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Classics-English

Applicable for the 2016-2017 academic year.

The classics/English major provides the possibility for students to enhance their study of English and the classics by learning the language(s) that most deeply influenced English (over 60 percent is either Latin or Greek), and the literary subject matter that is the primary material from which later centuries in the West created their literature. For example, reading the Odyssey in Greek cannot help but deepen one’s knowledge and appreciation of Joyce’s Ulysses, learning mythology, such as Ovid’s Metamorphoses in Latin, is of paramount importance in understanding Shakespeare and many other authors.

The joint major allows students to take advantage of classics courses as well as one (or both) of the ancient languages to benefit their English literature training and vice versa.

This major starts from the observation that English and classics reinforce each other. Classical genres underlie modern poetry, drama, and fiction, and most writers in English, into the 20th-century, have studied classical languages (at least Latin) and literature, so that classics is an important interpretive context for them. Moreover, English literature responds to classics in ways that are important for classics itself. We therefore allow students to complete slightly less work in each department than they would need to graduate with the single major. 

Major Requirements

Requirements: Normal requirements are between 9 and 12 units as follows:

  • Classical Language (Greek or Latin), including one block at the 300 level in one classical language (1 unit minimum)
  • Introduction to literary study and interpretation (2 units): English 250 (or Comparative Literature 210): Introduction to Literary Theory, and English 221: Introduction to Poetry
  • English courses at the 300 or 400 level covering at least two of the following five periods (2 units):
    • Medieval-Renaissance (excluding Shakespeare)
    • Shakespeare
    • 18th century
    • 19th century
    • 20th/21st centuries
  • At least two classics courses covering the genres of literature, drama, or mythology (2 units minimum)
  • The department of classics written and oral examination over the department’s reading list
  • Senior Thesis (2 units minimum): English 480 (1 unit, the 1-block senior seminar) plus either English 499 or Classics 431 (Independent Senior Thesis, 1 unit minimum).  The senior thesis project is to be co-directed and co-evaluated by two faculty members, one from classics and one from English.  It will be evaluated on the basis of its sophistication in the methodologies of both disciplines.

Total units required: 9-12.

Both departments also recommend study of a modern language to a level allowing literary reading.

Department: Classics

Courses

Classics

CL101 Greek for Beginners

Introduction to the structure and vocabulary of classical Greek, with attention to those features that form the classical basis of Biblical koine and for the classical side of Greek diglossia from Hellenistic times through the 20th century. Short texts from Homer to Kazantzakis and Cavafy provide practice in literary, philosophical and rhetorical reading and initiation in major areas of Western thought. Attention to the history of the language and its relation to ancient, medieval and modern culture. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units — Buxton

CL103 Review of Elementary Greek

A lower-level maintenance course for students who plan to continue their study of Greek. A systematic review of grammar with supervised readings and translation practice. Prerequisite: Classics 101 or equivalent. .25 unit. (Not offered 2016-17).

.25 unit

CL104 Review of Elementary Greek

A lower-level maintenance course for students who plan to continue their study of Greek. A systematic review of grammar with supervised reading and translation practice. Prerequisite: Classics 101 or equivalent. .25 unit.

.25 unit — Wise

CL111 Latin for Beginners

Introduction to the structure of classical Latin; reading of short texts from Plautus to Milton and Newton to provide practice in literary and rhetorical reading and initiation in major areas of western thought. Attention to the history of the language and its relation to ancient, medieval and modern culture. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units — Thakur

CL113 Review of Elementary Latin

A lower-level maintenance course for students who plan to continue their study of Latin. A systematic review of grammar with supervised reading and translation practice. Prerequisite: Classics 111 or equivalent. .25 unit.

CL114 Review of Elementary Latin

A lower-level maintenance course for students who plan to continue their study of Latin. A systematic review of grammar with supervised reading and translation practice. Prerequisite: Classics 111 or equivalent. .25 unit.

Prerequisite: First Year Experience Course, Freshmen Only.

.25 unit — Wise

CL115 Introduction to Classical Literature and Archaeology:

Introduction to Ancient Greek and Roman cultures through reading of original sources and an examination of material culture. Part One: literature from various genres (such as epic, dramatic, lyric and philosophical); modern ways of receiving and interpreting them. Part Two: art, architecture and topography of ancient Greece and Rome. This course will consider the long-standing influence these civilizations played in the development of later Western cultures, and will examine modern outcomes and parallels to the historical forms and movements, such as Athenian democracy as a precedent for American democracy, colonization in antiquity and European colonialism in the c. 16-19, and the Roman Empire as a precedent for the expansive American State of late c. 19 to the present. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

1 unit — Thakur

CL116 Greek History and Philosophy: Self and Soul from Antiquity to Modernity

Aegean and Greek archaeological, historical, literary and philosophical texts, with emphasis on ideas formative of Western culture. The development and transformations of these ideas as reflected in selected texts from the early Christian era, the Enlightenment, and the Modern Age. We concentrate on concepts of what it means to be human, and the relation of individuals to community, nature, and the divine in such authors as Homer, Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Dante, Descartes, Goethe, Nietzsche, and Heidegger (Also listed as History 116 and Philosophy 116.)

