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Classics-History-Politics

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Advisors — Professors CRAMER, FULLER, NEEL

Major Requirements

The classics–history–politics major offers students interested in the Western intellectual tradition the opportunity for multidisciplinary study supported by training in languages central to that tradition. It culminates in a senior thesis requiring students each to address a major problem in the history of ideas in its historical context. The CHP major is highly flexible, allowing students to fulfill its requirements through varied options within the respective departments. Individuals’ programs, however, must be carefully chosen in consultation with CHP staff so that courses within the constituent disciplines form an integrated whole fully supportive of their eventual senior projects. 

All students opting for this major will complete an array of courses establishing their familiarity with the major political, social and intellectual developments of the Mediterranean and Europe from antiquity to the contemporary world. Further, all will explore the Western tradition’s ways of interpreting its past by attention to both classical and subsequent models. Students’ historical and historiographical coursework will be distributed among the three constituent departments. Meanwhile, they will develop skills in at least one classical and one modern language to the point that they are able to use each in independent reading and research. Declared CHP majors in all undergraduate years will participate in an informal seminar meeting once a block, in which they establish intellectual community with their peers and advisers in discussion of significant texts outside their course material.

Finally, all CHP majors will complete substantial projects of research and criticism integrative of their experience throughout this program; their respective theses will be enriched by consideration of the primary sources in which they are based in the original languages, where possible.

Students may choose as primary advisers for their respective thesis projects any faculty members in a constituent department; other members of the college faculty may be invited to consult on or advise theses by student petition and approval of the CHP staff. One of the major’s core advisers, however, will always serve as first or second reader of thesis work, and advisory faculty will annually approve and, as appropriate, grant honors for all theses in classics–history–politics. 

REQUIREMENTS — Entry (2 units):

Students may enter the major by fulfillment of the college’s “West in Time” requirement by courses in classics, political science, history, or the cognate disciplines of art history, philosophy, or religion.

Ancient and modern language (to level of proficiency as individually determined by CHP faculty).

Normally, language proficiency will be understood to be the ability to read and respond to literary, historical, and philosophical works in either classical Greek or Latin (or, if appropriate to students’ interests, Hebrew or Arabic) and a modern European language.

History of ideas (6 units):

Students’ historical requirement will regularly be fulfilled by the completion of at least one unit in each of four periods (antiquity, Middle Ages and Renaissance, modernity, and the contemporary world), including at least two units of political science. Because suitable political science courses frequently address multiple historical periods, students will consult with their advisers about the appropriateness of particular syllabi to the respective period requirements, sometimes fulfilling two historical requirements with paired, parallel political theory courses. Although students may petition to substitute courses omitted below — for instance topics courses of special interest — for elements among the core CHP offerings, the following list will optimally support their development through the program:

I. Antiquity: History 213/Classics 250 Greek Foundations/Athenian Democracy, Classics/History 216 Roman History I, Classics 226 Roman History II, Classics 222/Political Science 234 Freedom and Empire: The Drama of Ancient Politics.

II. Middle Ages and Renaissance: History 274 The Middle Ages: The Making of Europe, History 275 Renaissance and Reformation: Crisis and Dissent, History 312 Faith, Reason, and Medieval Society. 

III.  Modern Period: History 252 Origins of Modern Science, History 277 Early Modern Europe, History 278 Europe from 1789–1848, History 287 Enlightenment Culture, History 288 Intellectual History of Modern Europe, Political Science 205 Foundations of Political Economy, Political Science 246 Politics in Literature, Political Science 292 American Political Thought, Political Science 270 Liberty and Equality.

IV. Contemporary Period: History 280 20th-Century Europe, Political Science 203/Studies in Film 205: Topics—Politics in Film, Political Science 242 Conservatism and Liberalism, Political Science 372 Political Thought Since Nietzsche.

The following courses are or may be also appropriate to the major, and may be used to fulfill requirements in one or more of the respective chronological categories, depending on a given year’s syllabus, by permission of the respective instructors and the CHP advisers: History 200 Topics and 209 Topics in Ancient History, History 410 Advanced Seminar, Political Science 298 What Is Political Philosophy?, Political Science 344 Realism and Idealism in Political Philosophy, Political Science 408 Tutorial in Political Theory, Political Science 419 Seminar in Political Philosophy.

Theory of History (2 units):

Students may fulfill the historiographical requirement by completing both Classics 221/History 302 (Invention of History) and any of the following history or political science courses treating the tradition of historical analysis: History 399 Studying History, or Political Science 303 The Uses of the Past, offered as an independent study or summer readings course by Professor Fuller or Neel.

Major Seminar:

The seminar meets regularly throughout the academic year. It may offer presentations by CHP faculty and students or their guests, as well as common readings and discussions. Although the seminar offers no credit, regular participation will be considered part of the major’s requirements.

Senior Thesis (2 units):

Declared majors must submit well-developed thesis proposals to the CHP advisory group by the end of the junior year. Their two-block thesis requirement must be completed by Block 7 of the senior year, and may be designated on their transcript by the appropriate course number in the adviser’s discipline: Classics 322 or 401, 402, 411, 412 and 431; History 409 and 415; or Political Science 402 and 450.

