PPRUMC 2022 - February 26th, 2022

19th Annual Pikes Peak Regional Undergraduate Mathematics Conference (PPRUMC)

Saturday, February 26th, 2022
Hosted virtually* by Colorado College

The focus of this annual conference is to give undergraduate mathematics students an opportunity to present their research and expository projects in a professional setting. Students throughout the Pikes Peak region and beyond are strongly encouraged to present in the areas of mathematics, mathematics education and the history of mathematics. Presentation topics could include the results of classroom or independent study, as he focus of this annual conference is to give undergraduate mathematics students an opportunity to present their research and expository projects in a professional setting. Students throughout the Pikes Peak region and beyond are strongly encouraged to present in the areas of mathematics, mathematics education and the history of mathematics. Presentation topics could include the results of classroom or independent study, as well as REU or other research projects. Both research and expository topics are welcome. Students who do not present are also encouraged to attend, and learn more about the mathematics profession, including graduate school and career opportunities.

*:Zoom details will be sent to registered participants the morning of the event.

 


Schedule (all times in MST)  
Student talks are 15 minutes each - (Student Talk schedule below)
9:00-9:15 Welcome Remarks
9:15-10:15 Keynote Speaker: Dr. Casey Fiesler
10:30-12:00 Student presentations
12:00-1:00 Lunch break
1:00-2:20 Student presentations 
2:20-3:00 Networking / unstructured discussions in breakout Rooms
3:00-4:00 Panel on careers in mathematics


Student Talk Schedule

Track 1 - Discrete Mathematics (Dr. Ike Agbanusi)
 
10:30 AM Emelia McLaughlin and Julie Trimber USAFA The Problem of Frobenius for Fulcrum Numerical Semigroups
10:50 AM Tati Kong and Renata Russell USAFA A self-indulgent talk about narcissistic numbers
11:10 AM Adithya Bhaskara Silver Creek High School, Front Range Community College
Aiming to Prove a Special Case of Green's Theorem Using the Shoelace Lemma
11:30 AM Emerson Worrell Colorado College Analyses of Tapatan and Picaria
1:00 PM Philippos Dimitroglou and Alex Kreider USAFA The Games of Sylver Coinage and Destroy the Graph
1:20 PM Olivia Bouthot Colorado College Extension of McDougall's Circle Theorem
1:40 PM Jake Cooley USAFA A Behavioral Approach to Repeated Bayesian Security Games

 
Track 2 - Modelling and Machine Learning (Dr. Cory Scott)
10:30 AM Michael Johnson Indiana University Stick Index of n-component Brunnian Links
10:50 AM Faith White Student A numeric approach to the sport of bowling
11:10 AM Ryan Chen United States Air Force Academy
Reduced-Order Modeling in Plasma Dynamical Systems Using Sensitivity Analysis and Machine Learning Techniques
11:30 AM Cooper Doe Colorado College Modeling Gene Regulatory Motifs
1:00 PM Daniel Lewinsohn Colorado College/Oregon Health and Science University Computational methods for single-cell RNA sequencing analysis
1:20 PM Ethan Gharst USAFA Adversarial Risk Analysis In Security Cooperation
1:40 PM Matthew Kiesel USAFA Energy Analysis in the Asia-Pacific Theater
2:00 PM Noah Genovese US Air Force Academy, Department of Mathematical Sciences Use of Satellites to Model Atmospheric Density in Low Earth Orbit

 

Keystone Address:
Dr. Casey Fiesler

Talk Title:  Ethical Debt and Unintended Consequences in AI and Data Science
Talk Abstract:  Hardly a day passes without a new technology ethics scandal in the news, and many of them touch on AI, machine learning, and data science - from privacy violations in data collection to biased data feeding algorithms to unexpected uses of research. When tech companies and researchers come under fire, people wonder: why are they not thinking about potential harms? Unintended consequences of technology are a significant social issue, and when we “move fast and break things” it’s ethical considerations that often get pushed to the side. Like technical debt, the implied cost of future bug fixes when we rush to release technology, ethical debt is what we accumulate when we forget that data isn't just numbers and AI isn't just math. How can we help researchers, scientists, and technologists speculate about the future? Also how might we understand real impacts of technological harms on everyone, and give everyone the knowledge and tools to be more critical of technology?

 
Speaker Bio: Casey Fiesler is an assistant professor in the Department of Information Science at University of Colorado Boulder, where she directs the Internet Rules Lab and researches and teaches in the areas of online communities and technology ethics and governance. She is the recipient of a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation and her research has been covered in venues like The New York Times, WIRED, and Teen Vogue. She is also a passionate public scholar and creates educational content about computer science and ethics for TikTok (@professorcasey). She holds a PhD from Georgia Tech and a JD from Vanderbilt University Law School.

 

Registration Form
Registration is free to all participants.
The deadline for registration for students wishing to give a talk is Friday, February 18th
. 
Otherwise, the deadline for registration is Friday, February 25th.
Use the following link to register: https://forms.gle/pLovQKevaYgicGLt9

 


More Information
More information may be found on this conference web page (information will be updated as registration proceeds). If you have any questions, please contact the conference organizers Dr. Ike Agbanusi (iagbanusi@coloradocollege.edu) or Dr. Cory Scott (cbs@coloradocollege.edu)

 

 

Last updated February 7th, 2022

Report an issue - Last updated: 02/25/2022