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Music

www.coloradocollege.edu/academics/dept/music

Professors AGEE, BEN-AMOTS (chair), M. GRACE, LEVINE, SCOTT; Assistant Professor BAÑAGALE; Artist-in-Residence S. GRACE (associate chair); Lecturer D. BRINK; Visitors SCHORMANN, JIRASEK

THE MAJOR — REQUIREMENTS:

All students who wish to major in music must complete the following seven core block courses: MU392, MU393, MU411, MU412, MU315, MU316 and either MU301 or MU399.  Two additional elective block courses must be completed from the department offerings, at least one of which is 200-level or above; one unit of MU150; one unit of any music FYE can be applied toward the major.  MU199 Pre-Theory may not be used toward the major. 

All music majors must complete an integrative capstone experience by taking MU435 Senior Seminar during their senior year. Seniors will sign up for MU401 or MU402 in preparation for the Capstone Colloquium in Block 6 of the senior year.

All music majors must complete one unit (four semesters) of vocal or instrumental studio performance. In addition, all majors are required to complete one unit (four semesters) of ensemble performance. One semester of the ensemble requirement must be World Music (Balinese gamelan or Bluegrass ensemble) taken before or during MU393.  Majors must satisfy the piano proficiency requirement as follows: all major and minor scales, one Bach two-part invention or the first movement of a classical sonatina, one Chopin prelude, and one 20th-century work of at least intermediate difficulty. This requirement should be completed no later than the beginning of the junior year. Four semesters of piano lessons at Colorado College fulfills this requirement. 

Majors must fulfill the basic music computer requirement by taking MU200 or demonstrate computer literacy through examination. The ETS Major Field Test in Music must be successfully completed in the senior year.  Music majors who plan to satisfy state teaching certification requirements should consult with the CC Education Department as early as possible in their college career.

During the academic year the department will sponsor a series of performances by faculty and student ensembles and soloists, as well as extended visits by distinguished visiting artists. Upon declaration, music majors must attend 10 such department-approved concerts per semester to broaden their understanding of the joys and challenges of the concert world and to gain a deeper understanding of performance and literature. 

Departmental distinction at graduation for seniors will be awarded on the criteria of performance in departmental courses, the senior capstone project, and participation and presence in the life of the department.

THE MINOR — REQUIREMENTS:

All students who wish to minor in music must complete six units of course work. One unit in each of the following categories:  Music Theory, for example MU199, MU200, MU301, MU392, MU399, or other department-approved course. Music History, for example MU150, MU204, MU207, MU212, MU223, MU227 or MU228, or other department-approved course. Ethnomusicology, for example MU221, MU222, MU290, MU291, MU295 or MU393.

Additional offerings are listed in the catalog of courses and should be discussed with the student’s minor advisor. Only department-approved courses can count toward the minor. Performance, four semesters of studio lessons and/or ensemble participation.  Each semester of ensemble or studio lessons earns .25 unit of credit. 

Minors must fulfill two electives. Both electives can be taken as block courses units in consultation with the student’s minor advisor.  Otherwise, it is possible to combine one block course with one unit (four semesters) of ensemble participation and/or studio lessons to fulfill the elective requirement.

During the academic year the department will sponsor a series of performances by faculty and student ensembles and soloists, as well as extended visits by distinguished visiting artists. Upon declaration, music majors must attend 5 such department-approved concerts per semester to broaden their understanding of the joys and challenges of the concert world and to gain a deeper understanding of performance and literature.

The minor advisor is usually the chair of the music department. Additional information can be obtained at the music office.

Music Courses

104 World Music

Surveys the musical cultures of eight world areas. Develops musical vocabulary and listening skills through style description and analysis. Explores relationships between music and culture through ethnographic case studies. Introduces traditional vocal and instrumental performance techniques through workshops taught by native musicians. (Fulfills only one unit of the Social Science distribution requirement.) This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

2 units

107 Percussion

.25 unit —

109 African Drum

(Not offered 2013-14).

.25 unit

111 Recorder

.25 unit —

113 Harp (1st Year)

.25 unit —

115 Banjo

.25 unit —

117 Bass Guitar

(Not offered 2013-14).

