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Course Listing by Geographic Area

East Asia

China-Related Courses

101 Elementary Chinese. Introduction to Mandarin Chinese, emphasis on basic grammar, speaking, and listening comprehension as well as mastery of some 500 characters for reading and writing. Language laboratory required. (Also listed as Chinese 101.) 2 units - Jiang

109 Chinese Meditative Arts. The history and philosophy of Chinese arts will be introduced with its applications for meditation, relaxation, concentration, and physical development. Short forms of Tai chi, Tai chi sword, and health-related techniques will be taught in conjunction with the art and practice of Chinese brush calligraphy and seal carving. Other art forms such as Chinese music, theater, and dance will be introduced briefly. The correlation/interface of the Chinese body movement and the arts practice would, hopefully, rekindle one's interest in and lead to further exploration of the Asian culture. (Also listed as Dance 102.) 1 unit - Wang

113, 114 Chinese Skill Maintenance. Conversation and limited reading and writing practice in Chinese language. Prerequisite: 101. (Also listed as Chinese 103, 104.) 1/4 unit each - Zhang

115 Conflict and Confluence in Asian Culture. Indian, Chinese, Japanese and Korean literature, art and politics with particular attention to interrelationships among Asian countries and their ongoing dialogue with Western cultures. Course includes a museum visit, a number of films, and opportunities to examine Asian art objects firsthand. Prerequisite: FYE course. First-Years only. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as AH115.) 2 units - Bentley.

117 Introduction to Asian Art. Introduction to Asian art in its historical and cultural context with emphasis on China, Japan, and India. (Also listed as Art History 113.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 2 units - Bentley

118 Civilization in East Asia. East Asian civilization from ancient to modern times. Cultural, social and political developments that shaped East Asian nations and their place in the modern world. Introduces basics of historical method: contextualization, analysis, and critical evaluation of primary sources and their significance. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.)(Also listed as History 109.) 2 units - Williams.

155 The Art of China. Chinese art from ancient to modern times in its cultural context. Artistic and archaeological materials will be examined in order to learn where, when, and how the culture we call Chinese evolved. Special attention will be given to attitudes toward art today, and to recent archaeological discoveries. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) Also listed as Art History 155.) 1 unit - Bentley

201 Intermediate Chinese I. The course emphasizes the development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills after the elementary level. Video materials supplement the course and place the language in a cultural context. Prerequisite: 102. (Also listed as Chinese 201.) 1 unit - Jiang

202 Advanced Intermediate Chinese II. The course builds on the language proficiency gained in 201. Increased use of the written and spoken language designed to build proficiency. Prerequisite: 201. (Also listed as Chinese 202.) 1 unit - Jiang and Zhang

211 Masterpieces of Chinese Literature in Translation. This course will acquaint students with major forms of Chinese fiction: pi-chi, ch'uan-ch'i, ppien-wen, hua-pen, kung-an, and the novel, as well as modern Chinese vernacular literature. (Also listed as Chinese 212.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Jiang

216 Confucianism. Close reading of primary philosophical and ethical texts in the classical and Neo-Confucian traditions, including the writings of Confucius, Mencius, and Wang Yang-ming, with attention as well to modern scholarly interpretations of this literature. The influence of Confucianism on East Asian civilizations in general. (Also listed as Religion 206.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Gardiner

217 China in the Age of Confucius. This course examines the origins of Chinese civilization, from the divination rituals of the Bronze Age Shang Dynasty to the might Han. Considers the great religious and philosophical traditions of China's axial age: Confucianism, Daoism, and others vying for influence in China's bloody "Warring States" period. Students will understand the political, economic, cultural and spiritual patterns that gave shape to classical Chinese civilization. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.)(Also listed as History 223.) 1 unit - Williams.

