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Faculty Personnel Policies & Financial Matters

I. The Colorado College Faculty 

II. The Faculty’s Role and Responsibilities 

A. Teaching and Academic Advising 

B. Scholarship 

C. College Service and Participation in College Life 

III. Faculty Tenure and Academic Freedom 

A. Faculty Tenure 

B. Academic Freedom  

IV. Recruitment Procedures and Hiring Policies for Tenure-Track Faculty

A. Recruitment Procedures 

B. Equal Opportunity and Special Opportunity Hiring 

C. Split-Position Hiring 

1. Terms of employment 

2. Evaluation reviews 

3. Benefits 

4. Reassessment of the Split Position  

V. Initial Appointment and Reappointment for Tenure-Track Faculty 

VI. The Third-year Review 

VII. The Tenure Decision 

A. Criteria for Tenure 

1. Teaching 

2. Scholarship 

3. Service to the College community

B. Tenure Procedures 

C. The Tenure File 

D. The Right of Appeal  

VIII. Promotion Reviews for Tenure-Track Faculty 

A. Promotion to Associate Professor 

B. Promotion to Full Professor 

C. Procedures for Promotion of Department Chairs to Full Professor

IX. Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Appointments 

A. Adjunct Faculty 

1. Appointment and review 

2. Responsibilities and privileges 

3. Salary and benefits 

4. Change of status 

B. Riley Scholars-in-Residence 

C. Block Visitors 

D. Full-time Faculty Replacements 

E. Lecturer Reviews

F. Appointment Letters for Non-Tenure-Track Faculty 

X. Faculty Compensation and Benefits 

A. Salary 

1. Determination of faculty salaries 

2. Payment of faculty salaries 

3. Deductions from faculty salaries 

B. Non-Salary Employment Benefits 

C. Educational Assistance Benefits 

D. Support for Faculty Scholarship and Research 

E. Life Insurance Benefit 

XI. Employment Outside the College 

XII. Faculty Leaves 

A. Sabbatical Leaves 

1. Purpose 

2. Eligibility and requirements  

B. Appointments to Positions with Associated Colleges of the Midwest 

C. Unpaid Non-Medical Leaves 

D. Medical Leaves 

1. Paid medical leaves 

2. Unpaid medical leaves  

E. Parental Leave 

F. Replacements for Faculty Members on Leave 

G. Salary and Benefits during Leaves 

XIII. Termination of Employment 

A. Resignation 

B. Retirement 

C. Early Retirement 

1. Eligibility and approval 

2. Full Early Retirement compensation and benefits 

3. Phased Early Retirement responsibilities and benefits 

4. Review of the Early Retirement program

D. Dismissal and Procedures for Appeal 

1. Dismissal prior to the tenure decision 

2. Denial of tenure 

3. Dismissal of tenured faculty 

4. Notice of termination 

XIV. Discipline Other Than Dismissal

I. THE COLORADO COLLEGE FACULTY

The faculty of the College consists of all Professors, Associate Professors, Assistant Professors and Instructors in the tenure-track, adjunct, visiting, lecturer, and Phased Early Retirement categories. In consultation with the Dean and the Faculty Executive Committee, the President of the College makes the final decision regarding the creation, renewal, or restoration of all tenure- track and adjunct faculty positions.

II. THE FACULTY’S ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The role of a member of the Colorado College faculty consists of teaching and advising, scholarship, and service to the College community. In fulfilling the duties required by their appointment, faculty members are expected to practice intellectual honesty, maintain ethical integrity in academic research and personal conduct, respect cultural diversity and alternative critical viewpoints, and comport themselves in a professional and collegial manner.

A. Teaching and Academic Advising

Effective teaching is an art, a science, and a craft. The skills necessary for good teaching continue to develop over years of practice. They include the ability to convey essential information in a lively way; engage students in productive discussion; improve students’ abilities to read, write, speak, and think; provide opportunities for students to conduct independent research; introduce novel fields of investigation; and develop new methods of pedagogy. The exercise of these skills results in a wide range of teaching styles, but the results can be demonstrated in quality of course preparation and evidence of student learning.

B. Scholarship

Informed teaching requires sustained attention to current research in relevant disciplines and areas of inquiry, as demonstrated in scholarly publication, performance, and conference presentations. Each faculty member is expected to engage actively in research and to present the results regularly in professional venues.

C. College Service and Participation in College Life

Faculty members serve the College community in many ways. They may serve on committees; assist with departmental activities; advise student organizations; participate in interdisciplinary programs; engage in artistic performances or academic presentations on campus; and represent the College in the wider community, in academic professional societies, and on committees of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest.

Faculty members are expected to attend the Fall Conference that marks the formal opening of the academic year and to participate in specified activities of New Student Orientation. They are also expected to be present at those occasions that call for academic processions: Fall Convocation, Honors Convocation, Baccalaureate, and Commencement.

III. FACULTY TENURE AND ACADEMIC FREEDOM

A. Faculty Tenure

Colorado College recognizes the practice of awarding tenure as an essential means of ensuring the integrity of the whole educational enterprise. Tenure’s most important function is to protect academic freedom from both overt threats and subtle encroachments. Tenure also guarantees a sufficient degree of economic security to make college teaching an appealing career choice. Once a faculty member has received tenure, his or her employment by Colorado College can be terminated only because of financial exigency of the College or by the faculty member’s retirement, voluntary resignation, or involuntary dismissal for cause (as explained in PART TWO, XIII. of this Handbook).

B. Academic Freedom

Colorado College is an institution of higher learning dedicated to the unrestricted search for knowledge. In pursuit of this goal, the College affirms the freedom of faculty members to express controversial views based on their scholarly work without fear of institutional censure. Faculty members are at liberty to present unpopular or contested viewpoints, to explore sensitive topics of inquiry in their classes, and to conduct research in any area of investigation relevant to their teaching. We believe that the pursuit of knowledge is best served when critical thought is unrestrained by ideological limits imposed from without and when research and analysis proceed with a robust confidence that conclusions may be stated honestly and publicly without qualification, however contrary to conventional wisdom or established authority those conclusions may be. A faculty member should nevertheless make clear that she or he expresses personal views and does not speak or write on behalf of the faculty or the College.

As a matter of professional integrity, the College expects faculty members to submit their work on a regular basis to rigorous peer review and to refrain from conducting research using College resources for monetary gain, unless given prior institutional approval.

In the interest of maintaining an open and tolerant campus climate, the College expects faculty members to refrain from using the authority inherent in their institutional role to coerce others into accepting their conclusions to controversial questions. The College further expects faculty members to take care that their language does not discriminate against others or constitute harassment of members of the College community, to respect alternative viewpoints expressed by students and colleagues, and to maintain standards of accuracy and honesty in teaching and research. Academic freedom guarantees that all members of our community may engage in rigorous intellectual inquiry without fear of recrimination. Academic freedom protects faculty members from unwarranted intrusion on their right to free speech, but also obligates them to respect those who disagree with them.

IV. RECRUITMENT PROCEDURES AND HIRING POLICIES FOR TENURE-TRACK FACULTY

A. Recruitment Procedures

Colorado College has long sought to provide a curriculum that represents the best of traditional and contemporary scholarship. The College is also committed to hiring faculty members who can bring a variety of cultural, ethnic, and gender perspectives to their teaching. The College pursues this goal by means of recruitment practices designed to identify and attract qualified persons of diverse identities into the pool of applicants for each open faculty position. In its final selection the College chooses the best qualified candidate.

Recruitment for a new faculty member begins with an announcement of the available position that is nationwide in scope. The chair of the search committee (usually the department or program chair) advertises the position in venues suitable to relevant academic disciplines, including placement services of appropriate professional societies. The chair may also notify directors of graduate programs and may seek further advice from the department’s library liaison about other advertising options such as Web sites and professional publications. The advertisement of the position must include language that affirms the College’s commitment to a diverse faculty, and it must be approved by the chairs of the Minority Concerns Committee and the Women’s Concerns Committee, and the Dean. Applicants are required to submit a personal statement, a curriculum vitae, academic transcripts, and letters of recommendation.

A search committee normally consists of members of the hiring department plus two non- departmental faculty members. If a departmental member is being replaced, he or she does not serve on the search committee. If a department has fewer than four members, it may augment its departmental membership with faculty from other departments. After consulting with the hiring department, the Women’s Concerns Committee, and the Divisional Executive Committee, the Dean appoints one committee member from a cognate discipline. The Minority Concerns Committee appoints the other non-departmental member. All members of the Committee participate in every phase of the hiring process.