.25 unit

118 Piano

.25 unit —

120 Jazz Piano

.25 unit —

121 Class Instruction in Beginning Guitar

.25 unit —

122 Bluegrass Guitar

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

.25 unit —

123 Tuba

.25 unit —

124 Class Instruction in Piano

Small group lessons for beginners, developing basic skills in technique, tone production, and musicianship. Music fundamentals, ear-training, sight-reading, and keyboard harmony. Meets once a week.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

.25 unit —

125 Class Instruction in Voice

Students will discover aspects of good vocal production (singing, speaking) including posture, breathing, general vocal physiology, relaxation techniques, performance skills and more. For students who do not take private lessons. Individual attention given. Four to twelve students, no previous experience required. Meets once a week.

.25 unit —

126 Class instruction in Intermediate Guitar

.25 unit —

127 Jazz Bass Guitar

.25 unit —

128 Double Bass

.25 unit —

129 Jazz Guitar

.25 unit —

130 World Music Ensemble: African Music Ensemble

(Not offered 2013-14).

.25 unit

131 Balinese Gamelan Music

Also listed as Asian Studies 131.

.25 unit —

132 Bluegrass Music Ensemble

.25 unit —

133 Violin

.25 unit —

137 Classical Guitar

.25 unit —

139 Cello

.25 unit —

141 Mandolin

.25 unit —

144 Concert Band

.25 unit —

145 Chamber Orchestra

.25 unit —

146 Guitar Ensemble

Two-semester course.

.25 unit —

147 Jazz Ensemble

.25 unit —

148 Bowed Piano Ensemble

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

.25 unit —

149 Small Chamber Ensemble

.25 unit —

150 Music in Western Culture

For the non-music major. This course will examine the socio-cultural influences on music from antiquity to modern times. The music of each period will be examined in terms of its stylistic characteristics, its performance practices and its function within the society. Selected genres, composers and musical form will be studied through directed listening sessions. Special attention will be given to the aesthetic ideas that shaped the music of each period. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units —

151 Voice

.25 unit —

155 Viola

.25 unit —

157 Chamber Chorus

.25 unit —

159 College Choir

.25 unit —

161 Clarinet

.25 unit —

162 Bassoon

.25 unit —

163 French Horn

.25 unit —

164 Flute

.25 unit —

165 Oboe

.25 unit —

166 Baritone

.25 unit —

167 Trombone

.25 unit —

168 Trumpet

.25 unit —

169 Saxophone

.25 unit —

171 Organ

.25 unit —

173 Fiddle

.25 unit —

174 Tabla

.25 unit —

175 Collegium Musicum

Instrumental Ensemble and Vocal Ensemble credits (only for non-music majors) may be counted toward a degree provided the student does not have a total of more than 2 units of work in all.

.25 unit —

182 Emotion and Meaning in Music

Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

Prerequisite: First-Year Experience. Must take both blocks for credit.

1 unit —

190 Art and Music From Ancient to Modern Times: Harmony or Discord?

Examines the histories of western art and music, how the arts reflect cultural ideas and how their evolving styles and meanings seem either 'harmonious' or 'discordant' with one another. The course will cover key developments in both disciplines in antiquity, the middle ages, the Renaissance, Baroque, Romantic Impressionist, and Modern eras. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

2 units

199 Pre-Theory

Develops understanding of the basic elements of music through written and aural exercises and analysis. Rudiments of music theory involving melody, rhythm, and harmony. Concentration on notation and aural recognitions of rhythm and meter, key signatures, scales, and intervals; the construction and connection of basic triads and chords; basic keyboard and sight singing skills. Designed to assist students planning to take Theory I-IV or for students interested in gaining knowledge of the musician's basic materials and skills. Cannot be used as a credit toward the music major.

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

Also listed as Film and New Media Studies 114.

1 unit —

200 Music @ the Computer

Introduction to digital sound in all three categories of composition, orchestration and musical arrangement, with primary focus on Finale Notation Software. Work in the computer lab will explore a range of possibilities that combine digital samples, multimedia, and the Internet. Students will create their own orchestral arrangements and explore new combinations of sound and rhythm in an atmosphere of experimentation and discovery. Students will print, playback and record their own music.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Also listed as Film and New Media Studies 215.