Courses

Classics

CL101 Greek for Beginners

Introduction to the structure and vocabulary of classical Greek, with attention to those features that form the classical basis of Biblical koine and for the classical side of Greek diglossia from Hellenistic times through the 20th century. Short texts from Homer to Kazantzakis and Cavafy provide practice in literary, philosophical and rhetorical reading and initiation in major areas of Western thought. Attention to the history of the language and its relation to ancient, medieval and modern culture. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units —

CL111 Latin for Beginners

Introduction to the structure of classical Latin; reading of short texts from Plautus to Milton and Newton to provide practice in literary and rhetorical reading and initiation in major areas of western thought. Attention to the history of the language and its relation to ancient, medieval and modern culture. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

1 or 2 units —

CL114 Goddesses, Heroes, Sages and Statesmen: An Introduction to Greece and Rome

An introduction to ancient Greek and Roman cultures through readings of original sources and some study of the original languages. How human beings conceived the order of nature and culture and the sacred and secular in these periods constitutes the common inheritance of Western culture and predisposes views of self and individual in contemporary Western thought. Emphasis on how these cultures understood the destructive and creative powers of chaos and what forms of order they thought best for human beings. Block 1 will include selections from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Hesiod's Theogony, the Presocratics, the ancient Greek dramatists Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, Aristotle's Poetics and Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus. Block 2 will include selections from the statesmen Cicero and Caesar, the historian Sallust and Livy, and lyric and epic poetry of Lucretius, Catullus, Vergil, Horace and Ovid. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: First Year Experience Course, Freshmen Only.

1 to 2 units

CL116 Greek History and Philosophy: Origins of Western Culture

Aegean and Greek archaeological, historical, literary and philosophical texts, with emphasis on ideas formative of Western culture. The development and transformations of these ideas as reflected in selected texts from the early Christian era, the Enlightenment, and the Modern Age. We concentrate on concepts of what it means to be human, and the relation of individuals to community, nature, and the divine in such authors as Homer, Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Dante, Descartes, Goethe, Nietzsche, and Heidegger (Also listed as History 116 and Philosophy 116.) (Not offered 2013-14).

2 units

CL121 Intensive Latin Grammar Review and Reading Practice

Intensive Latin Grammar Review and Reading Practice. This course will use a morphological and syntactic approach to review and practice the essential structures and concepts of Latin grammar. It is intended to prepare students for courses at the 200 level.

.5 or 1 unit —

CL125 Ancient Multicultures

Survey of ancient history as an arena of cultural contact between different ethnic, religious and cultural communities. Emphasis on the Persian Empire as 'other' to Greeks and Jews, on Alexandria as a 'melting pot' or 'salad bowl,' and on the Greco-Roman society of later antiquity as locus of changing identities. Mixed and dialogical cultural forms such as History, New Comedy, Pastoral, Apocalypse, Romance, Acts, and Gospel. Reading selected from Herodotus, the Bible, Plautus, Theocritus, Polybius, Vergil, Caesar Augustus, Philo and Petronius.

Also listed as History 209.

1 unit —

CL141 Sanskrit

Starting with exercises for students with little or no experience in Sanskrit, a sequence of courses in basic reading and pronunciation skills (emphasizing Sanskrit's unique euphonic system), increasingly complex grammatical forms and structures, strong focus on in-class oral recitation from memory, vocabulary building, grammar and translation, culminating in independent translations of selected primary source material. (Not offered 2013-14).

.5 unit

CL142 Sanskrit

Starting with exercises for students with little or no experience in Sanskrit, a sequence of courses in basic reading and pronunciation skills (emphasizing Sanskrit's unique euphonic system), increasingly complex grammatical forms and structures, strong focus on in-class oral recitation from memory, vocabulary building, grammar and translation, culminating in independent translations of selected primary source material. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Classics 141.

.5 unit

CL143 Sanskrit

Starting with exercises for students with little or no experience in Sanskrit, a sequence of courses in basic reading and pronunciation skills (emphasizing Sanskrit's unique euphonic system), increasingly complex grammatical forms and structures, strong focus on in-class oral recitation from memory, vocabulary building, grammar and translation, culminating in independent translations of selected primary source material. (Not offered 2013-14).

.5 unit

CL144 Sanskrit

Starting with exercises for students with little or no experience in Sanskrit, a sequence of courses in basic reading and pronunciation skills (emphasizing Sanskrit's unique euphonic system), increasingly complex grammatical forms and structures, strong focus on in-class oral recitation from memory, vocabulary building, grammar and translation, culminating in independent translations of selected primary source material. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Classics 143.

.5 unit

CL201 Reading in Greek:

Introduction to Greek literature, including Homer and dramatic, philosophical or historical writing.

Prerequisite: Classics 101 or consent of instructor.

.5 or 1 unit —

CL202 Reading in Greek:

Introduction to Greek literature, including Homer and dramatic, philosophical or historical writing.

Prerequisite: Classics 101 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit —

CL209 Late Antiquity

Continuity and change from Roman antiquity to the Christian Middle Ages in the art and architecture of Mediterranean lands (200-600 A. D.). The 'decline' of Rome and the development of Christian imagery will be studied through art, archaeological sites, and texts-writings from the time as well as later historians.

Prerequisite: Art History 111, 112 or consent of instructor.

Also listed as Art History 209.