After an initial screening of the written applications, the search committee may arrange for preliminary interviews at professional meetings or by telephone in order to identify the most promising candidates. The Dean and the department chair decide how many candidates to bring to campus for meetings with members of the department, the appropriate Divisional Executive Committee, other faculty members (including representatives from the Women’s Concerns and Minority Concerns Committees), interested students, the Dean, and the President. During her or his campus visit each candidate participates in a public discussion or presents a paper in a session open to the College community. After the on-campus visits, the chair solicits comments from persons who met with the candidates, facilitates search committee discussions, and either notifies the Dean of the committee’s vote to offer the position to a candidate or requests that additional candidates be brought to campus. Upon receiving a positive hiring recommendation from the search committee, the Dean informs the President of his or her recommendation. In the event of a positive decision by the President, the Dean may authorize the department chair to inform the successful candidate and ascertain whether the College’s proposed offer of employment is acceptable. The Dean then makes an offer of appointment on behalf of the College. When an offer has been accepted, the President or the Dean sends the candidate a letter of appointment. Only the letter of appointment may be relied on for the terms of a faculty member’s employment by the College.

Copies of all documents included in the recruitment process must be kept on file for a period of twelve months after a faculty position is filled.

B. Equal Opportunity and Special Opportunity Hiring

Colorado College is committed to equal opportunity in all its hiring practices. The Dean is the College’s Equal Opportunity Officer in matters of faculty recruitment, but department chairs are primarily responsible for ensuring equal opportunity at each stage of the recruitment process. This responsibility includes maintaining contact with a diverse group of scholars who might know about minority candidates, informing directors of graduate programs about positions to be filled, and identifying applicants whose inclusion would increase the diversity of the applicant pool. If the Dean determines that more time is needed to identify a more diverse applicant pool, the Dean may allow a department to postpone fulfilling a position for a year. In occasional memoranda the Dean may recommend particular means of implementing the College’s equal opportunity policy most effectively.

In unusual circumstances the College may take advantage of special opportunities to bring to the faculty persons of extraordinary ability and exceptional promise. Special opportunity hires do not require a national search. Before making such an appointment, however, the Dean consults with the appropriate department and Divisional Executive Committee, the Faculty Executive Committee, the Minority Concerns Committee, and the Women’s Concerns Committee in order to determine whether, in their view, the appointment would be in the spirit of the College’s commitment to equal opportunity in recruitment.

C. Split-Position Hiring

Departments and programs will normally hire a single person to fill a faculty vacancy, but at their discretion and with the approval of the Dean they may also make split-position hires. The position may be divided only within a single program or department, never between departments or programs. Candidates must indicate their intention to be considered for a split position when they submit their letter (or letters) of application.

1. Terms of Employment

Teaching and advising responsibilities are normally divided equally; but to accommodate changing needs of the two faculty members, this ratio may change from year to year with departmental or program approval. In the year that the tenure files are being established, however, the teaching ratio must be 50/50. Co-teaching will be allowed only at the discretion of the hiring department and with the approval of the Dean. Should persons hired for a split position request teaching Blocks beyond their normal teaching load during the eight-Block academic year, the hiring department may give their request preferential treatment. Salary for an additional Block will be the same as for Block visitors.

Both persons will be assigned a single office and, in the natural sciences, a single lab. The hiring department is responsible for negotiating any additional facilities or equipment.

Each person has one vote in regular or special meetings of the Colorado College faculty. Both persons may serve on appointive and elective College committees, and both will fulfill the normal College responsibilities expected of all members of the faculty. Either person may chair a department, but both persons may not chair a department together nor may one serve as an associate chair if the other is the department chair.

Persons hired for a split position may choose to have a third-year review and a sixth-year tenure decision, or they may choose a fourth-year review and a tenure decision in the eighth year. A switch from the three/six track to the four/eight track may be made in the third year, but no change from the four/eight track to the three/six track is allowed.

2. Evaluation reviews

Each person is, individually, the candidate for the third-year (or fourth-year) review and reviews for tenure, promotion, and salary raises.

Requirements for tenure and promotion will not be relaxed for either member of a split position. Each person must meet the expectations for teaching, scholarship and College service described in this Handbook.

3. Benefits 

Although a split position is considered a single-benefit position for most purposes, each person contributes separately to those mandatory benefit programs of the College which entail costs to faculty members. Long-term disability insurance premiums and contributions to the Defined Contribution Retirement Plan are based on salary, whereas contributions to Emeriti Retirement Health Solutions are fixed dollar amounts. For voluntary benefit programs that are funded jointly by the College and the faculty member, one member of a split-position pair is considered the employee and the other person, his or her dependent.

4. Reassessment of the Split Position

In any of the following situations, the hiring department or program will need to reassess the advisability of continuing a split position and forward its decision to the Dean: (1) one person is granted tenure, but the other is not; (2) one person leaves the College for other employment; (3) the two faculty members dissolve their working relationship or one of the two dies or becomes incapacitated.

V. INITIAL APPOINTMENT AND REAPPOINTMENT FOR TENURE-TRACK FACULTY

All initial faculty appointments, and any subsequent reappointments, are made by the President or the Dean after consultation with the department or program chair. Only the initial appointment letter may be relied upon for the terms and conditions of employment. Prior to the award of tenure, the appointments of tenure-track faculty are renewed each year, and neither reappointment nor tenure is automatic or assured.

Colorado College ordinarily hires at the Assistant Professor rank persons who have completed the Ph.D. or other terminal degree or who give promise of completing the degree by the beginning of the academic year in which teaching responsibilities commence. If degree requirements are not met before the academic year begins, the new faculty member’s rank is reduced from Assistant Professor to Instructor, and salary is adjusted accordingly. If degree requirements are completed by December 31, the Instructor becomes an Assistant Professor on January 1. If degree requirements are completed between January 1 and August 31, the Instructor becomes an Assistant Professor on September 1 of the academic year following his or her initial appointment. Until requirements for the Ph.D. (or other terminal degree) are completed, a faculty member remains in the Instructor rank. After three years as an Instructor a person must either be promoted to Assistant Professor or given a terminal contract for a fourth year. Renewal of a tenure-track appointment for the fourth year is contingent upon completion of the Ph.D. or other terminal degree by June 30 of the third year.

Under special circumstances, new faculty members with prior teaching or post-doctoral experience may be credited with time towards the tenure and promotion review. A portion of the years spent in the Instructor rank may be counted if the Dean and the candidate agree to this at the time of the initial appointment to Assistant Professor. The Dean explains any such exceptional arrangements in a memorandum that becomes part of the candidate’s third-year review and tenure files.

VI. THE THIRD-YEAR REVIEW

During a faculty member’s third full year at Colorado College (or at a different time specified in the faculty member’s initial letter of appointment), the College conducts a review of his or her effectiveness as a teacher, scholar, and member of the College community. The purpose of this review is diagnostic: to identify areas of relative weakness as well as strengths and to suggest ways to improve prior to the tenure review.

Persons responsible for the third-year review are the faculty member’s department (or program) chair, the appropriate Divisional Executive Committee, the Personnel Subcommittee of the Faculty Executive Committee, the full FEC, and the Dean. The review process remains confidential throughout. At the end of the review, the Dean and the department chair meet with the faculty member to summarize its results. The Dean sends a written version of the review summary to the candidate and the department chair. The department chair retains a copy of the summary to include in the faculty member’s tenure file.

Criteria of assessment in the third-year review are the same as those for the tenure review. The composition of the third-year review file is basically the same as the tenure file. (See VII.C. of this Handbook.)

If the chair of the review candidate’s department (or program) is untenured or Adjunct, the Dean will designate a tenured faculty member to conduct the third-year review on the chair’s behalf.

A negative third-year review may result in a terminal contract for the fourth year. On the other hand, a positive third-year review does not guarantee a positive tenure decision.

VII. THE TENURE DECISION

The award of tenure attests to the College’s judgment that a faculty member has demonstrated a level of ability and achievement as both teacher and scholar that is consistent with the professional standards of the nation’s premier liberal arts colleges. The award of tenure expresses as well the College’s confidence that the faculty member will contribute significantly to the intellectual and collegial life of the College over an extended professional career.