2 units — Dobson, Riker

CL117 Concepts of Freedom from Ancient to Modern Times

This interdisciplinary course explores enduring questions in the Western tradition: What does it mean to be free? What are the basic ideas of freedom that figure prominently in the Western tradition? What is freedom for? Is there a rational use of freedom? Discussion will spring from readings in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy, politics, religion and literature, and complementary films.

CL118 Myth, Gender and Metamorphosis in the Ancient Mediterranean

An exploration of Greek, Roman and Near Eastern myths in the ancient Mediterranean, emphasizing metamorphoses thematically across cultures, with attention to the (imagined) other in gender and society. Readings will include selections from Mesopotamian literature (Enuma Elish, The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Hymns to Inanna), Greece and Rome (Hesiod’s Theogony, the Homeric Hymns, the Greek dramatists and Aristophanes, Sappho, Sulpicia and Ovid’s Metamorphoses, among others), and accompanying art and archaeological evidence. (Not offered 2016-17).

.5 unit

CL121 Intensive Latin Grammar Review and Reading Practice

Intensive Latin Grammar Review and Reading Practice. This course will use a morphological and syntactic approach to review and practice the essential structures and concepts of Latin grammar. It is intended to prepare students for courses at the 200 level.

Prerequisite: Classics 111, placement above Classics 111 on department placement test or consent of department.

.5 unit

CL125 The Ancient Mediterranean

Survey of the civilizations that flourished in and around Mesopotamia, Egypt, Syria-Palestine, Greece and Italy from the time of the first cities (3000 BC) to the rise of Islam (seventh century AD). Beyond providing a historical overview, the course explores the surprising ways in which the various peoples of this area influenced one another culturally. We will also learn about the different types of evidence, both literary and archaeological, on which knowledge of the ancient world is based. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

1 unit — Buxton

CL160 Race, Ethnicity, and Prejudice in the Ancient World

An introduction to the theoretical concept of ethnicity and related issues as they played out in the ancient Mediterranean world. In particular, a focus on the way Greeks and Romans defined themselves and distinguished themselves from other peoples as a way of assigning meaning to the universe, and how those attitudes motivated their behavior towards outsiders. Also an examination of the practical effects of such discourses on the lives of people who lived in Greek and Roman communities without belonging to the dominant groups, and some of the ways in which modern approaches to race and ethnicity have structured and sometimes distorted our collective understanding of the past. The materials studied include literary, artistic, and archaeological evidence, as well as modern scholarship.

CL200 Latin Language

Latin Language course taken on Mediterranean Semester Program. (Not offered 2016-17).

.75 to 1 unit

CL201 Reading in Greek:

Introduction to Greek literature, including Homer and dramatic, philosophical or historical writing.

Prerequisite: Classics 101 or consent of instructor.

.5 or 1 unit — Cramer

CL202 Reading in Greek:

Introduction to Greek literature, including Homer and dramatic, philosophical or historical writing.

Prerequisite: Classics 101 or consent of instructor.

.5 or 1 unit — Dobson

CL203 Review of Intermediate Greek

An upper-level maintenance course for students who plan to continue their study of Greek. A systematic review of grammar with reading and translation practice. Prerequisite: Classics 201 or equivalent. .25 unit. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

CL204 Review of Intermediate Greek

An upper-level maintenance course for students who plan to continue their study of Greek. A systematic review of grammar with reading and translation practice. Prerequisite: Classics 201 or equivalent. .25 unit.

.25 unit — Wise

CL209 Late Antiquity

Continuity and change from Roman antiquity to the Christian Middle Ages in the art and architecture of Mediterranean lands (200-600 A. D.). The 'decline' of Rome and the development of Christian imagery will be studied through art, archaeological sites, and texts-writings from the time as well as later historians.

Prerequisite: Art History 111, 112 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Kolarik

CL210 Greek Philosophy

Major writers and schools from the thousand year history of Greek philosophical research in the areas of nature, the gods, the mind, and ways of life: Ionian and Italian Pre-Socratics, Plato and the Academy, Aristotle, Pyrrho, the Cynics, the Stoa, Epicurus and Lucretius, and the revival in Late Antiquity of Pyrronian Scepticism and Platonism. Emphasis on close reading of the texts (including certain Greek terms) and on critical and comparative writing.