1 unit —

CL210 Greek Philosophy

Major writers and schools from the thousand year history of Greek philosophical research in the areas of nature, the gods, the mind, and ways of life: Ionian and Italian Pre-Socratics, Plato and the Academy, Aristotle, Pyrrho, the Cynics, the Stoa, Epicurus and Lucretius, and the revival in Late Antiquity of Pyrronian Scepticism and Platonism. Emphasis on close reading of the texts (including certain Greek terms) and on critical and comparative writing.

Also listed as Philosophy 101.

1 unit —

CL211 Reading in Latin:

Various ancient and medieval Latin works.

Prerequisite: Classics 111 or 2 yrs HS Latin. or consent of instructor.

.5 unit —

CL212 Reading in Latin:

Various ancient and medieval Latin works.

Prerequisite: Classics 211: 111 or 2yrs HS Latin. Classics 311: 212. Classics 411: 311,312. All are 'or consent of instructor'.

.5 unit —

CL216 Roman History I: The Ancient Roman Republic

Focus on the development of Rome, from a small city ruled by kings, to a regional power ruled under a Republic. The course will trace Rome's expansion through Italy, its conflict with Carthage and will closely examine the end of the Republic. Individuals discussed will include the Gracchi, generals Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Caesar, and Rome's greatest politician (and author) Cicero. (Also listed as History 216.) (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

CL218 Homer

The Iliad and Odyssey as oral traditional poems, preservers of Bronze Age and archaic lore, locus of the creation of classical Greek culture and predecessors of European epic; together with Hesiodic epic and Homeric hymns. Reading in English with attention to the formal Greek diction and the problems of translation, except that students who know Greek will read parts of the original text. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

CL219 Greek Drama: Origins and Early Forms of Theater

A study of origins, early texts, performance practices and developing theatrical conventions in various cultures, with special emphasis on ancient Greek and Roman theatre.

Also listed as Comparative Literature 200 and Comparative Literature 352 and Theatre 220.

1 unit —

CL220 Myth & Meaning

Religion and myth of ancient Greece and Rome in relation to that of the ancient Mediterranean (Akkadian, Hittite, Sumerian, Egyptian). Female presence in art, literature and religion compared to treatment of women in their respective cultures. Theoretical approaches to the understanding of myth (Comparative, Jungian, Structuralist) in relation to myths as they are encoded in their specific cultures. Students may trace a myth through Medieval, Renaissance and modern transformations in art, music, poetry and film, or study myth in other cultures (e.g. Norse and Celtic). Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Comparative Literature 200 and Feminist & Gender Studies 220.

1 unit —

CL221 The Invention of History

Herodotus, sometimes called the 'father of lies,' and Thucydides, sometimes called the first political scientist, treated as the first historians. Study of the ways of conceiving history and its relation to the peoples and periods explored. No Greek or Latin required.

Also listed as History 302.

1 unit —

CL222 Topics:

Courses vary from year to year, to include offerings in classical and comparative religion and mythology, history, language and literature, anthropology, archaeology and women's studies supplementary to those offered in the catalog. No Greek or Latin required.

Also listed as Comparative Literature 200 and Race and Ethnic Studies 200 and History 209.

1 unit —

CL223 Art of Greece & Rome

Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. The development of Greek art from Geometric to Hellenistic with emphasis on the classical monuments of Athens. Etruscan art. Survey of Roman art from its origins to the late empire with emphasis on the imperial monuments and topography of Rome. Art of the mystery cults and early Christianity.

Also listed as Art History 207.

1 unit —

CL226 Roman History II: The Rise of the Ancient Roman Empire

Following a brief survey of prior Roman history, the course will examine the development of the Roman state in the late first century under the emperor Augustus. The course will proceed to consider the Empire's evolution and management under subsequent Julio-Claudian, Flavian, and Antonine dynasties. The city, its monuments, its art, its literature, bureaucracy and territorial expansion, the role of women, various social and minority groups, and the growth of Christianity will all be discussed. (Also listed as History 227.) (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

CL250 Athenian Democracy

Development of democratic institutions from Solon to Pericles, their operations in the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, the experiences of citizenship, legal equality, freedom, and love of country. Slavery, sexual inequality and imperialism as notable, perhaps essential features of the system. Reading from contemporary historians (Herodotus, Thucydides), theorists (Plato, Aristotle, the 'Old Oligarch'), dramatists (Aeschylus, Aristophanes), political orators (Lysias and Demosthenes) and later commentary from Plutarch to the present.

Also listed as History 213.

1 unit —

CL301 Advanced Reading in Greek:

Further exploration of ancient, medieval or modern Greek literature, done as independent reading.

Prerequisite: Classics 202 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit —

CL302 Advanced Reading in Greek:

Further exploration of ancient, medieval or modern Greek literature, done as independent reading.

Prerequisite: Classics 202 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit —

CL311 Advanced Reading in Latin:

Further exploration of ancient or medieval Latin literature.

Prerequisite: Classics 212 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit —

CL312 Advanced Reading in Latin:

Further exploration of ancient or medieval Latin literature.

Prerequisite: Classics 212.

.5 unit —

CL322 Advanced Topics:

Study for advanced students in the languages, arts, drama and literature.

1 unit —

CL401 Directed Readings in Greek:

Independent study of various authors and special topics.

Prerequisite: 301, 302.

.5 unit —

CL402 Directed Readings in Greek:

Independent study of various authors and special topics.

Prerequisite: 301, 302.

.5 unit —

CL411 Directed Readings in Latin:

Independent study of various authors and special topics.

Prerequisite: 311, 312 or consent of instructor.