A. Criteria for Tenure

Institutional considerations such as budgetary constraints, changes in programs and course offerings, and appropriate balance among academic departments may play a role in tenure decisions, but the principal criteria are the quality of a faculty member’s teaching, scholarship, and service to the Colorado College community. The evaluation will include all work completed or in progress since the time of appointment. The candidate for tenure must give evidence of continuing achievement in these areas.

1. Teaching

Students’ learning and the development of students’ intellectual and creative potential are the chief goals of a Colorado College education. Accordingly, the College gives highest priority to excellence in teaching as a requirement for tenure. Although the balance among teaching, scholarship, and service to one’s department and the College may vary at different stages of a faculty member’s career, teaching is always paramount. Colleagues involved in the tenure review process will therefore look for compelling evidence that a candidate for tenure has demonstrated the ability to engage students in active learning and convey ideas and information effectively. Students and alumni will be asked to evaluate the candidate by responding to questions such as these: Did the professor use class time effectively? Were the purposes and structure of the course clear, and did course assignments contribute in obvious ways to the aims of the course? Was the professor able to provoke inquiry and stimulate creative thinking? Did the professor provide helpful evaluation of your work? Because Colorado College wishes to reward faculty members who set high academic standards for their students, persons involved in the tenure process will be careful not to confuse teaching excellence with popularity.

2. Scholarship

Because the vitality and competence of College teachers depend upon their participation in the life of scholarship, candidates for tenure will be expected to demonstrate that they are knowledgeable about recent developments in their particular area of expertise. A body of scholarly work—in the form of peer-reviewed publication, performance, or exhibit—will provide evidence of the quality of a faculty member’s own contributions to the repository of knowledge in his or her field. This scholarly work can reflect the development of the faculty member’s research in new directions, or it can build on or extend previous work. This work will be judged by qualified Colorado College colleagues and by professional peers outside the College. Because scholarship varies in different disciplines, departments or programs provide a statement of the kind and quality of scholarly work required for tenure. Reviewers consult these statements in preparing their assessments.

While work in progress, professional activities, supervision of student research, and peer- reviewed conference papers or presentations will be considered components of a body of scholarly work and positive contributions to a tenure file, they will not compensate for a lack of peer-reviewed publication (or the equivalent in the visual and performance arts); nor will teaching or service to the community compensate for a dearth of scholarly productivity.

3. Service to the College community

Members of the Colorado College faculty are dedicated scholar-teachers, committed to their own scholarly work and to the learning experience of students in their courses; but they are also expected to be engaged in the broader life of the College. Without such engagement, Colorado College would be merely a collection of individuals rather than a community of learning. Evidence of a tenure candidate’s contribution to the life of the College community may include advising students, assuming departmental responsibilities, serving on College committees, taking leadership roles in interdisciplinary programs, participating in alumni and admissions activities, and assisting in special projects. More important than the number of such activities is the impact that a faculty member has on the intellectual, artistic, and collegial life of the College by virtue of his or her character and presence. Although a faculty member’s contributions to professional organizations and to the wider community are valued, they cannot substitute for service to Colorado College.

B. Tenure Procedures

In a faculty member’s sixth year at Colorado College in one of the professorial grades, or at some other time specified in the initial letter of appointment, the College decides whether to award tenure or issue a terminal contract for the following academic year. In unusual circumstances, and upon the faculty member’s written request, the President may extend the probationary period beyond the sixth year.

For the purpose of discussing the tenure process, the Dean meets with candidates and their department chairs at the beginning of the candidate’s third-year review and in the spring of the academic year preceding the tenure review. Items for discussion at these meetings will include the criteria for tenure; tenure procedures and timetables; any aspects of the process peculiar to the particular department or program; and any unusual feature of the candidate’s original appointment letter. Candidates unable to attend a general information meeting may request to meet with the Dean and their department chair to discuss the information. The Dean’s summaries of these meetings become a part of the tenure candidate’s file.

The chair appoints three tenured colleagues, including at least one from outside the department, to visit the candidate’s classes during the eight Blocks prior to the submission of the file and to discuss the visit with the candidate. The chair includes reports of these visits in the tenure file.

In May of the academic year preceding the tenure review, the department chair requests assessments of the candidate’s scholarly or creative work from four scholars at other liberal arts colleges, research universities or institutions or from other professionals who are qualified to judge the candidate’s scholarly work, three of whom hold a higher faculty rank than that of the candidate. Letters requesting their assistance will explain the College’s expectations for teaching, work with students, and service and will ask them to evaluate the quality of the candidate’s scholarship. The chair, in consultation with the Dean, selects two of these external evaluators. The candidate selects the other two and provides the chair a brief written explanation of their qualifications to serve as evaluators. If the Dean or the chair has reservations about these choices or suspects that recommendations from these persons could weaken the tenure file, he or she so informs the candidate in writing, but neither the chair nor the Dean may reject an evaluator whom the candidate chooses to retain.

By early September the department or program chair (or an assigned surrogate) begins to assemble a review file that includes all work completed or in progress since the time of appointment. The chair requests from the candidate a curriculum vitae, evidence of continuing scholarly achievement, evidence of teaching excellence since the third-year review, statements of teaching philosophy and research goals, and a description of contributions to the life of the College and to the candidate’s professional discipline.

The chair sends a letter requesting evaluation of the candidate to all students and alumni taught by the candidate since the third-year review and to the candidate’s academic advisees. The candidate may also suggest names of students who are acquainted with the candidate because of a mentoring relationship, a shared research project, or joint service on a College committee. Alternatively, the chair may request that the Dean’s Office contact students and alumni. In either case, the Dean’s Office prepares the letter that is sent. It is the responsibility of the chair to ensure that the tenure file contains at least twenty-five student and alumni evaluations, even if he or she must interview students in order to attain this level of response. The chair includes in the tenure file a summary of information about the candidate’s teaching that is available in course evaluations since the third-year review.

In early fall the chair solicits written assessments of the candidate from Colorado College colleagues outside the candidate’s department or program. These persons may be faculty or other members of the College community who are familiar with the candidate’s teaching, scholarship, committee service, or other contributions to the College. The evaluations of persons who have co-taught with the candidate or who have chaired a committee on which the candidate served are particularly helpful. In early fall the relevant Divisional Executive Committee also requests members of the faculty who are familiar with the candidate’s scholarship or contributions to the College to send letters of evaluation to the department chair.

During the fall semester the chair invites tenured members of the candidate’s department or program to read the tenure file and write letters detailing their evaluation of the candidate. For candidates whose letter of appointment specifies responsibility for teaching in an inter- disciplinary program or who devote substantial time and energy to an ID program, the program’s director or steering committee chair may develop a supplementary file containing letters of colleagues from the ID program, letters from external reviewers of the candidate’s scholarship in the ID field, and any other material necessary for a thorough review. In some cases it may be sufficient for the director of the ID program to submit a letter regarding the candidate’s contributions to the program for the tenure file. The appropriate course of action will be agreed upon by the Dean, the candidate, the department chair, and the program director or steering committee chair. The file available for review by tenured members of the department or program will, however, not include letters from other faculty and staff colleagues or the supplementary file. Non-tenured members of the department or program may write letters of evaluation as well, but the tenure file is not accessible to them.

On the basis of a careful review of the complete tenure file and consultation with members of the candidate’s department or program, the chair composes a letter that summarizes the file, conveys the department’s assessment of the candidate, and makes his or her own recommendation for or against tenure. Having added his or her letter to the tenure file, the chair informs the Dean, the Divisional Executive Committee, and the Faculty Executive Committee that the file is now ready for committee review. The tenure file is kept in the Dean’s Office, and after the chair’s letter has been included, neither the chair nor the candidate may add any new material to the file at subsequent stages of the review. No member of the candidate’s department may be involved in the tenure process beyond the departmental level, and no one may participate at any level if her or his participation is compromised by conflict of interest.

The Divisional Executive Committee reviews the tenure file, including the department chair’s letter. When the Committee has made its decision, its written recommendation becomes a part of the tenure file.

The Personnel Subcommittee of the Faculty Executive Committee then carefully evaluates the entire file and presents its case for or against tenure to the full FEC, whose members have also reviewed the file. After discussing the candidate’s file and the recommendation of the Personnel Subcommittee, members of the FEC vote to award or deny tenure, and the outcome of the vote is recorded in the minutes of the FEC. The chair of the FEC adds to the tenure file the recommendation of the Personnel Subcommittee, as approved or modified by the full FEC, and the outcome of the tenure vote. The Dean and the President are normally present at these discussions. If they require further information, the Dean and the President, as well as the Faculty Executive Committee, may choose to speak with the candidate. The candidate may also request such a conference.