218 Taoism. Close reading of Lao- tzu's Tao te ching and the writings of Chuang-tzu, supplemented by modern scholarly treatments of this literature. We will explore such topics in religious and philosophical Taoism as the spontaneity and naturalness of Wu- Wei; the natural world as teacher; meditative and dietary practices; the Taoist church and its priests and rituals. (Also listed as Religion 208.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Gardiner

224 Chinese Women Writers and Their Works. This course will focus on a comparative study of the voice of Chinese women writers in the 1920s and 1980s, examine women writers' works in a social-historical context, and discuss the difference of women's places and problems in traditional Chinese culture and modern Chinese society. The course will also try to define the similar and different expressions of "feminism" as a term in the West and the East. (Also listed as Chinese 221 and Feminist and Gender Studies 224.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Jiang

229 20th Century China. This course will follow the turbulent history and politics of China from the Boxer Uprising of 1900 through the post-Mao reforms. Using primary documents, personal accounts, and scholarly studies, students will assess China's political and cultural changes and continuities in historical context. (Also listed as History 225.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Williams

242 Religion in China. Focuses on four aspects of religion in China: folk religion, Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. The course includes an introduction to Confucius' Analects and Lao-Tzu's Tao te ching; the Chinese transformation of Buddhism and the Buddhist transformation of China; the I ching; the significance of ancestor veneration; and the centrality of ideals of harmony on individual, social, and cosmic levels. (Also listed as Religion 243.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Gardiner

250 Topics in Asian Studies: Word and Image in Chinese and Japanese Art. Language opens the door to culture. This course will pay attention to the relationship between Chinese language and culture, and word and image. The course begins with the study of Chinese language with emphasis on basic grammar, speaking, and listening comprehension as well as mastery of some 250 Chinese characters for reading and writing (mainly in Block 1), and then introduces students to how Chinese language and philosophical thinking transformed ways of life for the East and to the major forms of Chinese literature and art such as poetry, painting, calligraphy and traditional Chinese garden (mainly in Block 2). This is an introductory course, which attempts to spark an interest in Chinese language and art and to lead students to study Chinese language and art in a broader social and cultural context. 1 unit- Jiang

250 Topics in Asian Literature & Culture: Chinese Calligraphy. An introduction to Chinese brushwork covering calligraphy, bamboo, orchid and tree painting, as well as some bird painting. .25 units- Tu

250 Topics in Asian Literature & Culture: Word and Image in Chinese and Japanese Art: This course will examine the relationship between literature and art in Chinese and Japanese tomb art, painting, prints, and ceramics. Due to its thematic nature, the course will not provide a comprehensive Asian art survey. In China, we will examine Confucian texts and Sima Qian's Records of the Historian in relation to the Wu shrines; and Neo-Daoist writings in relation to the Seven Sages to the Bamboo Grove tomb engravings. Then we will consider allusion sin Song painting to Tang and Song poetry; and the literary basis for Ming dynasty drama illustrations and printing playing cards. In Japan, we begin by examining Heian court poetry in relation to court art. We then consider the relationship between Zen writings and medieval monochrome ink paintings; and the role of the Zen church in the shifting aesthetics of the tea ceremony. The course concluded by investigating ironic juxtapositions of word and image in ukiyo-e woodblock prints. Prerequisite:100 level AH course or COI (AH 200.) 1 unit- Bentley

250 Topics in Asian Literature & Culture: Chinese Calligraphy. An introduction to Chinese brushwork covering calligraphy, bamboo, orchid and tree painting, as well as some bird painting. .25 units- Tu

250 Topics in Asian Literature & Culture: Hero! Honor, Outlaws & Order in East Asian History and Literature. From China's legends of Warring States assassins to the bloody epics of Johnny To; from Japan's medieval Tale of the Heike to Beat Takeshi's contemporary gangster dramas, this course explores East Asian visions of the heroic -- and their social underpinnings -- from the fourth century BCE to the present. Questions this course considers are: Are heroes outsiders or insiders? How do visions of the heroic change from the 'premodern' to the 'modern' eras? How do the media of cultural transmission change over the same period? How does the emergence of the nation-state shape representations of the heroic? Course texts include: Sima Qian's biographies of the assassin-retainers; the Tale of the Heike, The Romance of the Three Kingdoms, The Outlaws of the Marsh, samurai autobiography, The Forty-Seven Ronin, as well as films by Akira Kurosawa, Johnny To, Chen Kaige, and Kitano Takeshi. (Also listed as History 200. ) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Williams