.5 unit —

CL412 Directed Readings in Latin:

Independent study of various authors and special topics.

Prerequisite: 311, 312.

.5 unit —

CL431 Thesis

Thesis subjects chosen by student and approved by department. Senior Classics, Classics-History-Politics and Classics - English majors.

Prerequisite: Senior Majors Only.

1 unit —

History

HY104 Culture, Society & History

An introductory survey of human culture and society through the comparison of Europe and one other major area of the world from ancient to the modern period, focusing on fundamental topics in the development of world civilizations, including material culture, political organization, and aesthetics. The course will emphasize critical moments in historical development, thematic connections, and primary textual and visual sources. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units —

HY105 Civilization in the West

Western civilization from ancient to modern times. Cultural, social, and political developments that shaped the modern world. The department offers this course in sections designated Europe or Atlantic World. Atlantic World includes the study of the heritage of Western civilization in the Western hemisphere. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units —

HY109 Civilization in East Asia

East Asian civilization from ancient to modern times. Cultural, social and political developments that shaped East Asian nations and their place in the modern world. Introduces basics of historical method: contextualization, analysis, and critical evaluation of primary sources and their significance. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 2 units

HY110 Historical Studies: (With Emphasis on Writing)

An introduction to history through the study of a special aspect in depth. (Topics to be designated according to the specialties of the faculty.) (Not open to seniors). (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: 1st or 2nd year standing or consent of instructor.

1 unit

HY114 Goddesses, Heroes, Sages and Statesmen: An Introduction to

(Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: First Year Experience Course, Freshmen Only.

1 to 2 units

HY116 Greek History and Philosophy

Aegean and Greek archeological, historical, literary, and philosophical texts, with emphasis on those ideas formative in shaping Western culture. The development and transformations of these ideas as reflected in selected texts from the early Christian era, the Enlightenment or the Modern Age. The rise of individualism and its conflicts with community, ritual relationships to nature vs. separation and exploitation, the relation of theology to the ordering of experience, and how psyche both forms and is formed by its relationships to community, nature, and god(s). Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 2 units

HY120 The American Past

Two block course that introduces the full sweep of American History from its pre-contact, 'New World' beginnings to the recent past. Students will experience how history is made, understood, revised, and debated. Themes include cultural encounters and adaptation complexities of ethnicity and immigration; movement; the success and failures of republican ideology, capitalism, individualism and community; and the formation of American cultures. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units —

HY130 The Reinvention of the Greeks: Identity, Empire and Diaspora

Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: First Year Experience Course. 1st Years Only.

2 units

HY131 Civilization in the Middle East

Examines large-scale social structures and the question of 'ordinary' men and women from the seventh century C.E. to the present. Through a range of historical approaches-cultural, intellectual, political and social-and an emphasis on close reading of primary materials, students explore in what ways the histories of Islamic Civilization, Western Civilization, African Civilization, and Central Asian Civilization were connected histories and how people in the Middle East have critiqued their own societies and those of their contemporaries. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 2 units

HY200 Topics in History:

Selected topics in the study of history. Specific content and emphasis to be determined by the instructor.

Also listed as Art History 275 and Feminist & Gender Studies 206 and Feminist & Gender Studies 308 and Asian Studies 250 and Asian Studies 290 and Philosophy 303 and Southwest Studies 200.

.5 or 1 unit —

HY209 Topics in Ancient History:

Detailed study of a period (such as the end of the Roman Republic or Periclean Athens) or a theme (such as slavery or the rise and fall of the middle class) in Greek and/or Roman history. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.

Also listed as Classics 125 and Classics 222 and Race and Ethnic Studies 200.

1 unit —

HY210 History of Native America

Introduces students to the history of native peoples primarily in North America. The course includes histories of individual native groups as well as the relationship between American Indians and a variety of Europeans from before contact until the present. Examines a variety of primary and secondary materials to see patterns in the ways that Native Americans have been affected by the process of conquest, the ways in which Anglo-Europeans have responded to Native Americans, and in the ways in which American Indians have become a part of and remained apart from 'mainstream' American culture. As a broader goal, we also look at the way 'history' is made, understood, and used by very different cultural traditions. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 200 and Southwest Studies 214.

1 unit —

HY211 Crime & Punishment

This course explores the ways the state, church, and the people dealt with crime and viewed justice in Renaissance, early modern, and modern Europe. Attention to topics such as heresy, the witch craze, and treason and to what ordinary and great trials reveal about changing attitudes toward criminal justice.

1 unit —

HY212 American Environmental History

A survey of American history from the perspective of the environment, beginning with the biological and cultural invasion of the New World in 1492 and ending with current environmental problems and their historical roots. Topics include Native American vs. Euro-American views of nature, the impact of changing economic systems on the environment, and the impact of the landscape on various American cultures. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY213 Foundations of Classical Culture

Athenian Democracy. The Greeks with Near Eastern and Indo-European background. Panhellenic epic and religion, the polis, philosophy, history, tragedy and comedy. Attention throughout to Greek and Latin literary forms, but no knowledge of ancient languages required.

Prerequisite: Completion of CP:W required.

Also listed as Classics 250.

1 unit —

HY216 Roman History I: The Ancient Roman Republic

Focus on the development of Rome, from a small city ruled by kings, to a regional power ruled under a Republic. The course will trace Rome's expansion through Italy, its conflict with Carthage and will closely examine the end of the Republic. Individuals discussed will include the Gracchi, generals Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Caesar, and Rome's greatest politician (and author) Cicero. (Also listed as Classics 216.) (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Completion of AP:A required.