Taking into account her or his own reading of the tenure file, the case made by the Personnel Subcommittee, and the discussion and vote of the Faculty Executive Committee and its final statement of recommendation, the Dean forwards his or her written recommendation to the President and orally informs the candidate as well. The Dean adds her or his recommendation to the tenure file. At that time, the Dean provides the candidate with a written summary of the file and rationale for the recommendation.

In the case of a Dean’s positive recommendation, the President makes his or her recommendation to the Board of Trustees for action at its next regularly scheduled meeting.
If the Dean’s tenure recommendation is negative, he or she so informs the department chair, the Divisional Executive Committee, and the Faculty Executive Committee as well as the candidate. If a candidate chooses to appeal a Dean’s negative recommendation, the President delays his or her recommendation to the Board of Trustees until the appeal process (described in XIII.D. in this Handbook) is complete.

When the candidate for tenure is a department chair, the Dean designates another member of the faculty to conduct the tenure review on the department’s behalf, but the tenure review otherwise proceeds as outlined above.

C. The Tenure File

The file that serves as the evidentiary basis for the award or denial of tenure will contain a variety of items provided by the candidate and by other participants in the tenure process. The department or program chair is responsible for ensuring the confidentiality of the file until it is submitted to the Dean; the confidentiality of the file is thereafter the responsibility of the Dean’s Office.

1. The candidate for tenure submits to the chair of the department or program the following items:

a current curriculum vitae; evidence of teaching excellence and scholarly achievement appropriate to the candidate’s field of academic expertise; statements of teaching philosophy and research goals; and a description of contributions to the life of the College. He or she may also include representative examples of course syllabi, assignments, and exams.

2. The chair is responsible for ensuring that these items are included in the tenure file:

 

  1. the Dean's summaries of the third and fifth year meetings with the candidate for the purpose of discussing the tenure process and criteria.
     
  2. the Dean's summary of the results of the candidate's third-year review.
     
  3. a minimum of twenty-five letters of evaluation from students and alumni (these letters to include names of courses and approximate dates of interaction with the candidate).
     
  4. letters from all tenured members of the candidate's department, and letters from untenured department members who choose to write.
     
  5. letters from other members of the Colorado College community.
     
  6. letters from four scholars from other liberal arts colleges, research universities or institutions or from other professionals who are qualified to judge the candidate's scholarly work.
     
  7. reports of class visits from Colorado College colleagues (with indication of when a class visit was made).
     
  8. a letter in which the chair presents the department's assessment of the candidate and give her or his own recommendation for or against the award of tenure.
     
  9. a statement from the chair that explains how he or she compiled the candidate's file, with copies of letters sent to students, alumni, faculty, and external reviewers.
     
  10. a statement from the chair summarizing and contextualizing course evaluations.

 

3. On the basis of its independent review of the tenure file, the Divisional Executive Committee adds its recommendation.

4. The recommendation of the Personnel Subcommittee of the Faculty Executive Committee, as approved or amended by the full FEC (and including the outcome of its vote), is the final item added to the tenure file before its review by the Dean and the President.

(Items referred to in Section C. are further described in the previous Section.) 

D. The Right of Appeal

Any faculty member has the right to appeal a negative tenure decision according to the procedure described below in section XIII.D.

VIII. PROMOTION REVIEWS FOR TENURE-TRACK FACULTY

A. Promotion to Associate Professor

Under normal circumstances, Colorado College evaluates faculty members for tenure and for promotion from Assistant Professor to Associate Professor at the same time and by means of the same review process, a candidate’s tenure file thus serving also as a promotion file. The final tenure and promotion decisions are nevertheless independent of each other, and a positive tenure decision does not necessarily ensure a positive promotion decision.

An Assistant Professor may be considered for promotion to Associate Professor prior to the tenure review only if the initial letter of appointment stipulates that possibility.

B. Promotion to Full Professor

Persons promoted to the rank of Full Professor at Colorado College have attained a level of achievement that fulfills their earlier promise. They have earned widespread respect for their teaching effectiveness and their consistent commitment to student learning. Several peer- reviewed publications (or equivalent performances or exhibits) since tenure review now testify to their scholarly reputation. In addition, they have made significant contributions to the life of the College—for example, by chairing a department or program, by demonstrating leadership on faculty committees or special College projects, by mentoring new faculty, or by co-teaching in interdisciplinary courses. Recognition for leadership in the wider community or in a professional society can further strengthen a case for promotion to Full Professor.

Established teacher-scholars occasionally join the Colorado College faculty at the rank of Full Professor, but faculty members are normally considered for promotion to Full Professor in or after the eighth year in the Associate Professor rank. An Associate Professor has the right to request his or her department chair to conduct an early review (prior to eight years in rank) for promotion to Full Professor, but early reviews are unusual and the Dean may offer counsel about the advisability of such a request.

The review procedures for promotion to Full Professor are generally the same as those for the tenure review. The promotion file closely resembles the tenure file but focuses on the candidate’s performance since the earlier file was assembled, attending particularly to areas of strength or weakness that were previously identified.

An Associate Professor whose department decides not to recommend him or her for either normal or early promotion to Full Professor may ask to meet with the Personnel Subcommittee of the Faculty Executive Committee in order to make the case for a promotion review. If the Subcommittee and the full FEC decide that the petition for review has merit, the FEC appoints a committee to conduct the review in place of the department chair. A decision to appoint a review committee carries no pre-judgment regarding the outcome of the review process.

In the case of denial of promotion to Full Professor, the Dean provides the candidate with a written summary of the file and rationale for the decision.

C. Procedures for Promotion of Department Chairs to Full Professor

Any department chair who is eligible and wishes to be considered for promotion to Full Professor so notifies his or her Divisional Executive Committee. When a Divisional Committee decides that a promotion review is appropriate, it acts as the department’s surrogate chair and initiates the review; or, after consulting with the Dean, the Committee appoints a tenured faculty member to conduct the review.

When a Divisional Executive Committee decides that a promotion review for a department chair is not advisable, it so informs the chair, the Faculty Executive Committee, and the Dean. The department chair may appeal to the Dean to reverse a Divisional Committee’s decision not to proceed. If the Dean agrees with the Committee’s decision, no further appeal is possible. If the Dean rules instead that the chair’s appeal has merit, the Dean makes that case to the Faculty Executive Committee. The FEC may either veto the proposed promotion review or appoint a tenured faculty member to conduct the review according to standard promotion procedures.

IX. NON-TENURE-TRACK FACULTY APPOINTMENTS

A. Adjunct Faculty

Adjunct Instructors, Assistant Professors, Associate Professors, and Professors are regular part- time, non-tenured members of the Colorado College faculty.

1. Appointment and review

In special circumstances, someone who has taught at least ten Blocks at Colorado College in a five-year period may be considered for adjunct faculty status. Candidates are reviewed by the appropriate department and Divisional Executive Committee and by the Faculty Executive Committee and the Dean. Upon receiving a positive recommendation from the Dean, the President makes the final decision about appointment to probationary adjunct status. After teaching the equivalent of six additional Blocks, an adjunct faculty member on probationary status may, after a second review, be granted regular adjunct faculty status; but adjunct faculty continue their employment at Colorado College by annual appointment rather than by the award of tenure.

2. Responsibilities and privileges

To an extent commensurate with adjunct status, adjunct faculty members are expected to contribute to the life of the College by participating in departmental or program activities, serving on appointive faculty committees, and advising students. Adjunct faculty may vote in all faculty meetings during an academic year in which they teach at least four Blocks.

3. Salary and benefits

The adjunct faculty salary per Block is no less than one-sixth of the minimum annual salary of a full-time faculty member in the same rank. Except in unusual circumstances, adjunct faculty members teach no more than five Blocks per year. The College may on occasion employ adjunct faculty for administrative tasks in addition to their regular teaching responsibilities. Adjunct faculty members are eligible for promotion, sabbatical leaves, travel monies, and research or study grants according to the same rules and procedures as pertain to tenure-track faculty. For purposes of calculating promotions and leaves, six teaching Blocks count as one academic year.