1 unit — Daly

CL211 Reading in Latin:

Various ancient and medieval Latin works.

Prerequisite: Classics 111 or consent of instructor.

.5 or 1 unit — Cramer, Thakur

CL212 Reading in Latin:

Various ancient and medieval Latin works.

Prerequisite: Classics 211: 111 or 2yrs HS Latin. Classics 311: 212. Classics 411: 311,312. All are 'or consent of instructor'.

.5 or 1 unit — Thakur

CL213 Review of Intermediate Latin

An upper-level maintenance course for students who plan to continue their study of Latin. A systematic review of grammar with reading and translation practice. Prerequisite: Classics 211 or equivalent. .25 unit.

CL214 Review of Intermediate Latin

An upper-level maintenance course for students who plan to continue their study of Latin. A systematic review of grammar with reading and translation practice. Prerequisite: Classics 211 or equivalent. .25 unit.

Prerequisite: Completion of AP:A required.

.25 unit — Wise

CL216 History of the Roman Republic

Focus on the development of Rome, from a small city ruled by kings, to a regional power ruled under a Republic. The course will trace Rome's expansion through Italy, its conflict with Carthage and will closely examine the end of the Republic. Individuals discussed will include the Gracchi, generals Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Caesar, and Rome's greatest politician (and author) Cicero. (Also listed as History 216.) (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

CL218 Homer

The Iliad and Odyssey as oral traditional poems, preservers of Bronze Age and archaic lore, locus of the creation of classical Greek culture and predecessors of European epic; together with Hesiodic epic and Homeric hymns. Reading in English with attention to the formal Greek diction and the problems of translation, except that students who know Greek will read parts of the original text.

1 unit — Cramer

CL219 Greek Drama: Origins and Early Forms of Theater

A study of origins, early texts, performance practices and developing theatrical conventions in various cultures, with special emphasis on ancient Greek and Roman theatre.

1 unit — Hughes, Lindblade

CL220 Myth & Meaning

Religion and myth of ancient Greece and Rome in relation to that of the ancient Mediterranean (Akkadian, Hittite, Sumerian, Egyptian). Female presence in art, literature and religion compared to treatment of women in their respective cultures. Theoretical approaches to the understanding of myth (Comparative, Jungian, Structuralist) in relation to myths as they are encoded in their specific cultures. Students may trace a myth through Medieval, Renaissance and modern transformations in art, music, poetry and film, or study myth in other cultures (e.g. Norse and Celtic). May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit — Dobson

CL221 The Invention of History

Herodotus, sometimes called the 'father of lies,' and Thucydides, sometimes called the first political scientist, treated as the first historians. Study of the ways of conceiving history and its relation to the peoples and periods explored. No Greek or Latin required.

1 unit — Cramer

CL222 Topics:

Courses vary from year to year, to include offerings in classical and comparative religion and mythology, history, language and literature, anthropology, archaeology and women's studies supplementary to those offered in the catalog. No Greek or Latin required.

1 unit — Lee, Mason, Reaves

CL223 Art of Greece & Rome

Surveys the art and architecture of Greece and Rome from their origins in Bronze Age Greece to their transformation in the late Roman Empire using methods of art history and archaeology. Ancient Greek cities and sanctuaries with emphasis on Athens and the monuments of the Acropolis. The spread of Hellenism and the formation of an imperial visual language under Alexander the Great and his successors. The influence of Etruscan and Greek art in the Roman Republic. Imperial monuments of the city of Rome and throughout the empire as instruments of power. The class will consider political and social factors in the formation and utilization of Classical forms in both ancient and modern times. (Also listed as AH 207). (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

CL226 Roman History: Literature and Culture of the Augustan Age

Focus on the development of the Roman state in the late first century B.C. under the emperor Augustus. The city, its monuments, its art, its literature, bureaucracy and territorial expansion, the role of women, and various social and minority groups will all be discussed. In particular, the course will emphasize important and influential literary figures, such as Horace, Ovid, Propertius, Virgil and Augustus himself.

1 unit — Buxton

CL227 The Ancient Economy

A survey of economic life in ancient Greece and Rome, which involved both primitive subsistence agriculture and a complex international marketplace of luxury goods—often tightly regulated by predatory states. Topics will include the essential but diverse role of slavery, why debt crises plagued rich and poor alike, the degree to which banking facilitated international trade, and how governments manipulated the silver content of coinage to cover budget shortfalls or finance armies. Also considered are the reasons behind the invention and spread of coinage as a medium of exchange.