1 unit

HY217 American Frontiers

The process of conquering the American continent from 1492 to the present. An examination of the variety of forms that Euro-American conquest took (exploration, religion, economic development, settlement, and military encounter), the impact of conquest on native peoples, the social and economic development of the frontiers, and the lives that people led and lead in places considered frontiers. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY218 Eastern Europe, Russia, and Eurasia

This two-block course will survey the history of the Eurasian region from Eastern Europe to the Central Asian and Pacific areas of Eurasia, with an important theme being the rise and fall of the Russian Empire, and the rise and fall of the Soviet bloc. The focus throughout will be on the ways in which religious, cultural, and ethnic identities were shaped by, accommodated to, and resisted the construction of national boundaries and identities. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 2 units

HY221 Africa & Europe to 1919

Traditional African states, Portugal and Africa, the slave trade, European conquest, occupation and administration. The African response to the European presence in terms of social change, the origins of a 'Europeanized' African elite and the beginnings of modern African politics. - Blasenheim,. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

1 unit —

HY222 The Emergence of Modern Africa, 1885 to the Present

Africa and the Berlin Conference, primary and secondary resistance to European colonialism, political independence, conflicts between traditional and modern cultural patterns and ideologies, one-party rule and economic dependence. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY223 China in the Age of Confucius

Examines the origins of Chinese civilization, from the divination rituals of the theocratic Bronze Age Shang Dynasty to the mighty Han. Considers the great religious and philosophical traditions of China's axial age: Confucianism, Daoism, and others vying for influence in China's bloody 'Warring States' period. Students will understand the political, economic, cultural and spiritual patterns that gave shape to classical Chinese civilization. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Asian Studies 217.

1 unit —

HY224 Survey in Latin American History

Latin American history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Emphasis on colonial Mexico and Peru, the centers of Spanish power in the New World, and the political and social development of post-independence Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

Prerequisite: Will not fulfill both Critical Perspective requirements! Will be CP:D or CP:W.

2 units —

HY225 20th Century China

This course will follow the turbulent history and politics of China from the Boxer Rebellion of 1900 through the post-Mao reforms. Using primary documents, personal accounts, and scholarly studies, students will assess China's political and cultural changes and continuities in historical context. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Asian Studies 229.

1 unit —

HY226 20th Century Japan

This course will trace the social, political, and cultural developments in Japan from the first Parliamentary elections in 1890 to the current fiscal crisis in the 1990s. Using a wide range of sources, students will explore major themes in Japan's empire, World War, economic miracle, and troubled role as Asian leader. Major themes will include cross-cultural contact, world systems, and women's history. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Asian Studies 230.

1 unit —

HY227 Roman History II: The Rise of the Ancient Roman Empire

Following a brief survey of prior Roman history, the course will examine the development of the Roman state in the late first century under the emperor Augustus. The course will proceed to consider the Empire's evolution and management under subsequent Julio-Claudian, Flavian, and Antonine dynasties. The city, its monuments, its art, its literature, bureaucracy and territorial expansion, the role of women, various social and minority groups, and the growth of Christianity will all be discussed. (Also listed as Classics 226.) (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY231 Women in America before the Civil War

Women in American society, from colonial times to 1860, including issues of race, class and servitude; transformations in pre-industrial work and family relationships; women and slavery; women and religion; women's efforts to reorder their lives and society. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 3 units

HY232 American Women in Industrial Society

Women in American society from 1860 to the present, including Victorian women on the pedestal and in the factory; social and domestic feminism in the progressive era; work in the home; urban women; immigrant and minority women; women in wartime; contemporary feminism. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY236 Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay since Independence

Political independence in the 1810s in La Plata and Chile. The impact of immigration, urbanization, modernization, populism, nationalism, militarism and redemocratization. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

1 unit —

HY238 Colonial Hispano-America

Spanish conquest and administration in New Spain and Peru, the Catholic Church, internal and external colonial economies, the Bourbon reforms and political independence in the 1820s; class, caste and gender during the colonial period. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY240 Foundations of American Constitutionalism and Diplomacy to 1865

(Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Meets AP:A if takem immediately before Political Science 101.

1 unit

HY241 The Emergence of Modern America, 1919-1942

Political liberty, cultural expression, and race relations in the aftermath of WWI; changing sexual and racial relations and the anti-modernist response in the 1920s; the Harlem Renaissance; the causes and consequences of the Great Depression and FDR and the New Deal; the coming of World War II. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: No prerequisite for History majors.

1 unit

HY242 Recent US History, 1943-1973

Domestic politics and political realignments from Truman to Nixon: McCarthyism and the beginnings of the Cold War; covert action and direct intervention in US foreign policy; Civil Rights, Black Power, feminism, and controversies regarding the American family. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 2 units

HY243 Slavery and Antislavery Movements to 1860

African cultural backgrounds, African slavery in colonial British America and the U. S. to 1860; free Black people from 1790 to 1860 and antislavery movements. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY244 Black People in the US since the Civil War

S. since the Civil War. Black Reconstruction; Black urban settlement; literary and artistic movements in the 1920s; civil rights struggles; recent social and political expressions. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY245 Contemporary U.S. History, 1973-2003

American foreign policy from the 'Vietnam Syndrome' to the end of the Cold War to the invasion of Iraq; Americans and the Islamic world; transformations of the Republican and Democratic Parties and the Office of the President; negotiating race in the post-Civil Rights era; the 'New World Order and the new immigration; religion, families, and gender and their roles in partisan politics.

