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Course List

101 Greek for BeginnersIntroduction to the structure and vocabulary of classical Greek, with attention to those features that form the classical basis for Biblical koine and for the classical side of Greek diglossia from Hellenistic times through the 20th century.  Short texts from Homer to Kazantzakis and Cavafy provide practice in literary, philosophical and rhetorical reading and initiation in major areas of Western thought.  Attention to the history of the language and its relation to ancient, medieval and modern culture.  Carries Critical Perspectives: The West in Time designation.

111 Latin for Beginners.  Introduction to the structure of classical Latin; reading of short texts from Plautus to Milton and Newton to provide practice in literary and rhetorical reading and initiation in major areas of western thought.  Attention to the history of the language and its relation to ancient, medieval and modern culture.  Carries Critical Perspectives: The West in Time designation.

115 An Introduction to Classical Literature and Archaeology: Classical Freedom and Authority.  This course provides an introduction to ancient Greek and Roman cultures through reading of original sources and an examination of material culture.  Students will be exposed to literature from various genres (such as epic, dramatic, lyric and philosophical) and consider modern ways of receiving and interpreting them.  Texts include Homeric and Virgilian epic, Greek tragedy and comedy, Platonic and Epicurean philosophy, Greek and Roman historians.  We will explore archaeological sites throughout Greece and the Roman Empire, and objects found therein.  The course will offer an introduction to printed and online sources of information and to college-level writing.  The course as a whole meets Critical Perspectives: The West in Time.  First-year Experience. Carries Critical Perspectives: The West in Time designation. 

125 Ancient Multicultures. Survey of ancient history as an arena of cultural contact between different ethnic, religious and cultural communities. Emphasis on the Persian Empire as “other” to Greeks and Jews, on Alexandria as a “melting pot” or “salad bowl,” and on the Greco-Roman society of later antiquity as locus of changing identities. Mixed and dialogical cultural forms such as History, New Comedy, Pastoral, Apocalypse, Romance, Acts, and Gospel. Reading selected from Herodotus, the Bible, Plautus, Theocritus, Polybius, Vergil, Caesar Augustus, Philo and Petronius. (Also listed as History 209.) 1 unit — Cramer.

201/202 Reading in Greek.  Introduction to Greek literature, including Homer and dramatic, philosophical or historical writing.  Extended format.  Prerequisite: 101 or consent of instructor.  1/2 or 1 unit each; may be taught as block, semester or year, independent or group courses.

209 Late Antiquity. Continuity and change from Roman antiquity to the Christian Middle Ages in the art and architecture of Mediterranean lands (200–600 A.D.). The “decline” of Rome and the development of Christian imagery will be studied through art, archaeological sites, and texts-writings from the time as well as later historians. (Also listed as AH 209.) Prerequisite: AH 111, AH 112, AH 114 or consent of instructor. 1 unit — Kolarik  Block 7.

210 Greek Philosophy. Major writers and schools from the thousand year history of Greek philosophical research in the areas of nature, the gods, the mind, and ways of life: Ionian and Italian Pre-Socratics, Plato and the Academy, Aristotle, Pyrrho, the Cynics, the Stoa, Epicurus and Lucretius, and the revival in Late Antiquity of Pyrronian Scepticism and Platonism. Emphasis on close reading of the texts (including certain Greek terms) and on critical and comparative writing.Also listed as Philosophy 101.1 unit —

211/212 Reading in Latin.  Various ancient and medieval Latin works.  Extended format.  Prerequisite: 111. 1/2 or 1 unit each; may be taught as block, January 1/2 block, semester or year, independent or group courses.

216 Roman Hisotry I: The Ancient Roman Republic. Focus on the development of Rome, from a small city ruled by kings, to a regional power ruled under a Republic. The course will trace Rome's expansion through Italy, its conflict with Carthage and will closely examine the end of the Republic. Individuals discussed will include the Gracchi, generals Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Caesar, and Rome's greatest politician (and author) Cicero. (Also listed as History 216.) (Not offered 2013-14). 1 unit

218 Homer. (Not offered in 2013-14.) The Iliad and Odyssey as oral traditional poems, preservers of Bronze Age and archaic lore, locus of the creation of classical Greek culture and predecessors of European epic; together with Hesiodic epic and Homeric hymns.  Reading in English with attention to the formal Greek diction and the problems of translation, except that students who know Greek will read parts of the original text.  (Also listed as CO200.)  1 unit - Cramer