CL236 History of the Roman Empire

Focus on how conservative Roman republican ideals were reconciled with an increasingly Hellenized empire dominated by an imperial dynasty. Following a brief survey of prior Roman history, the course will examine the development of the Roman state in the first century AD under the Julio-Claudian emperors. The course will proceed to consider the Empire’s evolution and management under subsequent Flavian and Antonine dynasties. The city, its monuments, its art, its literature, bureaucracy and territorial expansion, the role of women, various social and minority groups, and the growth of Christianity will all be discussed.

CL250 History of Classical Greece

A survey of the development and expansion of Greek city states (known as “poleis”) from their emergence in the eighth century BC to Greece’s conquest by Philip II of Macedonia, father of Alexander the Great. Particular attention will be paid to Athens and Sparta, the two great powers of this period. The class will examine Greece’s political institutions (How direct was direct democracy?), social relations (What were the lived realities of women, foreigners and slaves?) and intellectual history (especially the rise of rhetoric to better persuade mass audiences in a democracy). Readings will draw on ancient historians (Herodotus, Thucydides), political theorists (Plato, Aristotle), satirists (Aristophanes) and statesmen (Demosthenes, Lysias, Xenophon).

1 unit

CL252 Age of Alexander the Great

An examination of the life of Alexander the Great and the ancient Mediterranean world in which he lived. Also considered are the impact he had on the historical development of that world after his death, the political use of his legacy from antiquity to the 21st century, and the fascination he continues to inspire.

CL255 The Life of the Soul

Since the beginning of time, humans have been searching into the nature of the soul, its life and its meanings. Starting from the Greeks, this course seeks to discover how the concept of “soul” is understood, and how its life is conceived. We will explore the roots of these questions in ancient Greek epic, drama and philosophy, how these answers transform in medieval and renaissance literature, and how modernity offers strikingly new answers to them. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

CL260 Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World

An introductory survey of issues relating to gender and sexuality in Greece and Rome. The focus will be on the role of women in ancient society and their characterization in literature. Though our sources are dominated by male perspectives, the class will attempt a balanced and accurate picture of ancient society. The course will also place these literary depictions in the broader context of art, political and societal structure, religious belief and family relations. Authors examined will include Hesiod, Homer, Aristophanes, Virgil, the female poets Sappho and Sulpicia, Ovid, and many more. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

CL275 Ancient Sports and Entertainment

The course considers the role sport and entertainment played in ancient society. We begin by examining athletics in the Greek world, specifically the Olympics and other major games. We will discuss the different types of events and then consider the evolving role athletics played in Greek education and society. We will then transition to the Roman world, examining gladiatorial games, chariot racing, the theatre, and the Olympics in the Roman period. We will trace the development of the status of athletes from amateurs to the professionalization of sport, and pause to consider the place of musicians and actors in Greek and Roman society. Throughout the course students will become familiar with the architecture of related venues and investigate the role of spectators. Students will continually be challenged to relate ancient athletics to the sports of today. Sources will include Homer, Pindar, Virgil, Ovid, Martial and various inscriptions.

1 unit — Thakur

CL299 Independent Study

Supervised readings or investigations in areas of interest to the students that are not covered in regular Classics Department offerings. Readings and/or investigations to be followed up with discussions and written reports. Must be approved by the Chair on behalf of the Department, in addition to the supervising professor.

Prerequisite: consent of department.

1 unit — Cramer, Thakur

CL301 Advanced Reading in Greek:

Further exploration of ancient, medieval or modern Greek literature, done as independent reading.

Prerequisite: Classics 202 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit — Cramer

CL302 Advanced Reading in Greek:

Further exploration of ancient, medieval or modern Greek literature, done as independent reading.

Prerequisite: Classics 202 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit — Dobson

CL303 Review of Greek with Emphasis on Rhetorical and Poetic Reading Skills

Prerequisite: Classics 301. .25 Unit.

CL304 Review of Greek with Emphasis on Rhetorical and Poetic Reading Skills

Prerequisite: Classics 301.

.25 unit — Wise

CL311 Advanced Reading in Latin:

Further exploration of ancient or medieval Latin literature.

Prerequisite: Classics 212 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit — Cramer, Thakur

CL312 Advanced Reading in Latin:

Further exploration of ancient or medieval Latin literature.

Prerequisite: Classics 212.

.5 unit — Thakur

CL313 Review of Latin with Emphasis on Rhetorical and Poetic Reading Skills

Prerequisite: Classics 311. .25 unit.

CL314 Review of Latin with Emphasis on Rhetorical and Poetic Reading Skills

Prerequisite: Classics 311.

.25 unit — Wise

CL322 Advanced Topics:

Study for advanced students in the languages, arts, drama and literature.

.5 unit — Cramer

CL401 Directed Readings in Greek:

Independent study of various authors and special topics.