1 unit —

201 American Music History

Overview of classical and popular traditions in American music. Draws out this music's relevance to audiences of the past and of the present. Assigned listening and readings paired with source materials (such as correspondence, diary entries, and historical reviews) selected to increase understanding of a given work or historical figure. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Music 199 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

202 Music of Cuba

An introduction to the cultural and political scene of Cuba, past and present. Through a careful examination of the classical repertoire and salon music, from the 18th to the 20th Centuries, we will explore the Danzón Music as well as the various Afro-Cuban religious groups like the Santería, Palo, Abakuá and Arará. Special attention will be given to the question of the way post-revolution Cuban society deals with nationality, race, and gender issues in the arts and how ideas of a Cuban cultural identity are remodeled by the government. Finally, the course will address questions of marketing and commercializing of contemporary Cuban music as demonstrated by the enormous success of the “Buena Vista Social Club” and other movies. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

Prerequisite: First Year Experience Course. 1st Years Only.

1 unit —

204 From Mozart to Mahler: A History of the Symphony

No previous musical experience needed. An exploration of the development of the symphony, beginning with its inception as an amalgamation of various national characteristics in courtly circles during the middle of the 18th century. Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven elaborated and transformed the genre as it moved into the 19th century, when it flourished as a dramatic vehicle for large public concerts during the great age of Romanticism. An analysis of the symphony's mid- to late-19th century manifestations will examine the continuity of its forms as well as the myriad innovations that eventually led both to the profound creations of Mahler and others as well as the ultimate decline of the genre in the 20th century.

1 unit —

205 Introduction to Jazz

Musicians, critics, and historians have struggled to define jazz for a hundred years. This introduction to the history of jazz focuses on the musical processes and cultural concerns that have come to define this genre. Emphasis on the ways that social issues such as racial segregation, discrimination and the African-American struggle for civil rights have contributed to the aesthetics and political power of jazz music. No previous experience required. Writing in the Discipline. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 200.

1 unit —

207 Opera

An introduction to operatic conventions from the origin of opera in the late Renaissance to the operatic masterworks of the 20th century. Sociological elements behind the presentation of opera will be discussed as well as concepts in staging and production.

1 unit —

209 Music at the Millenium

The significance of the Second Millennium as a collective anniversary. Some salient musical developments of the past on the rise in prominence of popular and world music in the 20th century. The state of music today with emphasis on revolutionary new technologies. Musical changes that are projected as the 21st century is entered. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

210 Splendor of the Baroque

No previous musical experience needed. A kaleidoscopic introduction to the passionate and lofty music of the late 16th, 17th, and early 18th centuries. The course examines the fascinating English developments of the late Renaissance and early Baroque, the rediscovery of ancient music and the invention of opera, the flowering of instrumental music across Europe, and the final apotheosis of the high Baroque in the dramatic spectacle of Handel and the contrapuntal genius of Bach. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

211 Miles Ahead: The Miles Davis Years

This course traces the remarkable fifty-year career of one of jazz's most important innovators. His thinking inspired several distinct stylistic movements in the music, and he was mentor to many younger players who developed into major voices under his leadership. Guided listening to several of Miles most important recordings as well as those of some of his significant proteges and investigation of some of the extra-musical issues surrounding his life and music. No prerequisite, though 205 Introduction to Jazz is recommended. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Prerequisite: Music 205 is recommended.

1 unit —

212 Mozart & His Age

A study of Mozart's life, character and works in the context of 18th century Europe. The course will examine each genre of music composed by Mozart and compare his works with those of his immediate predecessors and contemporaries such as Handel and Haydn. Mozart's place in 18th century society - his relationships with employers, contemporary musicians and works, family, friends, and the Masonic movement - will be examined as a context for the study of his music. No musical background is required.

1 unit —

214 Vocal Literature and Language

Traces the development of secular vocal music from the renaissance to the 20th century with a special focus on Lieder and melodie. The International Phonetic Alphabet (I.P.A.)-a vital system which identifies each individual sound in speech-will serve as the foundation for learning the pronunciation of the four dominant languages in this repertoire--German, French, Italian and English. Students will gain the essential knowledge of vocal repertoire and pronunciation necessary for enhancing their appreciation of vocal art, their own performance practice, and their ongoing music and/or language studies. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

217 Musical Learning Theories for Band and Orchestral Instruments

In this course, students study various approaches for teaching instrumental music (e.g.: Orff, Kodaly, Suzuki, Dalcroze, etc.) while they acquire intermediate performance skills on two band or orchestral instruments. By engaging in various music learning theories, students discover how to best teach someone to play an instrument, in the context of school, private lesson, and informal settings. Students will explore how sound is produced, which motor and aural skills enhance playing an instrument, and what teaching methods improve instruction and learning. After practice, observation, and teaching others, the course culminates with solo and small ensemble performances. Required for K-12 music teaching licensure candidates.