302 Advanced Chinese Language. Intensive practice in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending modern Chinese. Prerequisite: 202. (Also listed as Chinese 301.) (Offered as an extended format course blocks 1-8.) 1 unit - Jiang

331 Comparative Politics: China. Emphasis on the period of reform and opening to the world after 1976 and the contemporary politics of the People's Republic of China. (Also listed as Political Science 331.) 1 unit - Ito

384 Cultural and Social History of China: This course is a detailed examination of the social and cultural order of late imperial China from roughly 1500 to 1800. It begins by considering the nature of the Ming (1368-1644) dynasty as a template for understanding late imperial Chinese society. Turning to themes of continuity and change during the 17th century Ming-Qing transition, we look at the new ruling elites, the Manchus, and the construction of their multi-ethnic Qing empire. The remainder of the course consists of in-depth consideration of various themes of late imperial history through the "High Qing" period of the 18th century including: the civil service examination system, literati culture, popular religion, family life and gender roles, and legal culture. (Also listed as History 384.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Williams

Japan-Related Courses

102 Elementary Japanese. Introduction to Japanese language. Students will be introduced to basic spoken and written structures of "standard" Japanese, the two Kana alphabets, approximately 70 kanji, and the development of the basic skills with attention to the cultural context. Language laboratory required. (Also listed as Japanese 101.) 2 units - Maruyama

105, 106 Beginning Japanese Skill Maintenance. Conversation and limited reading and writing practice in Japanese language. Prerequisite: 102. (Also listed as Japanese 103, 104.) 1/4 unit - Maruyama

117 Introduction to Asian Art. Introduction to Asian art in its historical and cultural context with emphasis on China, Japan, and India. (Also listed as Art History 113.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 2 units - Bentley

212 Japanese Literature in Translation. This course examines the way in which post-war Japanese literature reflects the transformation and enduring tensions within Japanese society. Topics include gender roles, the family, individuality, and dissension. Of central concern is the capacity of literature to reflect massive social and economic changes within contemporary Japan and to assess the assumptions of continuity, consensus, and conformity. Works by the following writers will be included: Ibuse Masuji, Yasuoka Shotaro, Hayashi Fumiko, Kawabata Yasunari, Abe Kobo, Enchi Fumiko, and Oe Kenzaburo. Novels and short stories will be supplemented with film and readings. Discussion, reading, and writing will be in English. (Also listed as Japanese 212.) (Not offered 2003-04.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Ericson

221 Intermediate Japanese I. The course emphasizes the development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills after the elementary level. Video materials supplement the course and place the language in a cultural context. Prerequisite: 102. (Also listed as Japanese 201.) 1 unit - Maruyama

222 Advanced Intermediate Japanese II. The course builds on the language proficiency gained in 201. Increased use of the written and spoken language designed to build proficiency. Prerequisite: 201. (Also listed as Japanese 202.) 1 unit - Maruyama

230 20th Century Japan. This course introduces students to the major processes shaping 20th century Japanese history. It begins by considering the nature of Tokugawa society as a means of understanding the changes wrought in the wake of the 1868 Meiji Restoration. After treating the Meiji transformation of Japanese society, the course turns to the creation of the Japanese empire in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, examining the ways this process impacted Japanese and non-Japanese subjects alike. The remainder of the course focuses on the empire's slide to war and its devastating consequences, finishing with an analysis of Japan's postwar resurrection and prosperity. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify the many causes and consequences of Japan's rapid modernization, mid-20th century debacle, and consequent revitalization, as well as their implications for 21st century geopolitics. (Also listed as History 226.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Williams

243 Religion in Japan. The course focuses on the strong influence of Chinese and Indian religious forms; the prevalence of religious syncretism; the centrality of ancestor veneration; views of nature and of sacred space; the tendency toward this-worldly, material concerns; the wide variety of "new religions" in Japan. (Also listed as Religion 243.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Gardiner