Prerequisite: 301, 302.

.5 unit — Cramer

CL402 Directed Readings in Greek:

Independent study of various authors and special topics.

Prerequisite: 301, 302.

.5 unit — Dobson

CL411 Directed Readings in Latin:

Independent study of various authors and special topics.

Prerequisite: 311, 312 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit — Cramer, Thakur

CL412 Directed Readings in Latin:

Independent study of various authors and special topics.

Prerequisite: 311, 312.

.5 unit — Thakur

CL431 Thesis

Thesis subjects chosen by student and approved by department. Senior Classics, Classics-History-Politics and Classics - English majors.

Prerequisite: Senior Majors Only.

1 unit — Cramer, Thakur

English

EN201 Introduction to Literature

The forms of literary expression and experience; the purposes of literature; the relationship between form and content, and genre and theme; the differences between poetry and prose; the approaches to meanings in texts; the analysis of how a work can be both universal and a product of a particular historical period and society. Emphasis on Western tradition, with readings from antiquity to the modern age. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 to 2 units

EN203 Tradition and Change in Literature

The study of a single theme or subject as it emerges in selected periods of literature, chiefly English and American, from the Renaissance to the 20th century. Attention will be directed toward the Classical and Medieval origins of texts and traditions. The historical periods and the subjects will vary from section to section and from year to year. The focus will be upon such themes and subjects as nature, cities, love, oppression, satire, the epic, narrative, and critical tradition and revolt. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units

EN205 Study of Genre

Examines a single literary genre or mode such as pastoral, epistle, romance, tragedy, or satire within and across a range of historical periods and cultural and national contexts. May include related theoretical and critical readings. (Not offered 2016-17).

.5 unit

EN207 Masterpieces of Literature: Greeks to Modern

Major works of literature by authors from antiquity to modern times, including Homer, Greek dramatists, Dante, Shakespeare and selected authors from later periods. (Offered in some years with Writing Intensive.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 to 2 units

EN211 Introduction to Fiction

An introduction to narrative fiction. (Offered in some years with Writing Intensive.) (Not offered 2016-17).

1 to 2 units

EN215 Creativity: Theory and Practice

Examines creativity from both a theoretical and a practical standpoint. The course is divided into three sections. The first explores theoretical material on creativity as an individual process and practical exercises on generating creative material. The second examines creativity as a product of social groups, especially as this relates to the issue of 'craft'. The third focuses on creativity as it is tied to particular times and places and practical issues of making creative products public. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN221 Introduction to Poetry

Introduction to close reading of poetry through a wide range of poems. Students will learn the terminology and techniques used to analyze poetry and employ these in readings of poems, and will become familiar with a variety of poetic forms and traditions.

1 unit — Evitt, Hilberry, Mason, Richman

EN223 The Bible as Literature

The Bible considered as one of the great literary works of the Western world and, in the King James translation, a masterpiece of English prose. Emphasis on its narrative structure, its characterization, and the beauty and power of its language, with some attention to its influence on later works of literature. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN225 Introduction to Shakespeare

An introduction to Shakespeare’s dramatic works through four to seven representative plays

1 unit — Stefanek

EN250 Introduction to Literary Theory

An introduction to literary theory and criticism. Students will study selected poetry, plays and fiction through leading methods such as New Criticism, Structuralism, Deconstruction, and New Historicism, with attention to such topics as Psychoanalytic, Marxist, Feminist, and Post-Colonial approaches. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own critical approaches.

1 unit — Butte, Davis, Sarchett

EN251 Introduction to Native American Literature

Provides a broad overview of Native American literature through a range of genres, modes, and media. Builds a Native-centered understanding of the Native American literary terrain and evaluates former and current expectations set upon Native American literature by studying the social, cultural, historical, and literary contexts of which each generation of Native American writers/artists have engaged in subtle, sweeping, restorative, and/or even problematic ways. Identifies and studies key concepts, terms, and methods by tracing chronologically themes such as settler colonialism and genocidal trauma; tribal sovereignty and current social issues; and, stereotypes, tropes and modern Native American identity and conflicts of authenticity, as well as survival models of resistance and recovery for Indigenous peoples in literature. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN253 The Literature of the American Southwest

The literature of the Native Americans, the Spanish, and the Anglos. Readings in transcribed poetry and song, diaries, folk literature, and modern authors such as D. H. Lawrence, Willa Cather, Edward Abbey, Rudolfo Anaya, and Leslie Silko. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN259 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer Literature

Introduces features of what might be called a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer literary and theoretical tradition. Uses classical, Renaissance, modern postmodern, and contemporary literature, criticism, and film to examine the complicated status and experience of non-majority sexualities. Considers writers, theorists and activists who have explored the relationships among sexuality, knowledge, and literature, including Plato, Michel Foucault, Oscar Wilde, Shakespeare, Nella Larsen, James Baldwin and Alison Bechdel.