4. Change of status

If changing needs allow a department (or program) to convert an adjunct position to a full-time tenure-track position, the department must conduct a national search to fill the new position. If the person holding the adjunct position applies for the tenure-track position and becomes the successful candidate, Blocks taught in the adjunct position may count toward tenure if the letter of appointment includes such an agreement.

B. Riley Scholars-in-Residence

The Riley Scholars-in-Residence Program reflects the conviction that a strong minority presence on the faculty of a liberal arts college benefits the entire community. Scholars of African, Asian, Hispanic, and Native American ethnic identity afford the College a diversity of experience and perspective otherwise difficult to attain. By their presence as well as their knowledge, these scholars help to enlarge the world of their students and colleagues.

Academic departments collaborate with the Dean and the President to identify and hire promising Riley Scholars-in-Residence candidates. A particularly important resource is the annual roster of candidates made available by the Consortium for a Strong Minority Presence at Liberal Arts Colleges, to which Colorado College belongs. This association of selective undergraduate institutions supports minority scholars with dissertation and post-doctoral fellowships and encourages them to pursue careers in undergraduate teaching.

At Colorado College pre-doctoral Riley Scholars teach two Blocks during an academic year; post-doctoral Scholars teach three. The Riley Scholar and the Dean negotiate other details of a Riley appointment, including such benefits as funds to support research. In addition to their teaching and scholarship, all Riley Scholars are expected to interact regularly with students and participate in such functions as departmental seminars.

C. Block Visitors

Colorado College employs Block visitors for a variety of reasons. Some Block visitors, for example, enrich the curriculum with courses that draw upon their special academic expertise; some replace faculty members on leave. Block visitors are typically invited to Colorado College because they are known to a department by professional reputation, or they have been selected by means of a competitive process. In requesting approval of a Block visitor appointment, a department chair submits the candidate’s curriculum vitae to the Dean. At the end of the Block visitor’s course (or courses) the chair sends the Dean an assessment of her or his effectiveness as a teacher. Block visitors who hold a position at another academic institution are hired as a Visiting Professor at the corresponding faculty rank.

D. Full-time Faculty Replacements

In most circumstances, Colorado College allows departments or programs to replace faculty members who are away from the College on a year-long leave of absence. The President appoints (and reappoints) replacement faculty upon recommendation by the Dean, the Dean having consulted with the department chair. Replacement faculty members are normally hired as visiting professors at a rank appropriate to their education and experience or corresponding to their rank at another institution. One-year appointments may be extended no more than three times; a visiting professor may thus teach at Colorado College for no more than four years.

E. Lecturer Reviews

Lecturer is a category for faculty appointments that are made rarely and only in special circumstances. Lecturers are appointed and reappointed by the President upon recommendation by a department and the Dean. Every two years, the department chair, in consultation with departmental colleagues, conducts an evaluation of a Lecturer and forwards it to the Dean. Every fourth year the evaluation must include polling of current students and alumni who have taken classes from the Lecturer under review. The department chair submits the evaluation to the Dean.

F. Appointment Letters for Non-Tenure-Track Faculty

All appointments and reappointments for full- and part-time non-tenure track faculty, including their specific terms and conditions, are made by letter signed for the College by the President or the Dean. Only such a letter may be relied on for the terms of any faculty member’s appointment at the College. Appointments of non-tenure-track faculty are for one year and may be renewed, but the College sends letters of reappointment only after tenure-track positions have been filled.

X. FACULTY COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS

A. Salary

1. Determination of faculty salaries

Each fall the Faculty Salary Committee (the faculty members on the Compensation Committee) issues a salary report to the faculty and the administration. The Committee bases its report on compensation data from other colleges and universities, the current report of the Colorado College chapter of the American Association of University Professors, and conversation with the Budget and Planning Subcommittee of the Faculty Executive Committee. The administration takes the Salary Committee’s data and recommendations into consideration each year in preparing the College budget.

Each fall department chairs invite non-tenured members of their department to submit by semester’s end a description of their professional accomplishments over the past year, using as guidelines the standards for scholarship, effective teaching and advising, department and College service, and professional and civic activities that are set forth in this Handbook. The chair shares the evaluation of performance with the faculty member and informs the Divisional Executive Committee of the performance and salary recommendations, and the Divisional Executive Committee submits its own recommendations to the Dean. The Dean bases her or his salary recommendations to the President on both departmental and Divisional Executive Committee evaluations. The annual salary letters to faculty specify the amounts allocated to each component in the salary model used in the calculation of the total salary for that year.

Tenured faculty members participate in salary reviews every other year.

2. Payment of faculty salaries

Colorado College normally issues faculty paychecks eighteen times an academic year, on the business day closest to the 15th and the last day of the month. Faculty members who choose the alternative of being paid twenty-four times a calendar year must so inform the College Payroll Office before the start of the academic year. They must also inform the Payroll Office if they prefer electronic deposit.

The College makes salary advances only in situations of extreme emergency, and any request for a salary advance must be approved by the Vice President for Finance and Administration / Treasurer.

3. Deductions from faculty salaries

The Payroll Office deducts from all faculty salaries state and federal income taxes, Social Security payments, mandatory contributions to the College’s defined contribution retirement plan (TIAA-CREF), long-term disability insurance premiums, and Emeriti Retirement Health Solutions contributions. Faculty members may elect to pay for additional benefits through payroll deduction (see below E. Elective Benefits). Faculty members can also choose to make certain charitable donations through payroll deduction (for example, to United Way, Community Health Charities, or Community Shares or to Colorado College programs such as KRCC, the Annual Giving Fund, or the Financial Aid to Minority Students fund).

B. Non-Salary Employment Benefits

Colorado College provides certain statutory benefits to all its employees, faculty and staff, in compliance with applicable regulations for Social Security, Medicare, Workers’ Compensation and Unemployment Insurance.

Mandatory faculty benefit programs, requiring participation as a condition of employment, include the College’s Defined Contribution Retirement Plan, long-term disability insurance, and Emeriti Retirement Health Solutions.

Voluntary benefit programs available to faculty members include group life, medical, and dental insurance and the supplemental retirement plan offered through the College.

Faculty members are encouraged to become familiar with the benefits offered by these various programs as well as their eligibility requirements. Additional information is available from the Human Resources Office.

C. Educational Assistance Benefits

Colorado College offers full-time faculty members and their eligible dependents three educational assistance programs: tuition remission at Colorado College; tuition exchange with any participating member of the Associated Colleges of the Midwest; and partial tuition payment at other colleges or universities. For faculty members only, the College offers tuition assistance at other institutions.

Additional information about these benefits, as well as eligibility requirements, is available from the Human Resources Office.

D. Support for Faculty Scholarship and Research

The College provides various kinds of support for faculty research and development. Details are available at http://www.coloradocollege.edu/offices/dean/grants-for-faculty/

E. Life Insurance Benefit

If a tenure-track faculty member, an adjunct faculty member, or a Riley Scholar-in-Residence dies while employed by the College or while on authorized unpaid leave, the named beneficiary or the estate of the deceased receives a life insurance benefit equal to 1.5 times the base annual salary of the decedent (to the policy maximum). In the event of death resulting from an accident, the surviving spouse or the estate receives, in addition, an Accidental Death and Dismemberment benefit equal to 1.5 times the base annual salary of the decedent (to the policy maximum). The surviving spouse or estate of a participant in the Early Retirement program receives a life insurance benefit based on his or her Early Retirement Compensation.

XI. EMPLOYMENT OUTSIDE THE COLLEGE

The primary professional responsibility of full-time faculty members is to fulfill the educational mission of Colorado College by means of effective teaching, productive scholarship, and service to the College community. No outside employment may be allowed to distract a faculty member from these obligations.

A faculty member who plans to engage in remunerative work outside the College during the academic year must inform the department chair and the Dean of the nature and duration of the outside employment and obtain their prior written approval. Such employment should contribute to the faculty member’s professional development and, when possible, enhance the public reputation of the College. The College expects all full-time faculty members, including those who work outside the College, to fulfill all normal faculty responsibilities throughout the academic year.

A faculty member who intends to make use of College resources (for example, staff or student assistants, a College laboratory, certain resources of the library) in his or her outside employment must obtain from the College a written statement of agreement that acknowledges the College’s right to proper compensation under the laws of the State of Colorado that govern the operation of non-profit institutions.

XII. FACULTY LEAVES

A. Sabbatical Leaves

1. Purpose

The sabbatical leave policy of Colorado College is designed to benefit both individual faculty members and the College as a whole. By providing opportunity for professional growth and intellectual enrichment not ordinarily possible under the demands of regular College responsibilities, sabbatical leaves enable faculty members to become better scholars and teachers and more effective members of the College community.