1 unit —

HY249 Women, Children & Men: Families in Historical Perspective

This course treats gender roles and family life throughout the European past, with comparative attention to families of other historical cultures and to relationships within non-human primate communities. It emphasizes the historical agency of women and children generally elided from traditional master narratives of Western Civilization, demonstrating how feminist and ethnohistorical approaches can reveal their experience. Course materials will include historiographical and anthropological literature as well as primary documents, literary works and visual sources. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY250 Social Movements in United States History

This course examines the role of social movements that have strived to achieve social, cultural, political and economic change in the United States. Cases will include movements of the 19th and 20th centuries including antislavery, Populism, nativist movements, workers' movements, the 1960s reform cycle (civil rights, student, and welfare rights movements and feminism), direct action anti-nuclear movements, and the Christian right. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY252 Magic, Science, and Religion in the Mediterranean

How have science and religion come to be seen as such different enterprises? What role has the charge of 'magic' played in setting boundaries between communities as they sought to understand both the workings of the natural world and spiritual revelation? This course examines the intertwined histories of what we now call magic, science, and religion, through Babylonian, Hebrew, Greek, Arabic, and Latin sources, from the ancient through the early modern periods. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY255 Nature & Society

The course examines the interaction between Europeans and the natural world from the Renaissance to the present. It looks at how nature shaped the ways Europeans lived and worked and how, in turn, they thought about and behaved toward nature. In particular, it explores the impact of the Scientific Revolution, industrialization, and mass culture on the changing interplay between nature, society, and culture.

Also listed as Environmental Science 255.

1 unit —

HY256 Education in the West

Educational institutions and their relationship to society from the Renaissance to the present. The rise of mass education and its impact on the structure and purpose of the educational system. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY261 Formation of Islamic Societies

Development of an Islamic world through formation of key institutions of Islamic urban life, the changing relationships of tribal and agrarian societies to urban society, and the differentiation of public and private space. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY262 The Modern Middle East: Freedom and Authorities

Analysis of the variety of lived experiences and questions of freedom and authority in everyday life in the Middle East. Attention to the impact of modernity on gender roles and social order in the Middle East. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY267 The Southwest under Spain and Mexico

The pre-contact history of Anasazi and Athabascan peoples from anthropological and mythological perspectives; the causes and consequences of the Spanish entrada and attempts at missionization of the Indian peoples of New Mexico and the California coast; development of mestizo society; the arrival of the Anglo-Americans and the Mexican-American War. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY268 History of the Southwest since the Mexican War

The adaptation of Native American and Hispanic peoples to Anglo-American culture and politics; the causes and consequences of the loss of Hispanic lands; the evolution of family life and religious practices; indigenous views of modernity. Films, artistic expressions, and works of fiction as well as historical sources. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 268 and Southwest Studies 268.

1 unit —

HY269 The Old South: Settlement, Slavery, Secession

Explores key themes in Southern history from colonial settlement through the American Civil War. Examines the distinctiveness of the American South, and how Southern life was shaped by slavery, particularly in the ways the plantation economy informed Southern political culture, gender and race relations. Other important issues include: Anglo-American encounters with Native Americans, the Great Awakening, the American Revolution, Jeffersonian republicanism, the War of 1812, the Mexican-American War, and the rise of Southern nationalism.

1 unit —

HY270 The New South: Modernity, Race and the Transformation of Southern Life

(Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY271 History of Sex: Traditions

The course analyzes sexual roles and sexual practices in the world before the concept of 'sexual identity' emerged in the late nineteenth century. It examines how different religious traditions, such as Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Christianity, and Buddhism, viewed sex, and explores a wide variety of topics, including pornography, prostitution, and same-sex sexual behavior, throughout the pre-modern world. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Feminist & Gender Studies 271.

1 unit —

HY272 History of Sex: Modernity

The course begins with an examination of the birth of 'sexuality' in late nineteenth-century Europe and then explores the acceptance of and resistance to this new conceptual model throughout the world. Topics include heterosexuality and homosexuality, intersexuality, and 'perversion.' The course concludes with an analysis of the contemporary cultural wars over sexuality in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North and South America. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY274 The Middle Ages: The Making of Europe

The transition from Mediterranean-centered ancient to European-centered medieval civilization. Major cultural developments within the Christian West through the 13th century.

1 unit —

HY275 The Renaissance and the Reformation: Crisis and Dissent

Scientific, religious and artistic achievements of the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY277 Early Modern Europe, 1660-1789

Louis XIV and the Balance of Power; Locke, Voltaire, and the Enlightenment; Frederick the Great and Enlightened Despotism; Wilkes, Jefferson and the beginning of the Democratic Revolutions. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY278 Europe from 1789 to 1848

The French Revolution and Napoleon; the Industrial Revolution and its effect on society; Romanticism; the age of democratic revolution. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY279 Europe from 1848 to 1914

Liberalism and democracy; nationalism and imperialism; industrialism and technology. The Concert of Europe, the balance of power, and the coming of World War I.