219 Origin and Early Forms of Theatre.  A study of origins, early texts, performance practices and developing theatrical conventions in various cultures, with special emphasis on ancient Greek and Roman theatre.  (Also listed as CO200, TH220.)  1 unit – Dobson

219 The Crisis in Athens: Tragedy, Comedy, and Wealth.  Fifth century Athens is widely considered to be one of the apexes of civilization in the west, in terms of politics, art, and society.  The century is bookended, however, by two devastating traumas: the economic crisis from the destruction of Athens in the Persian Wars, and the fall of the Athenian Democracy, precipitated, arguably, by the financial drain of the Sicilian Expedition.  As the theater of Dionysos is an important place where the Athenians worked out their social and political anxieties, in this class we will read economically themed Athenian drama, from Aeschylus’ Agamemnon to Aristophanes’ Wealth, with a view toward understanding attitudes toward monetary enrichment, poverty, and greed. Upon mastering the origins and early forms of ancient drama, students will select a contemporary event, “ripped from the headlines”, and cast it in the form of an Aristotelian Greek tragedy.  1 unit – Hughes

220 Myth and Meaning.   Religion and myth of ancient Greece and Rome in relation to that of the ancient Mediterranean (Akkadian, Hittite, Sumerian, Egyptian).  Female presence in art, literature and religion compared to treatment of women in their respective cultures.  Theoretical approaches to the understanding of myth (Comparative, Jungian, Structuralist) in relation to myths as they are encoded in their specific cultures.  Students may trace a myth through Medieval, Renaissance and modern transformations in art, music, poetry and film, or study myth in other cultures (e.g. Norse and Celtic).  (Also listed as CO200, FG220.)  1 unit – Dobson

221 The Invention of History.  (Not offered in 2013-14.) Herodotus, sometimes called the "father of lies", and Thucydides, sometimes called the first political scientist, treated as the first historians. Study of the ways of conceiving history and its relation to the peoples and periods explored.  No Greek or Latin required.  (Also listed as HY302.)  1 unit - Cramer

222 Topics.  Courses varying from year to year, to include offerings in classical and comparative religion and mythology, history, language and literature, anthropology, archaeology and women studies supplementary to those offered in the catalogue.  No Greek or Latin required.  1/2 unit (for semester extended format) or 1 unit - Department 

Alexander the Great and His Legacy.  (Not offered in 13-14.)  In this course we will examine the life of Alexander the Great and the ancient Mediterranean world in which he lived. We will also look at the impact he had on the historical development of that world after his death, the political use of his legacy from antiquity to the 21st century, and the fascination he continues to inspire.  (Also listed as HY209.)  1 unit - Daniel Leon

Race, Ethnicity and Prejudice in the Ancient World.  This course will introduce the theoretical concept of ethnicity and related issues as they played out in the ancient Mediterranean world.  In particular, we will focus on the way Greeks and Romans defined themselves and distinguished themselves from other peoples as a way of assigning meaning to the universe, and how those attitudes motivated their behavior towards outsiders.  We will also examine the practical effects of such discourses on the lives of people who lived in Greek and Roman communities without belonging to the dominant groups, and some of the ways in which modern approaches to race and ethnicity have structured and sometimes distorted our collective understanding of the past.  The materials we will study include literary, artistic, and archaeological evidence, as well as modern scholarship.  (Also listed as HY209/ES200.  Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.)  1 unit - Daniel Leon

Introduction to Field Archaeology. (Not offered in 13-14.) (Also listed as AN209. Taught in Menorca, Spain: airfare and program fee extra.)  1 unit - Thakur

Hellenistic Genres: Comedy, Pastoral, Novel.  Greek culture reached out into the world in new ways with Alexander the Great, and Greeks urbanized and cosmopolitanized in new ways.  City-state based Old Comedy gave way to the New Comedy of character and situation and whole new genres arose exploring and narrating the marginal and vernacular and still-enchanted fringe of an increasingly known world.  Pastoral evoked the experience of country people in hexameter verse, while prose romance-novels opened up the erotically charged space-time between infatuation and marriage. Reading from Menander, Plautus, Terence, Theocritus, Vergil, the Greek Romances and Petronius.  (Also listed as CO200.)  1 unit - Cramer