1 unit — Love

EN275 Comics and Graphic Narrative

Explores the history and craft of graphic narrative from the eighteenth century to the contemporary moment. Students will consider how the medium of comics negotiates both visuality and textuality by tracing the role of typography and iconography in the development of graphic narrative from its designation as pop cultural ephemera to high literary and artistic form. Considers writers and theorists such as Roland Barthes, Scott McCloud, W.J.T. Mitchell, Marshall McLuhan, Lynd Ward, Will Eisner, Art Spiegelman, Marjane Satrapi, Daniel Clowes, Chris Ware, Alan Moore, and Alison Bechdel. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN280 Topics in Literature:

Studies in a wide array of cultural, social, historical, generic, and aesthetic topics in British and American literature. Designed for first-year students, sophomores, non-majors, as well as majors.

.5 or 1 or 2 units — Butte, Evitt, Garcia, Goodwin

EN281 Topics in Literature: 'The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

In-depth study of one author or one major literary work (Not offered 2016-17).

.5 unit

EN282 Beginning Poetry Writing

Practice in writing poetry.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & English 221.

2 units — Hilberry, Wall

EN283 Beginning Fiction Writing

Practice in writing prose fiction.

2 units — Pulley

EN284 Screenwriting

Examines the fundamentals of screenwriting: theme and meaning, structure, narrative, dialogue, character development, and revision. Students will read, analyze, and discuss the screenplays for produced films; develop and pitch their own story ideas; and plan, write, and revise, by the end of the course, a significant screenplay project. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN285 Beginning Creative Nonfiction Writing

Practice writing nonfiction prose with literary, artistic intention. Typical uses include personal essays, biographical profiles, and prose essays dealing with issues in history, science, nature, travel, and culture which employ the narrative tools commonly used by writers of fiction. May be taken instead of EN 280 Literary Journalism, for credit for the thematic minor in Journalism. (Not offered 2016-17).

.5 to 1 unit

EN286 Topics in Creative Writing:

Practice in writing specific genres, both fiction and non-fiction. Topics may include travel writing, autobiography, nature writing, science fiction, detective fiction, and others.

1 unit — Bryant, Chavez, Goodwin, Hayward

EN288 Writing for Performance

Identifies techniques utilized by writers of performance, ranging from slam poets to monologists to playwrights. Script and poem excerpts as well as video and audio samples will serve as the basis for in-class conversations around craft. Students will embark on a series of short solo and group writing exercises, trying their hand at a myriad of performance writing forms. Selected student work of merit will be presented in a final public staged reading.

1 unit — Goodwin

EN290 The Birth of the American Novel

Origins in the New Republic (Charlotte Temple, Wieland, the Last of the Mohicans, Hope Leslie), 19th-century young adulthood (The Blithedale Romance, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The American). Historical conditions that nurtured or stymied the development of the novel. Practice in close textual reading. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN298 Representing Identities in Contemporary Fiction

As contemporary writers work towards inventing characters that better represent our diverse world in their fiction, they often must wrestle with constructing identity through and against stereotypes, privilege, overt and indirect racism, objectification, and bias. Even the most valiant attempts for racial, gendered, LGBTQ*, and able-bodied inclusion in fiction come with concerns and unintended pitfalls, particularly when writers represent bodies that are radically different than their own. Students will read multiple texts, participate in discussions and research, and write responses, essays, and creative experiments in order to begin a discussion on body and identity representation in contemporary fiction. This literature course focuses on craft writing with a heavy writing component; however, there is no creative writing prerequisite. With an emphasis upon close reading, we will begin with a study of character construction and review trends of body representation in literature starting with the early novel before delving into current and ongoing articles and arguments.

EN301 Reading the Popular

Textual and historical analysis of 'formula fiction' and popular genres such as romances, Westerns, thrillers, detective stories, horror stories, and science fiction, while also examining traditional ways of distinguishing between 'high art' and the popular. Readings from such authors as Harriet Beecher Stowe, H. G. Wells, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Zane Grey, Margaret Mitchell, Raymond Chandler, Ian Fleming, Stephen King, as well as selected critics and theorists. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN302 History of the English Language with Literary Examples

The sounds, grammar and syntax of Old, Middle and Early Modern English, with a study of appropriate literary works from these periods of linguistic development. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN303 Theories of Teaching Writing

Introduces students to the 19th century and 20th century precedents for current practice in writing instruction at the post-secondary level. Examines the historical roots of post-secondary writing instruction and competing epistemologies driving classroom practices and academic and public visions of the writer, writing, and writing instruction.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN305 Advanced Study of a Genre

In-depth examination of a single literary genre or mode (such as pastoral, epistle, romance, horror, tragedy, or satire) within and across a range of historical periods and cultural and national contexts. Includes theoretical and critical readings. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN306 Problems in Literary Theory

Key issues in literary interpretation. Cultural criticism, Marxism, structuralism and deconstruction, feminist theory, ethnic criticism, psychoanalysis, hermeneutics, rhetorical criticism, etc.