250 Topics in Asian Studies: Word and Image in Chinese and Japanese Art: This course will examine the relationship between literature and art in Chinese and Japanese tomb art, painting, prints, and ceramics. Due to its thematic nature, the course will not provide a comprehensive Asian art survey. In China, we will examine Confucian texts and Sima Qian's Records of the Historian in relation to the Wu shrines; and Neo-Daoist writings in relation to the Seven Sages to the Bamboo Grove tomb engravings. Then we will consider allusion sin Song painting to Tang and Song poetry; and the literary basis for Ming dynasty drama illustrations and printing playing cards. In Japan, we begin by examining Heian court poetry in relation to court art. We then consider the relationship between Zen writings and medieval monochrome ink paintings; and the role of the Zen church in the shifting aesthetics of the tea ceremony. The course concludes by investigating ironic juxtapositions of word and image in ukiyo-e woodblock prints. Prerequisite:100 level AH course or COI (AH 200.) 1 unit- Bentley

250 Topics in Asian Studies: Fantasy and the Fantastic in Japanese History and Literature. This course surveys changing approaches to fantasy and the fantastic in Japanese literature and culture from antiquity to the present. Drawing on elements of both elite and popular culture - including myths, history, plays, fables, ghost stories, graphic novels, films and fiction - the course explores the historical roots of the hyper-stylized imagery and aesthetics of contemporary arts, such as anime. A close reading of the history of the evolving narrative styles and sensibilities provides an in-depth perspective on how popular cultural forms critique historical experience and orthodox discourse in Japan. (Also listed as History 200, Comparative Literature 200, Japanese 250) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 Unit - Ericson, Williams

250 Topics in Asian Literature & Culture: Hero! Honor, Outlaws & Order in East Asian History and Literature. From China's legends of Warring States assassins to the bloody epics of Johnny To; from Japan's medieval Tale of the Heike to Beat Takeshi's contemporary gangster dramas, this course explores East Asian visions of the heroic -- and their social underpinnings -- from the fourth century BCE to the present. Questions this course considers are: Are heroes outsiders or insiders? How do visions of the heroic change from the 'premodern' to the 'modern' eras? How do the media of cultural transmission change over the same period? How does the emergence of the nation-state shape representations of the heroic? Course texts include: Sima Qian's biographies of the assassin-retainers; the Tale of the Heike, The Romance of the Three Kingdoms, The Outlaws of the Marsh, samurai autobiography, The Forty-Seven Ronin, as well as films by Akira Kurosawa, Johnny To, Chen Kaige, and Kitano Takeshi. (Also listed as History 200. ) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Williams

251 Japanese Women Writers. Japanese women writers wrote the most heralded and poetic diaries in the classical literary canon; this celebration of women's literary contributions is an anomaly among world literatures. Yet for over five hundred years, women's literary voices were silenced before reemerging in the modern era, when a renaissance of "women's literature" (joryu bungaku) captured popular imagination, even as it confronted critical disparagement. This course traces the rise, fall, and return of writing by women and the influence of attitudes toward gender on what was written and read through a wide array of literary texts, historical documents, and cultural artifacts. (Also listed as Feminist and Gender Studies 251.) 1 unit - Ericson

255 The Art of Japan. Salient developments in the art and architecture of Japan from prehistoric to modern times. Emphasis on the religious, philosophical, and historical background. Prerequisite: 155 or consent of instructor. (Also listed as Art History 255.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Bentley

301 Advanced Japanese Language. Intensive practice in reading, writing, speaking, and comprehending modern Japanese. Prerequisite: 202 or consent of instructor. (Also listed as Japanese 301.) 1 unit (Offered as Extended Format) - department

326 Japanese Politics. This course examines whether Western political theory can be used to understand the politics of Japan. (Also listed as Political Science 326.) 1 unit - department

385 Twentieth Century Japan. Japanese ways of life and thought and the interaction of local social patterns with government and the elite ideals. Focuses on the Tokugawa shogunate in the 18th century. (May be offered with Writing Emphasis.) Prerequisite: previous study of Japan or consent of instructor. (Also listed as History 328.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Williams

South Asia

117 Introduction to Asian Art. Introduction to Asian art in its historical and cultural context with emphasis on China, Japan, and India. (Also listed as Art History 113.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 2 units - Bentley

160 Hinduism A historical and thematic introduction to Hindu tradition from prehistoric India to the present day, focusing on classic texts and popular rituals. Topics include the Rig Veda, the Upanisads and the rise of Buddhism, the great epics (Mahabharata and Ramayana), Yoga, the Bhagavadgita, Indian art and music, devotional movements and poetry, Goddess worship, dharma, the caste system, Hindu nationalism, Gandhi, and Indian independence. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Religion 160.) 1 unit - Coleman.