Prerequisite: pre-theory music reading and consent of instructor.

Also listed as Education 217.

1 unit —

221 Topics in Ethnomusicology:

Special topics in ethnomusicology, approached through emphasis on a particular musical area, theoretical issue, genre or repertory, compositional technique, or instrument. The course is devoted to non-Western musical cultures. Meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.

Also listed as Art History 113 and Asian Studies 200.

1 unit —

222 Topics in Ethnomusicology:

Special topics in ethnomusicology, approached through emphasis on a particular musical area, theoretical issue, genre or repertory, compositional technique, or instrument. The course is devoted to non-Western musical cultures. Meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

223 Beethoven, or 'Da-Da-Da-DUMMM'

' An exploration of the life and music of Ludwig van Beethoven (1771-1827). The course will begin with an overview of Beethoven's artistic inheritance from Haydn and Mozart, particularly in regard to symphonies, piano sonatas and concertos, string quartets, music for the stage, and sacred music. The powerful and daring works of Beethoven's middle period, the time of his increasing deafness, proved a challenge to this inheritance, and these compositions dominated the aesthetic concerns of the most important Western composers who followed Beethoven in the nineteenth century. The transcendental, reflective, and even puzzling works that Beethoven created in his last years - while his behavior was becoming more erratic and disturbing - were not fully appreciated by his contemporaries and immediate successors. Indeed, their artistic value and influence were not generally acknowledged until the twentieth century. This course will focus on the musical and biographical considerations that can be used to describe Beethoven as a Viennese Classical, Romantic, and post-Romantic figure, as well as his role in forming the modern concept of the performing artists and composer. No musical background is required.

1 unit —

224 Jewish Music

This interdisciplinary course traces the many musical traditions of the Jewish world communities in a journey from Temple singing and desert ceremonies in biblical times, through music of Mendelssohn, Mahler, and Schoenberg, to works of individuals such as Gershwin, Copland, Berlin, and Bernstein. Included will be a comparative study of the three major religions of the Western world exploring their respective voices and musical interaction. Sociology, literature, religion and history, as well as issues of ethnicity, cultural unity and self-expression, will be engaged in this multicultural search for musical identity. (Also listed as Religion 224.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

226 Verdi and Wagner

Examines the works of the two greatest opera composers of the nineteenth century: the Italian Giuseppe Verdi and the German Richard Wagner, both born in 1813. The course begins by examining the origins of opera in the Italian renaissance and its development through the baroque and Viennese classical periods as opera spread and developed its own national characteristics in French and German-speaking lands. Italian, German, and French influences during the early romantic period then shaped both artists' output as each developed distinctive and indeed revolutionary styles. The course work includes viewing 12 complete operas, including Verdi's 'Romantic Trilogy,' (Rigoletto, La traviata, and Il trovatore) and Wagner's massive tetralogy The Ring of the Nibelung. The course concludes with the late comedies -- Wagner's Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg and Verdi's Falstaff. No previous musical experience required.

1 unit —

227 Topics in Music:

Particular aspects in music, approached through emphasis on a form, period, composer(s), area or medium. Blocks 1-8: Vocal Literature and Language. This course provides vocal students with a broad view of classic vocal literature from many languages, countries and areas. It provides the tools for pronunciation in foreign languages through teaching the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to pronounce and sing vocal literature. Taught as an extended format course and must be taken for a full year.

Also listed as Film and New Media Studies 200.

1 unit —

228 Topics in Music: Introduction to Basic Jazz Theory

Also listed as Comparative Literature 200 and Feminist & Gender Studies 206 and Film and New Media Studies 200 and German 320.

