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Understanding Nonviolent Power: Civil Resistance as a Force for Rights, Freedom, and Justice in the 21st Century

Location

Gaylord Hall
main floor of Worner Campus Center, 902 N. Cascade Ave. (map)

Description

Nonviolent civil resistance movements around the world are a growing force in shaping geopolitics.  From the Arab Spring, to movements over the last two decades in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Latin America, and North America, the world has witnessed how ordinary people have used nonviolent tactics -- such as strikes, boycotts, mass demonstrations, and other actions -- to achieve rights, freedom, and justice.  Yet, this critical phenomenon is often overlooked or misunderstood by external observers.  It defies conventional wisdom that unarmed people mobilizing by the thousands or millions can defeat armed, wealthy, and organized adversaries who seem to have all the advantages.  This presentation will focus on why civil resistance works, what its long-term record and outcomes are, and how it will increasingly affect social, economic, and political change

Hardy Merriman is a senior advisor to the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict.  For the last decade, he has worked with scholars and practitioners from around the world to research and educate people about the power of nonviolent civil resistance.  He has edited works such as "Waging Nonviolent Struggle" by Gene Sharp and co-authored "A Guide to Effective Nonviolent Struggle," a training curriculum for activists.

Understanding Nonviolent Power: Civil Resistance as a Force for Rights, Freedom, and Justice in the 21st Century
Hardy Merriman
  • Open to Public: Yes
  • Admission Fee: Free
  • Sponsored By: Program in Nonviolence
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