium.com/the-coil">The Coil</a>, </em>and is nonfiction editor for <a href=" http://noblegas.org/">Noble Gas Qrtrly</a>. &nbsp;She was a 2014 PEN in the Community resident, a program of <a href="https://pen.org">PEN America</a>, that brings professional writers into underserved schools and communities, and taught creative writing to <a href="http://www.tdarts.org/">ARTS&rsquo; TranscenDANCE</a>, youth dancers. She also is the former program director and editor for <a href="https://www.sosayweallonline.com/about">So Say We All</a>,a literary nonprofit.</p> <p>See her website with links to her work and writing at <a href="https://juliadixonevans.com/">https://juliadixonevans.com/</a>.</p> <p><em>&ldquo;It is essential that we create a space on campus to interact with contemporary writers,&rdquo; says Natanya Ann Pulley, a CC Assistant Professor of English and fiction writer.</em></p>