2. Eligibility and requirements

All tenure-track and adjunct faculty members are eligible to apply every sixth year for a sabbatical leave to be taken in the seventh year since the previous sabbatical leave (or, initially, since beginning employment at Colorado College). Faculty may choose full-year or half-year sabbatical leaves—an eight-Block leave at five-ninths salary or a four-Block leave at full salary. In addition to their initial seventh-year sabbatical leave, untenured faculty members are also eligible for a four-Block sabbatical in the year following a positive third-year review. For adjunct faculty, six teaching Blocks count as one academic year of full-time service.

Colorado College regards sabbatical leaves as a valuable benefit but not an assured entitlement. Accordingly, sabbatical applications must make a convincing case that, if granted, the leave would contribute to the goals of the sabbatical policy. After consulting with the department chair, a faculty member desiring a sabbatical leave submits to the Dean, in early fall preceding the year the leave would be taken, an application letter that describes the proposed sabbatical project(s) and explains how the leave could be expected to make him or her a more productive scholar or a more effective teacher. The faculty member’s chair also sends the Dean an assessment of the proposed leave’s likely contribution to the applicant’s professional development and its impact on departmental staffing needs. Sabbatical projects may vary considerably in their aim and emphasis—from study, research, writing, or artistic creation to reading about pedagogy and devising new courses to travel, reflection, and personal renewal. Untenured faculty members are strongly urged to take into account the diagnostic results of their third-year review as they plan their sabbatical leave.

The Dean forwards all sabbatical applications to the Faculty Research and Development Board, on which she or he serves. The Board evaluates the merits of each sabbatical proposal, considers the likely impact of particular leaves on individual departments and the College, and recommends to the Dean that a sabbatical request be either granted or refused or that the leave be delayed for a year.

Faculty members who delay a sabbatical leave by a year, whether at their request for the purpose of professional development or at the request of the College, are not penalized by losing a year in the sabbatical cycle.

In general, the College does not pay travel expenses to anyone on sabbatical leave or to any part- time faculty member (except adjunct faculty when they are not on leave). If funds are available in the latter part of an academic year, the Dean may approve additional trips for faculty members.

Sabbatical leaves are usually taken within a single academic year, and faculty members are normally obligated to return to Colorado College for at least one year following a sabbatical.

B. Appointments to Positions with Associated Colleges of the Midwest

After consulting with their department chair and obtaining the approval of the Dean, Colorado College faculty members may apply for the position of director of off-campus study programs offered by the Associated Colleges of the Midwest. The term of appointment is usually one semester. For purposes of determining eligibility for benefits such as tenure and sabbatical leaves, the College makes no distinction between on-campus service and ACM appointments. ACM pays program directors’ salary and expenses. Colorado College pays the salary of any faculty replacement required by a program director’s absence from campus.

C. Unpaid Non-Medical Leaves

In order to accommodate individual needs that its sabbatical program is not designed to meet, Colorado College allows faculty members to apply for unpaid leaves that can range in length from a single Block to two years. Applications for planned unpaid leaves are due in the Dean’s Office early in the fall of the academic year preceding the year in which the leave is to be taken. Applications must be accompanied by a statement from the department chair that describes the effect of the leave on the department and provides the chair’s judgment regarding the need for a replacement. Full-year unpaid leaves may count toward eligibility for tenure or sabbatical leave only with the Dean’s prior approval. Such approval requires evidence that the requested leave would benefit the College by enhancing the faculty member’s professional development.

D. Medical Leaves

1. Paid medical leaves

On a case-by-case basis, the College provides full-time and adjunct faculty members leaves of absence necessitated by health problems. The College requires a physician’s certification of the injury or illness that is the basis of the faculty member’s request for a leave. The College may ask for a second opinion, at its expense, from a physician of its choosing and may periodically evaluate the faculty member’s situation.

After consulting with the department chair and the Dean, the President may approve the continuation of the faculty member’s salary for a period not to exceed 180 calendar days for full- time faculty, the number of days pro-rated for adjunct faculty.

The College grants maternity leaves to full-time faculty on the same conditions as those that apply to leaves for illness or injury. A maternity leave during the academic year is normally for two Blocks and begins with the Block in which delivery is expected.

Paid medical leaves are counted toward the twelve weeks of unpaid leave provided under the Family Medical Leave Act.

2. Unpaid medical leaves

Under provisions of the Family Medical Leave Act, the College provides unpaid leaves of absence to full-time faculty who have been employed at the College for at least one academic year. Legitimate grounds for such leaves include medical or family exigencies—for example, a faculty member’s illness, injury, or pregnancy; childbirth and the care of a newborn; caring for a spouse, parent or child with unusual needs. A leave request occasioned by injury or illness must be supported by a physician’s certification, and the College may request a second opinion, at its expense, from a physician of its choosing.

A faculty member who has been granted a paid medical leave is eligible for an unpaid leave only after the termination of the paid leave. Unpaid medical leaves are limited to one per calendar year and may not exceed a period of twelve weeks. A paid leave counts toward the twelve weeks of unpaid leave provided under provisions of the Family Medical Leave Act.

Normal benefits continue for faculty members on unpaid medical leave, but benefit costs that are calculated as a percentage of salary (for example, FICA and contributions to the Defined Contribution Retirement Plan) will not be the same.

E. Parental Leaves

Colorado College’s Parental Leave policy provides a full-time faculty member time away from normal College responsibilities in order to care for and bond with her or his newborn or newly- adopted child. The paid leave provided by the College is taken concurrently with the first eight weeks of the twelve-week parental leave guaranteed by the Family Medical Leave Act. Faculty members who anticipate taking parental leave should discuss their plans with their department chair, submit any necessary documentation to the Human Resources Office, and request the Dean’s approval of the leave. Someone who wishes to take parental leave as a domestic partner must file an Affidavit of Domestic Partnership with the Human Resources Office.

Additional information regarding parental leaves is available from the Human Resources Office.

F. Replacements for Faculty Members on Leave

When possible, the College provides replacements for faculty members on leave. The chief purpose of the College’s practice of leave replacement is to ensure the continuing quality of the academic program and, above all, to provide staffing for courses required for departmental majors.

G. Salary and Benefits During Leaves

Salary and benefits continue during sabbatical leaves, but benefit costs that are calculated as a percentage of base salary will differ from the faculty member’s normal costs according to sabbatical compensation (that is, either full pay or five-ninths pay).

Faculty members on a full-year sabbatical may accept employment outside the College for the equivalent of one-half the leave; but if they are employed and receive benefits elsewhere during the leave, during that time they will not receive similar benefits from the College.

The spirit of the sabbatical program requires that faculty members on half-year sabbatical leave not be employed elsewhere and not receive any non-College salary or other compensation. Faculty members planning an unpaid leave may consult with the Human Resources Office regarding benefits for which they are eligible. Faculty members on unpaid leave are responsible for making arrangements with the Human Resources Office to pay for their benefit programs.
A faculty member who desires a change in salary payment because of a planned leave must make the necessary arrangements with the Business Office at least thirty days before the leave is to begin. The College expects faculty members on leave to keep the Business Office, the Dean’s Office, and the College mail service informed of any forwarding address or other new contact information.

For more detailed current information regarding benefits during leaves, contact the Human Resources Office.

XIII. TERMINATION OF EMPLOYMENT

A. Resignation

A faculty member who wishes to resign a Colorado College appointment should submit a letter of resignation to the Dean by April 1 of the academic year at the end of which the resignation is to become effective (normally the date of Commencement). A letter of resignation can be withdrawn only upon the recommendation of the Dean and the written approval of the President.

B. Retirement

A faculty member who plans to retire from Colorado College should so inform the department chair and the Dean, in writing, at least one year prior to the effective retirement date.

Upon retirement from Colorado College, all faculty members (tenure-track, adjunct, lecturer) with at least ten years of service to the college will be recommended to the Board of Trustees for emeritus status.

Faculty members who retire from Colorado College at age 60 with 5 full- or part-time years of service or age 55 with 10 full- or part-time years of service and who are not participants in the College’s Early Retirement program are eligible for retirement benefits that include medical, dental, vision, and long-term care insurance—although the manner of paying for these benefit programs changes. Retirees enrolled in Medicare may participate in the Emeriti Retirement Health Plan. The College provides a $5,000 life insurance policy for every retiree.

