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The 2014-15 State of the Rockies Speaker Series

Currently in the planning stages, the 2014-15 Rockies Speaker Series events will be updated as they are finalized. For a preview of what you kind of great talks you might expect to see, check out the line-up for last year's Speaker's Series below!

 


The 2013-14 State of the Rockies Speakers Series:

Large Landscape Conservation in the Rockies:
Exploring New Conservation Paradigms for the 21st Century

As part of the Rockies Project's 2013-14 focus on Large Landscape Conservation, the Project will once again be holding a speakers series on the Colorado College campus throughout the academic year. Our lineup of experts in the conservation field come from diverse backgrounds and professions, and will help to bring a breadth of knowledge to the Project's research and outreach. The events below currently outline our schedule for the Fall of 2013. Please stay tuned for additional speakers to be scheduled for the Spring of 2014 and details regarding our annual State of the Rockies Conference.


Monday, October 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm in Gates Common Room, Palmer Hall, Colorado College

The Emergence of Large Landscape Conservation in an Era of Planetary Thresholds

Dr. Gary Tabor, Director of the Center for Large Landscape Conservation

Dr. Gary Tabor, BSC Cornell, VMD U Penn, MES Yale, is a conservation catalyst. He has championed large landscape conservation efforts throughout the world, notably the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y). His efforts have increased the conservation capacity of the Wildlife Conservation Society, the African Wildlife Foundation, the Wildlife Trust and numerous other conservation organizations. More recently, Gary established and directed the Wilburforce Foundation's Yellowstone to Yukon field office in Montana and in 1999 designed one of the first conservation science grant making programs in western North America. His conservation background includes eight years of international conservation work in East Africa and South America. Trained as a wildlife veterinarian and an ecologist, Gary also co-founded the Consortium for Conservation Medicine, an ecological health collaborative linking ecology, epidemiology, human and veterinary medicine, and public health. During his career, Gary has served as an adviser to six major private foundations and several bilateral and multilateral donor agencies in the area of biodiversity and wildland philanthropy. Gary recently completed his 6 year term on the Board of Governors of the Society for Conservation Biology.

Click here for the CC campus calendar event listing.


Monday, November 11th, 2013 at 7:00pm in Gates Common Room, Palmer Hall, Colorado College

Large Landscape Initiatives and the Future of American Land Conservation

James N. Levitt, Director of the Program on Conservation Innovation at the Harvard Forest, Harvard University, and a Fellow in the Department of Planning and Urban Form at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy

Jim Levitt is the director of the Program on Conservation Innovation at the Harvard Forest, Harvard University, based in Petersham, Massachusetts, USA, and a Fellow in the Department of Planning and Urban Form at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In addition, he has ongoing fellowships at the Harvard Kennedy School and at Highstead, an NGO advancing land conservation in New England. 

Levitt focuses on landmark innovations in the field of land and biodiversity conservation, both present-day and historic, that are characterized by five traits: novelty and creativity in conception, strategic significance, measurable effectiveness, international transferability, and the ability to endure. Such innovations include: the establishment of the first public open space in the English-speaking world in Boston in 1634; the creation of the world's first state and national parks at Yosemite and Yellowstone in 1864 and 1872; the invention of the world's first land trust in Massachusetts in 1891; and the ongoing emergence of landscape-scale conservation initiatives around the globe in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In each of these landmark innovations, key factors for success include: the engagement of highly talented social entrepreneurs; the leveraging of some of the most advanced technologies of the day; and the use of inventive financial and organizational tools.

Jim Levitt has written and edited dozens of articles and three books on land and biodiversity conservation. He has lectured widely on the topic in venues ranging from Santiago, Chile to Beijing, China, and Montreal, Canada. Among his current efforts, Levitt is advising colleagues in Chile on the expansion of private land conservation initiatives and enabling legal frameworks in that nation. He is also engaged in an effort to link land conservation innovators at universities, colleges and independent research institutions around the globe.

 Levitt is a graduate of Yale College and the Yale School of Management (Yale SOM). He was recently named a Donaldson Fellow by Yale SOM for career achievements that “exemplify the mission of the School”. Jim and his wife Jane have three children and live in Belmont, Massachusetts. The family loves to spend part of every summer on their forested land in Maine, most of which is permanently protected with a conservation easement.