Ancient Sports and Entertainment.  The course considers the role sport and entertainment played in ancient society.  We begin by examining athletics in the Greek world, specifically the Olympics and other major games.  We will discuss the different types of events and then consider the evolving role athletics played in Greek education and society.  We will then transition to the Roman world, examining gladiatorial games, chariot racing, the theatre, and the Olympics in the Roman period.  We will trace the development of the status of athletes from amateurs to the professionalization of sport, and pause to consider the place of musicians and actors in Greek and Roman society.  Throughout the course students will become familiar with the architecture of related venues and investigate the role of spectators.  Students will continually be challenged to relate ancient athletics to the sports of today.  Sources will include Homer, Pindar, Virgil, Ovid, Martial and various inscriptions.  1 unit - Thakur

Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World. An introductory survey of issues relating to gender and sexuality in Greece and Rome.  The focus will be on the role of women in ancient society and their characterization in literature.  Though our sources are dominated by male perspectives, the class will attempt a balanced and accurate picture of ancient society.   The course will also place these literary depictions in the broader context of art, political and societal structure, religious belief and family relations.  Authors examined will include Hesiod, Homer, Aristophanes, Virgil, the female poets Sappho and Sulpicia, Ovid, and many more. (Also listed as Feminist and Gender Studies 206.) 1 unit - Thakur 

The Life of the Soul. Since the beginning of time, humans have been searching into the nature of the soul, its life and its meanings. Starting from the Greeks, this course seeks to discover how the concept of “soul” is understood, and how its life is conceived. We will explore the roots of these questions in ancient Greek epic, drama and philosophy, how these answers transform in medieval and renaissance literature, and how modernity offers strikingly new answers to them. One unit. Dobson.

223 The Art of Greece and Rome. Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. The development of Greek art from Geometric to Hellenistic with emphasis on the classical monuments of Athens. Etruscan art. Survey of Roman art from its origins to the late empire with emphasis on the imperial monuments and topography of Rome. Art of the mystery cults and early Christianity. Prerequisite: Art History 111, 112 or consent of instructor. (Also listed as Art History 207) 1 unit - Kolarik Block 3.

226 Roman History II: The Rise of the Ancient Roman Empire. Following a brief survey of prior Roman history, the course will examine the development of the Roman state in the late first century under the emperor Augustus. The course will proceed to consider the Empire's evolution and management under subsequent Julio-Claudian, Flavian, and Antonine dynasties. The city, its monuments, its art, its literature, bureaucracy and territorial expansion, the role of women, various social and minority groups, and the growth of Christianity will all be discussed. (Also listed as History 227.) (Not offered 2013-14).

250  Athenian Democracy. Development of democratic institutions from Solon to Pericles, their operations in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, the experiences of citizenship, legal equality, freedom, and love of country. Slavery, sexual inequality and imperialism as notable, perhaps essential features of the system. Reading from contemporary historians (Herodotus, Thucydides), theorists (Plato, Aristotle, the “Old Oligarch”), dramatists (Aeschylus, Aristophanes), political orators (Lysias and Demosthenes) and later commentary from Plutarch to the present. (Also listed as History 213.) 1 unit — Cramer

301/302 Advanced Reading in Greek.  Further exploration of ancient, medieval or modern Greek literature, done as independent reading.  Prerequisite: 201, 202. 1/2 or 1 unit each; may be taught as block, semester or year, independent or group courses.

311/312 Advanced Reading in Latin.  Further exploration of ancient or medieval Latin literature. Prerequisite: 211, 212 or consent of instructor. 1/2 or 1 unit each; may be taught as block, semester or year, independent or group courses.

322 Advanced Topics.  Independent study for advanced students with knowledge of Greek or Latin who wish to pursue specific studies in specialized areas.  1 unit - Department

401, 402-Directed Reading in Greek.  Independent study of various authors.  Prerequisite: 301, 302. 1/2 or 1 unit each; may be taught as block, semester or year courses.

411/412 Directed Reading in Latin.  Independent study of various authors.  Prerequisite: 311, 312. 1/2 or 1 unit each; may be taught as block, semester or year courses. 