Retired faculty members continue to have many of the privileges that they enjoyed during their teaching career. Among these privileges are the use of Tutt Library, free admittance to the Fine Arts Center, a College e-mail account, tuition benefits, and concerts and lectures at the College. Retirees may also attend faculty meetings, but they cannot vote. Although they no longer have a role in departmental decisions regarding curriculum, pedagogy, resource allocation, and faculty or staff hiring, retired faculty may teach at the College on a Block-by-Block basis (at Block visitor rates).

Further details about benefits for retirees are available from the Human Resources Office.

C. Early Retirement

Colorado College offers tenure-track and adjunct faculty members two other options for retirement between ages 59.5 and 70—Full Early Retirement and Phased Early Retirement. The benefit period is three years if the early retiree is between the ages of 59.5 and 67, two years at age 68, and one year at age 69. After the change of status from regular tenure-track faculty to early retiree, a participant in the program may not return to full-time teaching at Colorado College. A faculty member relinquishes tenure irrevocably upon entering Full Early Retirement and upon completing Phased Early Retirement. Compensation for any teaching after a retiree has completed Full Early Retirement or Phased Early Retirement will be at Block-visitor rates.

1. Eligibility and approval

Any full-time or adjunct faculty member who has completed at least 20 years of service at Colorado College by the end of an academic year and who will be 59.5 years old by August 31 of that year may submit a written application for Early Retirement to the Dean of the College. The application must be received in the Dean’s Office by September 30 of the academic year preceding the year that early retirement would begin. The Dean forwards the application and her or his recommendation to the President. The President must approve all requests to enter the Early Retirement program.

The President may deny a request for Early Retirement for any of several reasons: his or her approval would jeopardize the goals of a College program or academic department; the College would likely be unable to replace the prospective early retiree with a similarly qualified person at an appropriate compensation level; approval would make it more difficult for the College to meet its financial, legal, or other contractual obligations; approval would entail the risk of negatively affecting audit, accreditation, or other reviews.

If the President is unable to approve all applications for Early Retirement in a given year, he or she will normally give priority to applicants who are oldest, those with the most years of service to Colorado College, and those whose request was earlier denied. A person whose application for Full Early Retirement is not approved by the President may decide to continue as a full-time faculty member the following year or may apply to participate in Phased Early Retirement the following year. In either case, in the following year the faculty member may reapply for Full Early Retirement. In no case, however, may the Early Retirement benefit period—that is, the total time in Full Early Retirement only or in Phased Early Retirement only or in a combination of Phased Early Retirement and Full Early Retirement—exceed three years.

2. Full Early Retirement compensation and benefits

Full Early Retirement participants receive Early Retirement Compensation equal to 50% of what their salary would have been had they continued as regular tenure-track faculty. Any adjustments for inflation are included in subsequent salary calculations. The College makes normal-rate contributions to the faculty member’s Defined Contribution Retirement Plan (TIAA-CREF) on the basis of his or her Early Retirement Compensation, and participants remain eligible to contribute to supplemental tax-deferred retirement plans offered by the College through TIAA- CREF.

Full Early Retirement participants receive the same medical insurance coverage provided regular faculty and staff, and the College continues to pay the same percentage of insurance premiums. College and employee contributions to the Emeriti Program also continue. The long-term disability benefit is not available to Full Early Retirement participants; but other benefits funded by voluntary contributions, including group optional life insurance, continue to be available. If a faculty member dies while a Full Early Retirement participant, the College’s life insurance benefit is 1.5 times the decedent’s Early Retirement Compensation.

Full Early Retirement participants may not teach at Colorado College except in emergency situations and by agreement with the department, the Dean and the President. Compensation for teaching under such circumstances is at Block-visitor rates.

Early Retirement Compensation for Full Early Retirement adjunct faculty is based upon the average number of courses taught during the five years prior to beginning participation in the program. Fringe benefits previously available continue.

The academic department or program of a Full Early Retirement participant may submit a written application for a full-time replacement to the Dean of the College. Any replacement is at the discretion of the Dean.

3. Phased Early Retirement responsibilities and benefits

Phased Early Retirement participants teach half time (three Blocks per academic year) and are expected to continue to fulfill all normal faculty responsibilities. They receive Early Retirement Compensation equal to 70% of what their salary would have been had they continued as regular tenure-track faculty. Participants remain eligible for all the benefits available to regular faculty members except sabbatical leaves and long-term disability insurance. If a faculty member dies while a Phased Early Retirement participant, the College’s life insurance benefit is 1.5 times the decedent’s Early Retirement Compensation.

The Dean may authorize part-time replacements for Phased Early Retirement participants to the extent that in a given year replacements can be funded by the difference between the salaries and benefits of Phased Early Retirement faculty and the salaries and benefits these persons would have earned had they remained regular faculty members.

A faculty member who initially chooses the Phased Early Retirement option may subsequently apply for Full Early Retirement, but the total time that anyone participates in the College’s Early Retirement program may not exceed three years. After becoming a participant in Early Retirement, a faculty member may not withdraw from the program.

4. Review of the Early Retirement program

The Early Retirement program is subject to periodic review by the Board of Trustees and may be amended or revoked at the Board’s discretion, provided that revocation or amendment does not affect current participants.

D. Dismissal and Procedures for Appeal

1. Dismissal prior to the tenure decision

On the basis of a negative third-year review, the Dean may offer a faculty member a terminal contract prior to the tenure decision. Independently of the third-year review, and after consulting with the Faculty Executive Committee, the Dean also may decide that an untenured faculty member’s professional incompetence, neglect of College responsibilities, serious violation of College policies, flagrantly immoral conduct, or illegal conduct that brings the College into disrepute is sufficient cause not to renew an appointment. In either case, the faculty member has the right to petition the President to override the Dean’s decision. Petition to the President must be made, in writing, no more than fourteen days after the faculty member has received written notice of the Dean’s intention to offer a terminal contract.

2. Denial of tenure

A faculty member informed of the Dean's decision to recommend a denial of tenure has the right to appeal that negative recommendation.  To initiate the appeal process the faculty member requests that the President constitute an appeal panel.  The request must be in writing and must be received by the President no more than fourteen days (excluding Winter Break) after the faculty member has been notified of the Dean's recommendation.  The President will select the three person appeal panel from the 12 member Faculty Appeals Board.  Whenever possible, the final appeal panel shall include one Faculty Appeals Board member, from each division.  The appeal panel is not obligated to meet with the faculty member who initiates the appeal process, but may do so if it deems this appropriate, and shall do so if requested by the faculty member.

This Faculty Appeals Board shall be constituted of 12 tenured faculty members who will be elected by the faculty to three year terms.  All tenured faculty members, with the exception of department chairs, associate chairs, Divisional Executive Committee members, Faculty Executive Committee members, and deans will be eligible for selection to this standing pool.  The election shall take place in two rounds: In the first round, nine members (three from each division) shall be elected.  In the second round, three more at-large members will be elected.  To ensure representation from interdisciplinary programs, should no such person be included in the first nine, the person who receives the most votes and who is affiliated with an interdisciplinary program shall be included among the at-large members.  All 12 members of the Faculty Appeals Board will be supported in their role by receiving appropriate training as determined by the Dean.

The appeal panel reviews the file of the faculty member making the appeal and may interview any persons who participated in the process leading to the Dean’s recommendation. The review by the appeal panel is limited to a determination whether the procedures that were followed prior to the Dean’s recommendation accorded with those prescribed in this Handbook and whether the Dean’s recommendation is based on a proper and adequate consideration of the file. The appeal panel should not substitute its own judgment for that of the Dean on the merits of whether the faculty member should be given tenure. We affirm the definitions of “proper” and “adequate” formulated by the American Association of University Professors:

Because of the broader significance of a violation of academic freedom or of improper discrimination, the Association believes that the procedures to be followed in these two kinds of complaints should be kept separate from a complaint over adequacy of consideration... If a faculty member on probationary or other non-tenured appointment alleges that a decision against reappointment was based significantly on considerations that violate (1) academic freedom or (2) governing policies on making appointments without prejudice with respect to race, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, or sexual orientation, the allegation will be given preliminary consideration by the [Colorado College Anti-Discrimination Grievance Board]...