.5 or 1 unit —

230 Women in Music

This course examines the interaction of women's musical lives with politics, society, and spirituality, and will focus primarily on the twentieth century. We will look at artists like Aretha Franklin and South Africa's Miriam Makeba and their relationship to the Civil Rights struggles in their countries; Joni Mitchell, Holly Near, punk rocker Patti Smith, and performance artist Laurie Anderson and their relationship to the feminist movement; Mary Lou Williams Billie Holiday, Bessie Smith and the integration of women into jazz; Joan Tower, Marin Alsop, Maria Callas, Marian Anderson and the traditions of Western Classical Music; and the role of the ingenue and character roles in the Broadway musical - from Rodgers and Hammerstein to Stephen Sondheim. In addition to twentieth century women, we will also review the lives of women frame drummers of earliest history, as well as the seminal figures Amy Beach, Clara Schumann, and the mystic visionary Hildegard von Bingen. Women's diaries and oral histories will be a major source for the class, as well as video and extensive listening to recordings. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

231 Performing Music, Performing Gender

How do musical experiences help define gender roles and sexuality? These experiences are examined across a wide range of musical genres and cultural contexts. How might gender and sexual identity be shaped, for example, by writing the biography of a homosexual classical composer, joining a community of heavy metal fans, singing as an Italian castrato, or a 19th-century Indian courtesan, impersonating Elvis? Theoretical approaches drawn from feminist studies, gender and sexuality studies, and queer theory. (Not offered 2013-14).

.25 to 1 unit

232 Popular Music from South Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa

Explores popular music from South Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa, as well as from these regions' diasporic populations in the United States and Europe. Considers how technology, mass media, and migration have shaped and still shape communities' respective cultural identities, particularly in the contemporary context of globalization. (Not offered 2013-14).

.25 to 1 unit

233 From Bombay to Bollywood: Music and the Popular Indian Film

Examines how film music has helped define the global industry now known as 'Bollywood.' Also examines how film song sequences, hallmarks of Indian popular cinema, work within and outside films' narratives to create a unique aesthetic. Course surveys both old and recent popular Bombay films. It explores elements of songs within the film including stylistic conventions, context within films, and their life outside the cinema hall. (Not offered 2013-14).

.25 to 1 unit

290 American Indian Music

Explores American Indian history, culture, society, religion, ritual, aesthetic expression, and contemporary issues through the domain of music. Develops ability to identify, describe, and analyze various American Indian music; considers diverse styles and performance contexts. Addresses traditional as well as new music. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

291 Southwest American Indian Music

Music and culture of Southwest American Indians, with emphasis on Pueblo and Athabascan peoples. Considers origin narratives, cosmology, ritual drama, dance, and other aesthetic modes as related to Southwest Indian musical performance. Addresses traditional as well as new music. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Southwest Studies 291.

1 unit —

295 Indonesian Music

Surveys Indonesian history, culture, society, religion, and aesthetic values through music. Students become familiar with a variety of Indonesian musical repertories, styles, and performance contexts, including court traditions of Java, Sunda, and Bali and village traditions throughout the Indonesian archipelago. Traditional as well as new music is discussed. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

Also listed as Asian Studies 295.

1 unit —

301 Composition

Practical guidance in the composition of original music, with reference to 20th century music theory and compositional methods. Students will be able to concentrate on both the creative and the analytical aspects of contemporary composition.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit —

302 Orchestration

(Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit

315 Music History I

Music of the Ancient World, Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque. Forms, techniques, media, and aesthetic elements as fundamentals of style. An examination of music and music theory from classical antiquity through the middle of the 18th century, including the diffusion of early Christian chant, the rise of mainstream sacred polyphony in Paris during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the spread of sacred and secular forms during the late Middle Ages, the influence of English style on the French-Flemish composers who would dominate sacred musical style in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the appearance of important Italian composers in the late Renaissance, the national manifestations of Renaissance and early Baroque secular forms, and the international High Baroque style of Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, and Rameau. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & 199. Music 315 & 316 TOGETHER equals 'W' credit.

