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Rubric

Assessment: Rubric for Assessing Explanations of “The West” or the Western World (first outcome)

  • Learning Outcome: Explain one or more meanings of “the West” or the western world in relation to the particular topic or area under study
  Unsatisfactory Satisfactory 

Outstanding 

Quality of explanation Meanings of “the West” or the western world are not explained or the explanation indicates that the student has not grasped the meanings considered in the course

Meanings of “the West” or the western world are explained in an insightful and clear way

 
Meanings of “the West” or the western world are explained in an extraordinarily insightful way that sheds new light on how to think about “the West” today 
Relationship to topic/area of study Meanings of “the West” or the western world are not explained in the context of the topic or area under study, or the topic or area under study is discussed in a way that indicates that the student has not grasped its connection to “the West”  Meanings of “the West” or the western world are explained in a way that shows clearly how the topic or area under study interacts with, influences, or is influenced by, those meanings The connection between meanings of “the West” or the western world and the topic or area under study is made both clearly and with exceptional insight about the interaction between the two 

Assessment: Rubric for Assessing Construction of a Narrative of the West (second outcome)

  • Learning Outcome: Construct a narrative of the West relevant to the course, identifying at least two major periods or epochs, characterizing their central themes and chronological places in that narrative
  Unsatisfactory Satisfactory

Outstanding 

Selection of periods/epochs 

Epochs selected are not appropriate to course, are poor choices,  or do not provide any insight in understanding the Western tradition in the course’s context Epochs selected are appropriate to course; epochs selected are important for understanding Western tradition in course’s context; epochs selected represent a good choice among epochs covered in course Epochs selected are excellent ones for providing new insights about the Western tradition in the course’s context

Construction of chronological narrative

The narrative is mistaken about the chronology the course examined, is poorly constructed, or is shallow. The narrative is accurate about chronology, weaves together events or topics raised in the course adequately, and focuses on key moments in the chronology, as appropriate to the course materials. Narrative draws skillfully on course material to provide fresh insight into how to make sense of the West in a chronological sequence.
Characterization of epochal themes Themes are poorly selected and characterized without insight into how they fit into narrative; if comparison of themes is provided, it is done sloppily or without insight 

Themes selected are appropriate to course; characterization is accurate; if comparison of themes is provided, it is done clearly and with some insight 

Themes selected are insightful; characterization is superb; if comparison of themes is provided, it is done in ways that shed new light on how the narrative of the West developed in light of course’s context  

Assessment: Rubric for Assessing Identification of Critical Self-Examination in Western Narratives (third outcome)

  • Learning Outcome: Identify at least two forms of critical self-examination in western narratives
    Unsatisfactory   Satisfactory Outstanding 

Identification of critical self-examination 

Fewer than two forms of critical self-examination in western narratives have been accurately identified

At least two forms of critical self-examination in western narratives have been accurately identified

At least two forms of critical self-examination in western narratives have been accurately identified, and those forms are among the most important covered in the course
Description of critical self-examination (optional for faculty) Critical self-examination is described inaccurately or carelessly, or both inaccurately and carelessly Critical self-examination is described in some depth

Critical self-examination is described in depth and implications for western narratives demonstrate insight and thoughtfulness 


Assessment: Learning Outcome and Rubric for explaining how at least two contemporary institutions, beliefs, practices, or modes of thought and experience may be understood against their historical background (fourth outcome)

  Unsatisfactory   Satisfactory   Outstanding
Selection of contemporary institutions, beliefs, practices, or modes of thought

Fewer than two contemporary institutions, beliefs, practices, or modes of thought have been selected; the selection does not make sense in light of course context or the student is unclear about the nature of the institutions, beliefs, practices, or modes of thought as relevant to the assignment

At least two contemporary institutions, beliefs, practices, or modes of thought have been selected; the selection makes sense in light of the historical dimension of the course

At least two contemporary institutions, beliefs, practices, or modes of thought have been selected; discussion of the selection sheds new light on how the historical background discussed in the course has shaped the items selected.