199 Islam. A historical and thematic introduction to Islam that focuses on texts, doctrines, practices, institutions, and artistic expressions. Topics will include the life and times of Prophet Muhammad; Islam's foundational scripture, the Qur'an; the two major sectarian movements of Islam - Sunni and Shi'a; the mystical quest of the Sufis; and regional variation of Muslim faith and practice. (Also listed as Religion 201.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Coleman

203 Buddhism. An introduction to the life and times of the Buddha, his basic teachings, and central monastic and lay practices. Emphases include key elements in the development of Buddhist philosophy, the purposes and styles of meditation, and theory and practice in Zen and Tibetan Buddhism. (Also listed as Religion 203.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Gardiner

204 Hinduism. An introduction to the Hindu religious tradition. Topics will include the scripture, myths, beliefs, and rituals of Hinduism from Vedic times to the present, with emphasis on appreciating the variety of religious systems, symbols, and practices through the study of sacred texts, social structures, and rites of worship. Attention also to the presence and influence of Hinduism in the West. (Also listed as Religion 204.) (Meets the Alternative Perspectives: B requirement.) 1 unit - Coleman

208 Yoga. This course introduces the student to the movements and techniques of Yoga. (Also listed as Dance 209.) 1/4 unit - Berg

220 Philosophies of India. The development of Indian philosophy from its roots in the Vedic tradition of Hinduism. Attention will be focused on the metaphysical, ethical, and epistemological systems that grew out of the Hindu scriptures and the challenges to Hinduism posed by Buddhism and philosophical materialism. Prerequisite: one course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. (Also listed as Philosophy 220.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2001-02.) 1 unit - Lee

223 From Bombay to Bollywood: Music and the Popular Indian Film. Since the 1930s, the presence of the film song sequence has been a hallmark of Indian popular cinema, to the extent that film song sequences and songs often play an important role in helping promote the films they appear in. This course examines how film music has helped define Bombay cinema as the global industry now known as "Bollywood", as well as how film song sequences work within and outside films' narratives to create a unique aesthetic. Although international audiences have enjoyed Bombay films and film music since the 1950s, the term "Bollywood" did not emerge until the late 1980s. Since then, it has often accompanied descriptions of Bombay films' transformation from a regional industry into a multimedia global brand- experienced through cinema; the Internet; satellite television; music and video recordings; radio; and ring tones, almost all of which feature music at their core. This viewing-intensive course surveys older as well as recent popular Bombay films and explores their film songs' stylistic conventions, context within films, and their life outside the cinema hall. In doing so, students trace the shift from Bombay to "Bollywood" as well as gain a fundamental understanding of South Asian popular culture. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Anthropology 222 and Music 233.) 1 unit - Bhattacharjya.

233 Women, Religion, and Society: Hinduism, Islam, and Buddhism. An exploration of constructions of gender and the status of women in Hindu, Islamic, and Buddhist cultures, with attention to both texts and practices. Readings survey a variety of topics, including marriage, sexuality, sati, Islamic law, devotion, renunciation, and tanta. (Also listed as Women's Studies 233 and Religion 233.) 1 unit - Coleman

250 Popular Music from South Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. This course explores popular music from South Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa - as well from these regions' diasporic populations in the United States and Europe. Throughout the course, we consider how technology, mass media, and migration have over the last century shaped and still shape communities' respective cultural identities, particularly in the contemporary context of globalization. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Anthropology 222 and Music 232.)1 unit - Bhattacharjya

257 Women in Hinduism and Buddhism An exploration of constructions of gender and the status of women in Hinduism and Buddhism, with primary focus on normative developments in ancient and medieval India and the impact of this formative history on the lives of contemporary women. Readings from primary and secondary materials, with attention to both ideology and practice. (Also listed as Religion 357 and Feminist & Gender Studies 257.) (Offered in alternate years.)