431 Thesis.  Thesis subjects chosen by student and approved by department.  Senior classics, classics-history-politics and classics-English majors.  1 unit - Department


2014-15 Class List

101 Greek for Beginners                                                                                  

Introduction to the structure and vocabulary of classical Greek, with attention to those features that form the classical basis of Biblical koine and for the classical side of Greek diglossia from Hellenistic times through the 20th century. Short texts from Homer to Kazantzakis and Cavafy provide practice in literary, philosophical and rhetorical reading and initiation in major areas of Western thought. Attention to the history of the language and its relation to ancient, medieval and modern culture. Carries Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 Units—Dobson, Thakur

111 Latin for Beginners                                                                                              

Introduction to the structure of classical Latin; reading of short texts from Plautus to Milton and Newton to provide practice in literary and rhetorical reading and initiation in major areas of western thought. Attention to the history of the language and its relation to ancient, medieval and modern culture. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units — Buxton, Thakur

115 An Introduction to Classical Literature and Archaeology: Classical Freedom and Authority

Introduction to ancient Greek and Roman cultures through reading of original sources and examination of material culture. Students will be exposed to literature from various genres (such as epic, dramatic, lyric and philosophical) and consider modern ways of receiving and interpreting them. Texts include Homeric and Virgilian epic, Greek tragedy and comedy, Platonic and Epicurean philosophy, Greek and Roman historians. The second part of the course will focus on the art, architecture and topography that relate to the texts discussed in course. We will explore sites throughout Greece and the Roman Empire, and objects found therein, while examining monumental building and the use of public space. The course will offer an introduction to printed and online sources of information and to college-level writing. First-year Experience. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units – Dobson, Thakur

201 Reading in Greek                                                                                 

Introduction to Greek literature, including Homer and dramatic, philosophical or historical writing. Prerequisite: Classics 101 or consent of instructor.

.5 or 1 unit — Cramer or Dobson

202 Reading in Greek                                                                                     

Introduction to Greek literature, including Homer and dramatic, philosophical or historical writing. Prerequisite: Classics 101 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit — Dobson, Cramer

210 Greek Philosophy                                                                                             

Major writers and schools from the thousand year history of Greek philosophical research in the areas of nature, the gods, the mind, and ways of life: Ionian and Italian Pre-Socratics, Plato and the Academy, Aristotle, Pyrrho, the Cynics, the Stoa, Epicurus and Lucretius, and the revival in Late Antiquity of Pyrronian Scepticism and Platonism. Emphasis on close reading of the texts (including certain Greek terms) and on critical and comparative writing. Also listed as Philosophy 101

1 unit

211 Reading in Latin                                                                                          

Various ancient and medieval Latin works. Prerequisite: Classics 111, placement above CL111 on department placement test or consent of department. Taught together with Classics 311 and Classics 411, with adjustments for student preparation. Block 3, 2014 offering includes lyric and satiric poetry of Horace.

.5 or 1 unit —Cramer, Thakur

212 Reading in Latin                                                                                 

Various ancient and medieval Latin works. Prerequisite: CL 111, placement above CL111 on department placement test or consent of department

.5 or 1 unit — Thakur

216 Roman History I: The Ancient Roman Republic                                    

Focus on the development of Rome, from a small city ruled by kings, to a regional power ruled under a Republic. The course will trace Rome's expansion through Italy, its conflict with Carthage and will closely examine the end of the Republic. Individuals discussed will include the Gracchi, generals Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Caesar, and Rome's greatest politician (and author) Cicero. Also listed as History 216

1 unit—Thakur

218 Homer                                                                                                                    

The Iliad and Odyssey as oral traditional poems, preservers of Bronze Age and archaic lore, locus of the creation of classical Greek culture and predecessors of European epic; together with Hesiodic epic and Homeric hymns. Reading in English with attention to the formal Greek diction and the problems of translation, except that students who know Greek will read parts of the original text. Also listed as Comparative Literature 300

1 unit—Cramer

219 Greek Drama: Origins and Early Forms of Theatre                                  

A study of origins, early texts, performance practices and developing theatrical conventions in various cultures, with special emphasis on ancient Greek and Roman theatre. Also listed as Theatre 220 and Comparative Literature 200.

1 unit

220 Myth & Meaning                                                                                           

Religion and myth of ancient Greece and Rome in relation to that of the ancient Mediterranean (Akkadian, Hittite, Sumerian, Egyptian). Female presence in art, literature and religion compared to treatment of women in their respective cultures. Theoretical approaches to the understanding of myth (Comparative, Jungian, Structuralist) in relation to myths as they are encoded in their specific cultures. Students may trace a myth through Medieval, Renaissance and modern transformations in art, music, poetry and film, or study myth in other cultures (e.g. Norse and Celtic). Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques, and Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. Also listed as Comparative Literature 200, and Feminist and Gender Studies 220.

1 unit — Dobson

221 The Invention of History                                                                        

Herodotus, sometimes called the 'father of lies,' and Thucydides, sometimes called the first political scientist, treated as the first historians. Study of the ways of conceiving history and its relation to the peoples and periods explored. No Greek or Latin required. Also listed as History 302.