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Sawyer

EN307 Practice in Fiction Writing

This course allows students to keep working on fiction projects outside the regular block courses of the major. Schedule determined in conversation with instructor. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: English 283 and consent of instructor.

EN308 Advanced Poetry Workshop

Writing workshop for experienced writers, with focus on issues of craft in poetry.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & English 282.

1 unit — Hilberry

EN309 Advanced Fiction Workshop

Writing workshop for experienced writers, with focus on issues of craft in fiction.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & English 283.

1 unit — Everett, Walsh-Kuitenbrouwer

EN310 Issues in Medieval Literature:

Selected English and/or Continental literature of the period 400-1500, organized around a specific topic or theme.

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Stefanek

EN311 Chaucer's 'Canterbury Tales'

Introduction to Middle English and close reading of selections from The Canterbury Tales

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Evitt

EN312 The Other Chaucer

Introduction to Middle English and close reading of selections from Chaucer's minor poems, including The Book of the Duchess, Troilus and Criseyde, The Legend of Good Women, and Parlement of Fowles. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN313 Dante's 'Divine Comedy'

Intensive study (in translation) of Dante and his intertexts as context for readings and/or further coursework in later English literature (Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Shelley, Joyce, T. S. Eliot, etc.). (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN320 Issues in Renaissance Literature:

Selected literature of the period 1500-1660, organized around a specific topic or theme.

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Stefanek

EN321 Renaissance Poetry

Selected poetry of the period 1500-1660 focusing on a single poet (such as Donne or Spenser), a group of poets (such as Donne and the Metaphysicals or Ben Jonson and the Tribe of Ben), or a particular genre of poetry (such as narrative verse, the lyric, pastoral poetry, the sonnet sequence, or satire.) (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN326 Studies in Shakespeare:

Detailed study of one of the following groups: 1) histories, 2) comedies and romances, 3) major tragedies, 4) a number of the works grouped according to a thematic principle.

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Love, Simons, Stefanek

EN328 Renaissance Drama

Tragedies, comedies, and tragi-comedies by Shakespeare's contemporaries. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN329 Milton

Major poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with particular emphasis on Paradise Lost. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN350 Issues in Literature of the Long 18th Century:

Selected British (and occasionally some American) literature of the period 1660-1830, organized around a specific topic or theme. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN352 18th-Century British Novel

Examines the origins of the British novel as literary and cultural form from the late 17th century through the early 19th century. Emphasis on one or several of the following critical issues: the epistolary novel, satire, spiritual narrative, representations of gender, imperialism and colonialism, and narrative theory. Authors may include Haywood, Behn, Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, Burney, Smollett, Sterne, Mackenzie, Smith, Edgeworth, and Austen. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN360 Issues in British Romanticism:

Selected literature of the period 1780-1830, organized around a specific Romantic-era topic or theme.

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Richman, Tannenbaum

EN362 British Romantic Fiction

Examines the novel from 1780 to 1830. Authors may include Godwin, Smith, Radcliffe, Lewis, Wollstonecraft, Edgeworth, Austen, Shelley, Hogg, and Scott. (Not offered 2016-17).

1 unit

EN365 British Romantic Poetry

Principal works of selected Romantic-era poets, such as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Smith, Barbauld, Burns, Robinson, Byron, Keats, the Shelleys, Hemans, and Clare, with attention to formal, critical, and historical issues. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN370 Issues in 19th-Century Literature

Selected fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose which looks at a problem or theme in 19th-century British and/or American literature such as narratives of identity, archetypes of city and nature, the politics of genre, comparisons of British and American culture, and the nature of literary periods themselves.

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Garcia

EN371 19th Century British Poetry

Selected works by poets writing after 1830, such as Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, the Rossettis, Hopkins, with attention to formal and historical issues. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

.5 to 1 unit

EN372 19th-Century British Novel

The novel in Britain 1815-1914, with emphasis on such authors as Thackeray, the Brontes, Dickens, George Eliot, Trollope, Hardy, and Conrad. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN379 Irish Literature

Study of Irish writing through a range of writers such as Swift, Edgeworth, Joyce, Yeats, O'Brien and Heaney. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN380 Advanced Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies

Studies in a wide array of topics in American and British literature and media.