1 unit —

HY280 20th Century Europe

The roots and impact of total war, the rise and triumph of Fascism, Reconstruction, the Cold War, European Unification, and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Attention to the development of mass culture and consumer society and to the prospects of democracy throughout Europe. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 2 units

HY283 The Jews in the Modern Europe

The Jews of Poland, Western Europe, and the Islamic world during the 17th century. The Impact of Enlightenment and Assimilation. Hassidism and reform. Anti-Semitism, Zionism, and the American experience. World War I and its consequences: the changing Middle Eastern framework, Communism, Nazism. Israel, and its neighbors, and the world. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

1 unit —

HY286 War and Society since the Middle Ages

The experience of war in Western contexts compared to other major military cultures. Administrative, technical, and ideological contexts of war's evolution as the ultimate test of the cohesion of societies and the viability of nations. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 2 units

HY287 Enlightenment Culture

The course analyzes the origins of 'modernity' in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Beginning with the Scientific Revolution, it then looks at the social and political environment that made the 'Republic of Letters' possible. A wide variety of primary-source texts, including social and political criticism, novels and poetry, painting and sculpture, will be examined. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY288 Intellectual History of Modern Europe: Changes in European thought in the 19th and 20th centuries ex

Woolf, Sartre, Foucault, and others). The relationships between these changes and social developments. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 2 units

HY302 The Invention of History

Herodotus, sometimes called the 'father of lies,' and Thucydides, sometimes called the first political scientist, treated as the first historians. Study of the ways of conceiving history and its relation to the peoples and periods explored. No Greek or Latin required.

Also listed as Classics 221.

1 unit —

HY303 The Uses of the Past: Studies in Philosophy and History

Critical issues in the philosophy of history and historical methodology as seen from the standpoint of the historian and the philosopher. (Offered by individual arrangement.) (Not offered 2013-14).

.5 to 1 unit

HY304 Studies in European Social History

Selected topics in the study of social and ethnic history. Subjects include, for example, ethnic divisions, women, the family, childhood. Specific content and emphasis to be determined by the instructor. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit

HY305 Studies in American Social History

Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY312 Faith, Reason and Medieval Society

Intellectual history in its cultural context from Augustine to Thomas Kempis. Philosophical, theological and historiographical texts.

1 unit —

HY315 Film and History

Examines the representation of history in film. It compares a series of films to major themes and issues in the historiographical literature and raises questions about the ways films should adhere to the academic standards of the historical discipline. Students will read significant debates among cinematic and academic historians and explore the possibilities and limitations of cinematic presentations of history. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY316 History & Literature

An examination of the relationships, both similarities and differences, of history and literature. Using selected theoretical texts from Aristotle to the present, traditional narrative historical texts, experimental histories, fictions based on imagined thoughts and actions of historical figures, and comparisons of historical/biographical texts and historical novels, the course explores the different and/or similar purposes and functions of historical writing and literary writing, and the truth claims of each as forms of narrative and knowledge. In addition, we will read history literally and literature historically in order to interrogate the uses and limitations of both forms of writing. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY317 Modern Central and Eastern Europe

This course will examine the rise, fall, and legacy of the modern German, Austro-Hungarian, Ottoman, and Russian Empires in the lands of Central and Eastern Europe. Important themes will be the struggles over historical memory and national identity within or against continental and imperial paradigms, the complex patterns of resistance and adaptation to foreign domination, and the struggles for national independence. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: History 218 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

HY318 Modern Russia and the Soviet Union

Focus on advanced study of the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Soviet successor states in the 20th century. Topics include the collapse of the Empire during the First World War, the attempted 'building of socialism' in the Soviet period, the crisis of the Soviet system, and how Soviet conceptions of the relation between ethnicity and nationality shaped political and cultural identities.

Prerequisite: History 218 or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

HY319 Modern Central Asia and Eurasia

This course will focus on those regions that stand at the crossroads of European and Asian history, and that are often neglected in traditionally bounded survey courses. Topics will include the patterns of conquest, trade, technological diffusion, and religious conversion across these regions; the effects of Ottoman, Persian, Russian, Chinese, Soviet and Japanese colonialism; and the emergence of independent nations in the 20th century. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: History 218 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

HY330 Colloquium in History and Politics

A junior seminar organized around comparative analysis of a common theme or topic, employing both historical and political science approaches to analysis and research. Designed principally for History/Political Science majors, but others may be admitted with consent of instructors.

Prerequisite: HY/PS Major or consent of instructor.

Also listed as Political Science 330.

1 unit —

HY340 History of Brazil, 1500 to Present

Portuguese colonization, political independence in a neo-colonial economy, the Brazilian Empire, the Republic. The emergence of modern Brazil: populism, corporatism, and militarism. The institution of slavery and its legacy. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

1 unit —

HY344 Modern France and Italy: Fascism, War and Resistance

An examination of the effect of total war, extremism, and economic crisis on politics and society, with special attention to fascism, the resistance, post World War II revival, and to cultural movements such as the avantgarde, futurism, and existentialism. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY362 The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1845-1877

The causes, strategies, and impact of the Civil War on the United States. Slavery; sectional controversy; political crises; civilian and military life during the war; the successes and failures of Reconstruction; the problems of race.

1 unit —

HY364 American Colonies, 1492-1763

The English colonies in America, their founding and development within the British Empire.