290 Studying Asia. An interdisciplinary study of cultures, peoples, and historical experience of several societies of Asia (South Asia, Southeast Asia, and East Asia) through comparative case studies and theoretical readings. Students will analyze a variety of primary and secondary sources in English translation and learn techniques for interpreting cultures very different from our own. (This seminar is required of Asian Studies majors and must be completed before beginning Senior Thesis blocks.) Prerequisite: one Asian Studies course. 1 unit - Program

350 Advanced Topics in Asian Studies. Study of a selected topic in one or more Asian societies and cultures. The course will cover subjects not listed in the regular curriculum and may vary from year to year. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Asian Studies Program Faculty or Visiting Faculty

352 Holy Men, Manly Men: Gods, Buddhas and Gurus in South Asia. 1 unit - Coleman.

361 Topics in South Asian Religions: Poetic Devotion: Singing the Praises of God. A study of various devotional movements from classical and medieval periods, focusing mainly on Hindu bhakti, with some attention to Islamic mysticism as well. Readings include poems by both men and women who celebrate their love for Krishna, Siva, Allah, and the Great Goddesses. Prerequisite: 204 or consent of instructor. (Also listed as Religion 361.) 1 unit - Coleman.

362 Bhakti: Devotion in South Asia A study of diverse Hindu devotional movements from classical and medieval periods. Primary readings include poetry by both men and women, devotees of Vishnu, Krishna, Shiva, Rama, and the Great Goddess. Critical articles help situate the devotees and their songs in cultural context. Prerequisite: Religion 160 or consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Religion 362.) 1 unit - Coleman.

363 Devi: Goddesses of India. A study of various Hindu goddesses, including their iconography and particular powers, as well as the ritualistic ways in which they are worshipped in diverse regions of India, with a glimpse of feminist appropriations of Kali in the West as well. Primary and secondary readings include poetry, theology, and historical-critical studies. Films depict a variety of rituals. Prerequisite: Religion 160 or consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Coleman.

370 Systems of Buddhist Thought and Practice. The topic for this course will vary from year to year. The subject matter will draw from areas such as schools of Buddhist philosophy, traditions of meditation, and the writings of renowned Buddhist authors. Prerequisite: Religion 203. (Also listed as Religion 370.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit - Gardiner

400 Thesis. Thesis subject chosen by student and approved by the program prior to the beginning of the course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 unit each - Asian Studies Faculty

Southeast Asia

131, 132 Balinese Gamelan. Study and performance of the Balinese gamelan angklung orchestral tradition. Group lessons for all levels, developing skills in technique, musicianship, and repertory. Meets twice a week. Performances on and off campus. Open without audition. (Also listed as Music 131, 132.) (adjunct) 1/4 unit -- Lasmawan

200 Southeast Asian Politics. By providing an overview of states and societies in pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial Southeast Asia, this course aims to make sense of key forces which have shaped the region's diverse political systems today-the military juntas in Burma and Thailand, the socialist regime in Vietnam, single party dominant systems in Singapore and Malaysia, and multiparty presidential systems in Indonesia and the Philippines. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Political Science 243.) 1 unit - Ito.

208 Balinese Dance. This course, taught by a native Indonesian artist, introduces traditional Balinese dance. (One semester, extended format, blocks 1-4 and/or blocks 5-8.) (Also listed as Dance 209.) 1/4 unit - Lasmawan

290 Studying Asia. An interdisciplinary study of cultures, peoples, and historical experience of several societies of Asia (South Asia, Southeast Asia, and East Asia) through comparative case studies and theoretical readings. Students will analyze a variety of primary and secondary sources in English translation and learn techniques for interpreting cultures very different from our own. (This seminar is required of Asian Studies majors and must be completed before beginning Senior Thesis blocks.) Prerequisite: one Asian Studies course. 1 unit - Program

295 Indonesian Music. Surveys Indonesian history, culture, society, religion, and aesthetic values through music. Students become familiar with a variety of Indonesian musical repertories, styles, and performance contexts, including court traditions of Java, Sunda, and Bali and village traditions throughout the Indonesian archipelago. Traditional as well as new musics are discussed. (Also listed as Music 295 and Anthropology 295.) 1 unit - Lasmawan and Levine

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