Prerequisite: English 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Garcia, Mason, Pulley, Roybal

EN381 Major Authors:

In-depth study of one major author, either contemporary or from an earlier period.

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Minervini, Sarchett

EN382 Studies in 20th-Century Fiction

Selected fiction exploring some aspect of the century's literary and cultural concerns or some particular literary movement. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN383 Studies in 20th-Century Poetry:

Selected poetry exploring some aspect of the century's literary and cultural concerns or some particular poetic movement.

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Mason

EN385 20th-Century African-American Literature

Readings in black American writers such as. W. E. B. Dubois, Ralph Ellison, Nella Larsen, and Rita Dove. Organized around aesthetic and cultural issues such as feminism, the 'anxiety of influence,' pressures of the marketplace, identity politics, and post-modern theory.

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Garcia

EN386 James Joyce's 'Ulysses'

A concentrated study of Joyce's masterpiece, using extensive historical, biographical, critical, and theoretical materials.

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Mason, Simons

EN387 African-American Women Writers and Literary Tradition

Three centuries of texts by African-American women who have conspired with, rebelled against, and created literary traditions, such as Zora Neale Hurston, Pauline Hopkins, Rita Dove, Andrea Lee, and Nella Larsen. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN388 Writing for Performance 2

Advanced Students will envision and execute two performance writing projects: one of their own design, and the other an assignment provided by the professor, tailored to their sensibility. Projects range from one act plays to a series of slam poems to a stand up comedy routine, etc. In-class readings, performances, peer critique, and revision assignments will push us toward a culminating final staged reading of selected projects. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: Theatre 217 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN391 Early American Literature

Major and minor works of the colonial period and the early republic by such writers as Edwards, Franklin, Rowlandson, Charles Brockden Brown, Cooper, and Irving. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN394 19th-Century American Literature

Examines major American authors of the 19th century. Authors may include Sedgwick, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, Emerson, Dickinson, Thoreau and Whitman.

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Tynan

EN395 American Literature: American Realism 1870-1914

Major works of such authors as Dickinson, Mark Twain, Henry James, Crane, Robinson, Dreiser, Wharton and Henry Adams. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN397 American Literary Modernism, 1914-45

The rise of Modernist literature in the U.S. in relation to its discontents. Writers may include Eliot, Pound, W.C. Williams, Cather, Toomer, Stein, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hurston, and O’Neill.

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit — Tynan

EN398 Contemporary American Fiction

Major works of such authors as O'Connor, Pynchon, Delillo, Carver, Morrison, Wallace and others. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

EN399 Junior Seminar

Methodological preparation for advanced work in the literature track. Focus on secondary critical texts in the study of a literary topic or period. Required of junior English literature track majors.

Prerequisite: English 221, English 250, junior standing, a declared major in English, and consent of department. May be taken more than once for credit.

1 unit — Richman, Sarchett

EN401 Independent Reading

Prerequisite: 221 or 250 & Jr/Sr English Major & consent of department.

1 unit — Evitt, Hayward

EN480 Senior Seminar: Literature

Advanced study of a topic of literary significance. Required of all senior Literature Track English majors and of all senior Film Track English majors. Students taking this course for 1 unit must complete EN499 as well. Students taking this course for 2 units complete their senior theses within the course.

Prerequisite: English 221 & 250 or consent of instructor.

1 or 2 units — Evitt, Love

EN481 Senior Seminar: Creative Writing Workshop

Advanced study of creative writing, either fiction or poetry, culminating (after the Senior Project block, EN 485) in a creative thesis such as a collection of short stories, a novella or novel, a collection of poems. Required of all senior Creative Writing English majors.

Prerequisite: English 221 and English 250 or consent of Instructor.

1 unit — Hayward, Mason, Walsh-Kuitenbrouwer

EN485 Senior Project: Creative Writing

Advanced study of a creative writing topic chosen by the student, approved by the department, in which the student completes a creative senior project (either fiction or poetry) in a workshop setting. Required of all Creative Writing Track seniors.

Prerequisite: English 221, English 250 and English 481.

1 unit — Hayward, Mason

EN486 Senior Project: Film

Advanced study of film through film-making on a subject chosen by the student, approved by the department, in which the student completes a film in a workshop setting. Required of all Film Track seniors who are making a film. (Not offered 2016-17).

Prerequisite: English 221, English 250, Film Studies 312.

2 units

EN499 Senior Project: Independent Thesis

Advanced study of a topic chosen by the student, approved by the department, with student research and writing directed by an individual faculty member. Required of all senior Regular Track English Majors who have taken a one-unit section of EN 480.

Prerequisite: English 221, English 250, and English 480.

1 unit — Evitt, Garcia, Hayward, Hilberry