Click here for the CC campus calendar event listing.


Monday, December 9th, 2013 at 7:00pm in Gates Common Room, Palmer Hall, Colorado College

Last Stand: Ted Turner’s Quest to Save a Troubled Planet

Todd Wilkinson, Environmental Journalist, Author

Mikhail Gorbachev says that no private citizen in the history of the world has amassed a broader resume as a pathfinding “eco-capitalist-humanitarian” than Ted Turner.  Yes, that Ted Turner, the subject of Todd Wilkinson’s new provocative book about the media mogul-turned-“bison baron” and 21st century green crusader that is now winning critical acclaim.

“Last Stand: Ted Turner’s Quest to Save a Troubled Planet” spans the enigmatic arc of Turner’s other and heretofore largely undocumented life, stretching from Turner’s two million acres of private property, most of it in the West, where he’s amassed a herd of 55,000 bison and manages his properties as “arks” for imperiled species, to his unabashed support of the UN  (with a historic $1 billion gift) and founding of the Nuclear Threat  initiative with Sam Nunn to eradicate nuclear weapons and prevent material from falling into the hands of terrorists. 

Last Stand, praised by Tom Brokaw, E.O. Wilson, David Quammen and Terry Tempest Williams, also delves into deeply personal aspects of Turner’s life that speak to his bold motivation as a plutocrat to give back to society—his troubled relationship with his father and his 10-year marriage to Jane Fonda.  It goes  into aspects of relationships that Turner has not been shared in other books.

Foremost, Ted dismisses the premise that economic prosperity must necessarily come at the expense of the environment. He is considered a model in showing how the triple bottom line really works.

Wilkinson, who today makes his home in Bozeman, Montana, has been an environmental journalist for nearly 30 years.  His work is well known to Westerners.

Click here for the CC campus calendar event listing.


Monday, February 24th, 2014 at 7:00pm in Gates Common Room, Palmer Hall, Colorado College

Spine of the Continent

Mary Ellen Hannibal, Author

As climate change encroaches, animals and plants around the globe are having their habitats pulled out from under them.  At the same time, human development has made islands out of even our largest nature reserves, stranding the biodiversity that lives within them.  The Spine of the Continent introduces readers to the most ambitious conservation effort ever undertaken:  to create linked protected areas extending from the Yukon to Mexico, the entire length of North America.  This movement is the brainchild of Michael Soule, the founder of conservation biology and the peer of E.O. Wilson and Paul Ehrlich, who endorse his effort as necessary to saving nature on our continent.  With blue-ribbon scientific foundations, the Spine is yet a grassroots, cooperative effort among conservation activists – NGOs large and small -- and regular citizens.  The Spine of the Continent is not only about making physical connections so that nature will persist; it is about making connections between people and the land we call home.  In this fascinating, exciting, and important book, Mary Ellen Hannibal travels the length of the Spine, sharing stories and anecdotes about the passionate, idiosyncratic people she meets along the way – and the critters they love.

Mary Ellen Hannibal has written for many publications and environmental non-profits. Hannibal’s other books include Evidence of Evolution, Leaves & Pods, and Good Parenting Through Your Divorce. A former book review and travel editor, Hannibal is Chair of the California Book Awards. She was a 2011 Alicia Patterson Foundation Fellow.  She is a recipient of the National Society of Science Writer’s Science and Society Award 2012 and Stanford University’s Knight-Risser Prize for Western Environmental Journalism.

Click here for the CC campus calendar event listing.


 

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014 at 7:00pm in Celeste South Theater, Cornerstone Arts Building, Colorado College

Large Landscape Conservation in the Rockies:
Exploring New Conservation Paradigms for the 21st Century

A session of the first annual Colorado College Innovation Showcase

Release of the 2014 State of the Rockies Report Card, Premiere of the Rockies Project production Spine of the Continent, and Keynote Talk by Michael Soulé, Conservation Biologist

Please stay tuned to the State of the Rockies' website to learn more about our final event of the year, and Colorado College's Innovation Showcase.