Skip to main content area Skip to institutional navigation Skip to sub-navigation

Emeriti

Emeriti


Glenn Brooks - became Professor Emeritus in 1996. He received his B.A. Magna Cum Laude (1953) and M.A. (1956) from the University of Texas, and his Ph.D. (Distinction) from Johns Hopkins University in 1960. He joined the College faculty in 1960. In 1967-68 he was a Rockefeller Visiting Lecturer at University College-Nairobi in Kenya. From 1968 until 1970 he served part time as Faculty Assistant to the President, assisting in the development of the Colorado College Plan. In 1978-79 he held a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship at Princeton University. He was appointed Dean of the College and Faculty in 1979 and held that position until 1987, when he returned to the department. His principal research interest has been in the politics and management of higher education. He was a staff author, with Malcolm Moos and Francis Rourke, of The Campus and the State (1959); author of When Governors Convene (1961); and co-author with Francis Rourke of The Managerial Revolution in Higher Education (1967), along with articles and reports. He is currently engaged in evaluations of civilian university programs on U.S. military bases for the American Council on Education.


Lief Carter - Lief served as CC's McHugh Distinguished Professor of American Institutions and Leadership from 1995 to 2004. He taught at the University of Georgia from 1973 to 1995. Before going to Georgia he received college and law degrees from Harvard, served in the Peace Corps in Bolivia, and earned his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley. Professor Carter has published major texts in constitutional law, legal reasoning, and administrative law. He was the first faculty member at the University of Georgia to receive the top award for teaching in two different years, and he has won national awards and recognition from the American Political Science Association.  He has served as visiting professor at Brown University and the University of Washington. His book, Reason in Law, appears in its seventh edition in 2005. He has been a member of and choir director at St. Gregory, the Great Episcopal Church in Athens, Georgia, and has an avid amateur interest in music. In 2001 he was a scholar in residence at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Center in Italy. At CC, he taught courses on leadership, constitutional law, and the politics of the legal process.

THE GOOD LOOK: HOW COLLEGE FOOTBALL REFEREES CONSTRUCT AND ACHIEVE JUDICIAL IMPARTIALITY


Curtis Cook - has taught at Colorado College since 1983. He retired in May 2002, but will continue to teach occasional courses for the department. He received a Ph.D. in Political Science from Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore) in 1975 and a B.S. from the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs in 1959. Before coming to CC, he was chair of the Department of Political Science at the Air Force Academy, where he taught from 1974 to 1982.

He is a member of the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States, the Atlantic Council, and the Inter-University Consortium on Armed Forces and Society. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Denver Council on Foreign Relations and of the Colorado Springs World Affairs Council. He teaches the introduction to the major as well as courses in international relations. He is the editor of Constitutional Predicament: Canada after the Referendum of 1992, published by McGill-Queen's in 1994, co-editor with Professor Lindau of Aboriginal Rights and Self-Government: Canada in North American Perspective published by McGill-Queen's in 2000, and is working on a study of the new progressivism in America. He is married to Avis Cook, who teaches elementary school in Monument. They have a daughter, Jennifer (CC '84) and a son, Bradford.


 David Finley - has taught at Colorado College since 1963. He was Dean of Faculty and College from 1987 to 1992, returning to the department as a full-time professor in 1993. He retired from the college in 1998 but still teaches some courses in the department. He received a Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1966 and a B.S. from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1955. He is a member of the APSA, AAASS, and the International Studies Association. He is the author (with Jan F. Triska) of Soviet Foreign Policy (Macmillan, 1968); his recent essays include “Market Liberalization and Democratic Politics: Perspectives from the Russian Experience” (1996), “Domestic Roots of Foreign Policy under Khrushchev and Gorbachev” (1992), and “The United States and the Soviet Union in Space” (1989). He is a specialist in post-Soviet politics and regularly teaches courses in comparative politics in Russia and Eastern Europe, and Russian foreign policy. He is married to Judy Finley. They have one son and two daughters, both of whom are CC graduates.


Bob Loevy - has taught at Colorado College since 1968. He received a B.A. from Williams College in 1957 and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Johns Hopkins University in 1963. He worked on Capitol Hill for several years in the 1960s. He regularly teaches courses in American Government, State and Local Politics, and the Civil Rights Movement. He has participated as a campaign consultant or campaign manager in a number of political campaigns in Colorado.  He is the author of The Flawed Path to the Presidency 1992: Unfairness and Inequality in the Presidential Selection Process (State University of New York Press, 1995); The Flawed Path to the Governorship 1994: The Nationalization of a Colorado Statewide Election Campaign (University Press of America, 1996), Colorado Politics and Government: Governing the Centennial State (with Thomas E. Cronin) (University of Nebraska Press, 1993); To End all Segregation: The Politics of the Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (University Press of America, 1990), American Government: We Are One (with John Whitman et al.) (Coronado, 1987), and he is the editor and major contributor to The Civil Rights Act of 1964: The Passage of the Law that Ended Racial Segregation (State University of New York Press, 1997).   He has also self-published his book, Small States First, Large States Last: Reforming the Presidential Election Process 2000 on his web site.

 

Retired

Andy Dunham -  taught at Colorado College from 1980, until his retirement in the spring of 2014. He received a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago in 1981 and a B.A. From Haverford College in 1969. His dissertation at Chicago ("Health and Politics") won the William Anderson Award (1982) given by the American Political Science Association for the best dissertation in 1980 and 1981 in intergovernmental relations. He was a Congressional Fellow in 1983-84, where he served as Legislative Assistant to Senator Max Baucus and Health Advisor to Senator Gary Hart. He is a member of the American Political Science Association, the National Women's Studies Association, and the Western Political Science Association. He organized the "Public Policy" section for the annual meeting of the WPSA in 1993-94 and served from 1983 to 1993 on the editorial board of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law. He regularly teaches courses in public policy, the U.S. Congress, and American politics and government. Essays include "Political Science, Science, and Feminism" (1993), "Changing Patterns of Elite Bureaucratic Recruitment and American State Capacity and Autonomy," (1990) and "Slouching Towards National Health Insurance" (1986).