1 unit — Cramer

222 Topics:                                                                                                             

Courses vary from year to year, to include offerings in classical and comparative religion and mythology, history, language and literature, anthropology, archaeology and women's studies supplementary to those offered in the catalog. No Greek or Latin required.

Freedom and Empire: The Drama of Ancient Politics                                        

Examines ancient politics, from the struggle for freedom to the temptations of empire, insofar as it is vividly portrayed in Shakespeare and the classical literature of Greece and Rome: the greatness, challenges and defects of the ancient republic; the nature of political and military ambition; and the causes and character of empire. Focus/possible works: Shakespeare's Roman plays; the Socratic Xenophon's novel on the rise and rule of Cyrus the Great; Tacitus on Roman emperors. The course may also draw upon Machiavelli on Rome. Also listed as Political Science 234 and Comparative Literature 220.

1 unit

Topics in Art: The Golden Age of Greece                                                                    

Also listed as Art History 200.

1 unit

The Life of the Soul                                                                                                                   

Since the beginning of time, humans have been searching into the nature of the soul, its life and its meanings. Starting from the Greeks, this course seeks to discover how the concept of “soul” is understood, and how its life is conceived. We will explore the roots of these questions in ancient Greek epic, drama and philosophy, how these answers transform in medieval and renaissance literature, and how contemporary “soul” psychology offers strikingly new answers to them. Also listed as Philosophy 203, Comparative Literature 220, Classics 222 and Religion 200

1 unit—Dobson.

Gender and Sexuality in Antiquity                                                                                  

An introductory survey of issues relating to gender and sexuality in Greece and Rome.  The focus will be on the role of women in ancient society and their characterization in literature.  Though our sources are dominated by male perspectives, the class will attempt a balanced and accurate picture of ancient society.   The course will also place these literary depictions in the broader context of art, political and societal structure, religious belief and family relations.  Authors examined will include Hesiod, Homer, Aristophanes, Virgil, the female poets Sappho and Sulpicia, Ovid, and many more. Also listed as Feminist and Gender Studies 206 and Comparative Literature 200.

1 unit - Thakur

226 Roman History II: The Rise of the Ancient Roman Empire           

Following a brief survey of prior Roman history, the course will examine the development of the Roman state in the late first century under the emperor Augustus. The course will proceed to consider the Empire's evolution and management under subsequent Julio-Claudian, Flavian, and Antonine dynasties. The city, its monuments, its art, its literature, bureaucracy and territorial expansion, the role of women, various social and minority groups, and the growth of Christianity will all be discussed. Also listed as History 227

1 unit –Buxton

250 Athenian Democracy                                                                              

Development of democratic institutions from Solon to Pericles, their operations in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, the experiences of citizenship, legal equality, freedom, and love of country. Slavery, sexual inequality and imperialism as notable, perhaps essential features of the system. Reading from contemporary historians (Herodotus, Thucydides), theorists (Plato, Aristotle, the 'Old Oligarch'), dramatists (Aeschylus, Aristophanes), political orators (Lysias and Demosthenes) and later commentary from Plutarch to the present. Also listed as History 213.

1 unit — Buxton

301/302 Advanced Reading in Greek                                                                 

Further exploration of ancient, medieval or modern Greek literature, done as independent reading. Prerequisite: Classics 202 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit — Cramer, Dobson

311/312 Advanced Reading in Latin                                                                  

Further exploration of ancient or medieval Latin literature. Prerequisite: Classics 212 or consent of instructor. Taught together with Classics 211 and Classics 411, with adjustments for student preparation. Block 3 2014 offering includes lyric and satiric poetry of Horace.

.5 unit — Cramer, Thakur

401/402 Directed Readings in Greek                                                          

Independent study of various authors and special topics. Prerequisite: 301, 302.

.5 to 1 unit — Cramer, Dobson

411/412 Directed Readings in Latin                                                            

Independent study of various authors and special topics. Prerequisite: 311, 312 or consent of instructor. Taught with Classics 211 and Classics 311,with adjustments for student preparation. Block 3 2014 offering includes lyric and satiric poetry of Horace.

.5 unit — Cramer, Thakur

431 Thesis                                                                                                                   

Thesis subjects chosen by student and approved by department. Senior Classics, Classics-History-Politics and Classics - English majors. Prerequisite: Senior Majors Only.

1 unit — Cramer, Thakur