1 unit —

316 Music History II

Music of the Classical and Romantic periods, and the 20th century until 1945. Forms, techniques, media, and aesthetic elements as foundations of style. Music of the Classical era concentrating on the works of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven, studied in the context of the age of Enlightenment and the freedom of the composer from patronage systems. The emergence of a romantic ideal in 19th century music with special focus on Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Berlioz, Brahms, Verdi, Wagner, nationalistic composers in Russia, and Mahler. The languages of 20th-century music as a part of rapid cultural change including the music of Debussy, Stravinsky, Schonberg, Webern, Berg, and Bartok. Note: Music History I and II do not have to be taken in sequence and credit is given for each course completed. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & 199. Music 315 & Music 316 TOGETHER equals 'W' credit.

1 unit —

325 Conducting (Choral)

Basic conducting and rehearsal techniques; interpretation in light of performance practices of various historical periods. Some outside reading required. Taught as an extended format course and must be taken for a full year. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit

329 Class Instruction in Voice

(Not offered 2013-14).

.25 unit

330 Class Instruction in Voice

(Not offered 2013-14).

.25 unit

342 Music Education in the Elementary Grades

(Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: consent of instructor (extended format).

.5 to 1 unit

392 Theory I Introduction to Counterpoint and Diatonic Harmony

Approaches to traditional harmonic practice and the music of the Common-Practice Period; keyboard harmony, ear-training and sight-singing. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Prerequisite: Music 391.

1 unit —

393 Comparative Music Theory

Explores musical thought and process in non-Western cultures, with emphasis on Native North America, Indonesia, and India; traditional notation and sight-singing systems, ear-training, melodic and rhythmic dictation, formal analysis. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

Prerequisite: Music 392.

1 unit —

394 Methods and Research in Popular Music

An interdisciplinary examination of methods and theoretical approaches in popular music research. Surveys current debates and issues within the field including music analysis, historiography, audiences and reception, race and ethnicity, identity, performance, gender and sexuality, technology, industry, politics and media. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Music 392 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

397 Advanced Topics in Music

Particular topics in music that require a more advanced background in music theory and history. Specific offerings vary from year to year and focus on periods, composers, areas, or mediums that are not otherwise offered through the regular curriculum

Prerequisite: Music 392 or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

398 Advanced Topics in Music

Particular topics in music that require a more advanced background in music theory and history. Specific offerings vary from year to year and focus on periods, composers, areas, or mediums that are not otherwise offered through the regular curriculum (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Music 392 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

399 Experimental Music

Study and practical work in the 'American Experimental Tradition' of Ives, Cowell, Cage, Partch and Young, and their international contemporaries and disciples. Primary focus on the development of new acoustic sound sources, including extended instrumental and vocal techniques, instrument design and building. Some attention also to compositional and performance issues.

Prerequisite: Music 150 or 392.

Also listed as Film and New Media Studies 312.

1 unit —

401 Readings in Music:

Specialized concentration in fields appropriate to the needs of the individual student, under the direction of the music faculty. May be taken by non-music majors.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit —

402 Readings in Music: Advanced

Specialized concentration in fields appropriate to the needs of the individual student, under the direction of the music faculty. May be taken by non-music majors.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit —

411 Theory ll Advanced Diatonic Harmony

Expanded harmonic practice and introduction to the elements of formal analysis; keyboard harmony, ear-training, and sight-singing.

Prerequisite: Music 392.

1 unit —

412 Theory III Chromatic Harmony

Harmonic practices of the late 19th century; elementary instrumentation and score-reading; keyboard harmony, ear-training, and sight-singing.

Prerequisite: Music 411.

1 unit —

425 Advanced Composition and Orchestration

This advanced course combines the study of the ranges, capabilities, and characteristics of orchestral instruments with practical guidance in the composition of original music. Examines orchestration techniques with emphasis on the historical evolution of the orchestra, starting with the Baroque era and its basso continuo, through Classical, Romantic, and 20th-century orchestration techniques.

Prerequisite: Music 301 or Consent of Instructor.

1 unit —

430 Colloquium in Music

Independent research in an advanced musical subject chosen by the student and approved by a faculty project adviser and the department. The project must involve a written component (words and/or notes) and lead to a colloquium (1/2 to 1 hour in length) presented by the student to the department faculty and other majors. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: consent of department & Senior Music majors.

.5 to 1 unit

435 Senior Seminar

Planning and preparation for the senior capstone project in music. Research proposal, design, and bibliography for capstone project, incremental presentations of work in progress, and final departmental presentation in a colloquium format. Required of all music majors in their senior year.

Prerequisite: consent of department.

1 unit —