Complaints of inadequate consideration are likely to relate to matters of professional judgment, where the department or departmental agency should have primary authority. For this reason, the basic functions of the review committee should be to determine whether the appropriate faculty body gave adequate consideration to the faculty member’s candidacy in reaching its decision and, if the review committee determines otherwise, to request reconsideration by that body.

It is easier to state what the standard “adequate consideration” does not mean than to specify in detail what it does. It does not mean that the review committee should substitute its own judgment for that of members of the department on the merits of whether the candidate should be reappointed or given tenure (http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/pubsres/policydocs/contents/nonreapp-stmt.htm). The conscientious judgment of the candidate’s departmental colleagues must prevail if the invaluable tradition of departmental autonomy in professional judgments is to prevail. The term “adequate consideration” refers essentially to procedural rather than to substantive issues: Was the decision conscientiously arrived at? Was all available evidence bearing on the relevant performance of the candidate sought out and considered? Was there adequate deliberation by the department over the import of the evidence in light of the relevant standards? Were irrelevant and improper standards excluded from consideration? Was the decision a bona fide exercise of professional academic judgment? These are the kinds of questions suggested by the standard “adequate consideration.”

If, in applying this standard, the review committee concludes that adequate consideration was not given, its appropriate response should be to recommend to the department that it assess the merits once again, this time remedying the inadequacies of its prior consideration.
[American Association of University Professors: Policy Documents and Reports. 10th edition. (Washington D.C.: American Association of University Professors, 2006), 19–21]

If the appeal panel finds inadequate procedure in the tenure review, the appeal panel returns the tenure file to the stage in the process where the error occurred for correction. All materials added to the file subsequent to the stage of error are withdrawn from the file and returned to those who submitted them. After the procedural error is corrected, the file proceeds through the tenure review again and subsequent materials may be added to the file as originally submitted or as rewritten. The appeal panel states the reasons for its findings in a written report to the President within four weeks (excluding Winter Break) of the appeal panel's appointment.

If the faculty member making the appeal alleges a violation of the Colorado College Anti-Discrimination Policy in the tenure review, the President shall refer the matter  to an anti-discrimination grievance panel for its consideration in accordance with the rules and procedures established for such panel and a determination whether a violation of the Anti-Discrimination Policy occurred. If an anti-discrimination grievance panel determines that such a violation occurred, the President shall return the tenure file to the stage in the process where the alleged discrimination occurred for correction. All materials added to the file subsequent to the alleged discrimination are withdrawn from the file and returned to those who submitted them. After the alleged discrimination is corrected, the file proceeds through the tenure review again and subsequent materials may be added to the file as originally submitted or as rewritten.

If the President finds no procedural grounds for reconsidering the tenure file, but intends to reverse the recommendation of the Dean, the President discusses with the Faculty Executive Committee his or her reasons for either denying tenure or recommending to the Board of Trustees that tenure be awarded in this case. The President communicates the recommendation to the faculty member within two weeks of receiving the appeal board’s report. The President’s recommendation may not be appealed.

3. Dismissal of tenured faculty

The Board of Trustees has the sole authority to terminate a tenured appointment at Colorado College. Financial exigency of the College, in all cases, shall constitute sufficient cause for termination of a tenured appointment. The Board may also dismiss tenured faculty members from employment by the College because of professional incompetence, willful neglect of College responsibilities, serious violation of College policies, flagrantly immoral conduct, or illegal conduct that brings the College into disrepute.

Dismissal of a tenured faculty member for cause is one of the most serious actions the College can take and normally follows a history of progressively more objectionable conduct in which instances of lesser offense have resulted in disciplinary actions as described in this Handbook (PART TWO, XIV). After reviewing the evidence, the Dean meets with the faculty member to discuss the nature and severity of the grounds for dismissal and to attempt to reach mutually agreeable terms of separation from the College or of continued employment. If agreement proves impossible, the faculty member may request a fact-finding inquiry by the Faculty Executive Committee. After consulting with the FEC and receiving its recommendation, the Dean either decides that termination is not justified or recommends dismissal to the President. If the Dean recommends dismissal, she or he sends the faculty member a written statement that details the reasons for termination.

A faculty member who has been informed of the Dean’s recommendation for dismissal may request the President to empanel a hearing committee from the Faculty Appeals Board, consisting of three tenured faculty members, to conduct a formal hearing and submit its findings and recommendation to the President. The request for a formal hearing must be in writing and must be received by the President not more than fourteen days after the Dean has informed the faculty member of the College’s intent to terminate his or her appointment.

As the hearing committee is in process of being formed, the faculty member may challenge, without stated cause, one of the candidates proposed by the President as members of the committee.  The President shall appoint another member of the Faculty Appeals Board to replace the challenged member.  

The Dean provides the faculty member written notice of the hearing, including specific charges, at least thirty days in advance. The hearing committee selects a chair from its members, gathers and reviews documents relevant to the case, and assembles a list of witnesses. The faculty member and the College may each call witnesses to testify. Both may present other evidence, and both may question all witnesses. The faculty member and the College may each be accompanied by legal counsel, but the attorneys are not permitted to raise objections. The hearing committee follows the procedure specified in this Handbook and is not bound by legal rules of evidence. Upon request, the College provides the faculty member a written transcript of the proceedings without cost.

At any time prior to the hearing committee’s final recommendation, the President may suspend the faculty member with pay if the President, after consultation with the FEC and the Dean, determines that the faculty member poses a danger to self or others or that the faculty member’s conduct significantly interferes with the academic mission or the daily operations of the College.

The hearing committee determines whether there is adequate cause for dismissal and reports its finding in writing to the President, who provides a summary of the report to the faculty member. If the committee determines there is not adequate cause for dismissal, and the President rejects that finding, the President states in writing his or her reasons for disagreement to the hearing committee, the FEC, and the faculty member. The President considers their responses before sending her or his recommendation to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees.

If the hearing committee finds that there is adequate cause for dismissal, it may recommend either dismissal or a less severe form of discipline. If the hearing committee finds that there is not adequate cause for dismissal but that the faculty member’s conduct is in violation of College policies, it may also recommend disciplinary action short of termination. (For discipline other than dismissal, see PART TWO, XIV.)

If the hearing committee concludes there is adequate cause for dismissal and the President agrees with this conclusion, the President sends his or her recommendation to the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees. In that case, the faculty member may request that the President also provide a written record of the proceedings. The Executive Committee reviews the record of the hearing and the report of the hearing committee; in addition, it may receive oral or written testimony from the faculty member, the hearing committee, the Dean, or the President. After this process of deliberation, the Executive Committee brings its recommendation to the full Board at its next scheduled meeting. The decision of the Board of Trustees is final.

4. Notice of termination

A tenure-track faculty member whose appointment is not renewed during the probationary period receives notice according to the following schedule: by March 1 in the first year of service; by December 15 in the second year of service; one year in advance if the decision not to renew the appointment is made after at least two years of service. In the latter case, the faculty member may receive a year’s salary rather than return to the College for a third year.

When the College terminates the appointment of a tenured faculty member, that person may return to the College for one final year or receive one year’s salary and leave the College at the end of the current year. A faculty member dismissed because of flagrantly immoral conduct is entitled to neither option.

At any time prior to the effective date of termination the President may suspend a faculty member with pay if the President, after consultation with the FEC and the Dean, determines that the faculty member poses a danger to self or others or that the faculty member’s conduct significantly interferes with the academic mission or the daily operations of the College.

XIV. DISCIPLINE OTHER THAN DISMISSAL

If the Dean becomes aware that a faculty member’s professional or personal conduct seriously interferes with the fulfillment of his or her College responsibilities or violates College policies but does not provide sufficient cause for dismissal, the Dean meets with the faculty member to detail the objectionable conduct and to give the faculty member opportunity to respond. After this meeting, the Dean makes a determination of responsibility and decides whether disciplinary measures are appropriate.

Examples of unacceptable neglect of duty include but are not limited to excessive absenteeism, inappropriate use of College resources, and failure to assume departmental responsibilities. Such behaviors call for disciplinary measures proportionate to the nature and extent of the misconduct and increasing in severity with repeated offenses. Discipline may take various forms, including but not limited to a reprimand that becomes part of the faculty member’s permanent file, placement on probationary status with stipulated conditions to be met before reinstatement, temporary suspension from the faculty without pay, demotion in rank, or removal from an endowed professorship. A faculty member subject to such discipline has the right to petition the President to revoke the Dean’s disciplinary sanction. The President’s decision is final.