1 unit —

HY365 The American Revolution and the Constitution, 1763-1789

The movement for independence and the corollary movement to restructure politics internally, from the end of the Seven Years War through the Revolution and Confederation to the adoption of the U. S. Constitution. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY366 The New Republic, 1789-1844

Initial development of the United States under the Constitution through the Virginia dynasty and Jacksonian democracy. Party formation; conflicts in political economy; diplomacy; expansion; social and cultural growth. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY369 Industrial America, 1877-1919

The United States as it moves from a rural, provincial nation to an industrial world player. Immigration, industrialization, foreign affairs, political and cultural reform provide the focus of the course. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY384 Cultural and Social History of China

Chinese ways of life and thought and the interaction of local social patterns with government and elite ideals. Focuses on the last great dynasty, the Qing. With Emphasis on Writing. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

HY393 Germany since 1918: Dissolution and Reunification

From Empire to Republic. Weimar: promise and fulfillment. Left and Right in postwar Germany. The use of National Socialism. The Twelve-Year Reich. Defeat, reorganization and reunification: two Germanys, then one.

1 unit —

HY399 Junior Seminar: Studying History

An examination of traditional and new methods of studying the past and an exploration of the debate over the nature and the meaning of history. Designed primarily for history majors, but others may be admitted with the consent of the department.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & Junior standing.

1 unit —

HY406 Research Workshop

Students learn how to develop a research topic, advanced library and primary document research, and historical research design and organization. Students meet regularly to discuss their work in progress. Usually, a central text is also discussed throughout the semester. (Semester-long extended format course.) (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & Declared Major.

.5 unit

HY409 Directed Readings in History:

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & 3 units of History.

1 unit —

HY410 Senior Seminar

An advanced seminar on selected topics and themes in historical study.

Prerequisite: History 399, consent of instructor and senior standing.

1 unit —

HY420 Senior Essay

Independent, primary source research. Particular content and emphasis of the paper to be determined in consultation with supervising professor. To be taken in the block immediately following HY 410.

Prerequisite: History 399 and 410 consent of instructor, senior standing.

1 unit —

HY424 History-Political Science Thesis

An interdisciplinary, primary source-based thesis on a subject of interest to the student. Independent study format with regular consultation between the student and the faculty supervisors.

Prerequisite: Consent of both departments.

2 units —

HY425 History-Philosophy Thesis

An interdisciplinary, primary-source based thesis on a subject of interest to the student and approved by two faculty supervisors, one in Philosophy and one in History. Independent study format with regular consultation between the student and the faculty supervisors.

Prerequisite: Consent of both faculty supervisors and registration in Philosophy 425 in the same academic year. Both courses must be completed at some point during blocks 1-6 or the senior year.

1 unit —

HY430 Senior Thesis

Prerequisite: 399, 410, consent of instructor, senior standing.

1 unit —

HY431 Senior Thesis

Directed reading and preparation of a thesis.

Prerequisite: 399, consent of instructor, senior standing.

1 unit —

Political Science

PS101 What is Politics? Examines enduring themes in political life

Questions explored include the balance between state authority and individual liberty; analogies between the exercise of power in government and other areas of human life; the nature of ethical judgment in governance; and the varying ways in which constitutional regimes give expression to and tame the exercise of power. (Formerly 201 Political Analysis.) (Cannot be taken after 103.)

Prerequisite: No credit after 103.

1 unit —

PS103 Western Political Traditions

A survey of the experiences and ideas that have shaped political life in the West. Treatment of selected periods and political philosophies from Ancient Greece through the 20th century. The foundations and development of liberal-democratic thought, together with critiques of, and alternatives to, liberal-democratic thought and practice. Focus on the constitutional democracy of the United States. (Cannot be taken after PS 101.) (Offered as an FYE course.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: No credit after Political Science 101.

1 to 3 units

PS115 Concepts of Freedom From Ancient to Modern Times

This interdisciplinary course explores enduring questions in the Western tradition: What does it mean to be free? What are the basic ideas of freedom that figure prominently in the Western tradition? What is freedom for? Is there a rational use of freedom? Discussion will spring from readings in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy, politics, religion and literature, and complementary films. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

Also listed as English 115.

2 units —

PS123 Race in America: A Conversation

(Not offered 2013-14).

.5 unit

PS150 Fundamental Debates on the Common Good

A major controversy in the history of Western political philosophy has been over the foundation and aims of political rule. Crucial to this debate is the question of the character and limits of a 'common good,' and indeed, the question whether such a good can even exist. Basic but competing perspectives, drawn from ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary texts, will be examined, and stress will be placed on how the question of the 'common good' continues to animate political debate, as well as on its potential for shaping a student's moral and political outlook. (Offered as an FYE course.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

2 units —

PS200 American Politics and Government

The structure and process of United States national politics and government. Special attention to the ideas and values, institutions, and political processes that shape contemporary public policies in this country.

1 unit —

PS202 United States Environmental Politics

Studies environmental politics in the United States from the early twentieth century through the present. Follows changing environmental policies at the federal level and investigates the environmental movement, the greening of industry, and the role of state and local governments in environmental regulation. Illuminates the diversity of approaches to environmental protection taken by different political actors in the U.S., the major debates that have arisen regarding the environment over the past century, and the political challenges and opportunities that mark environmental politics today. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS203 Topics in Politics:

Also listed as Dance Theory 200 and Feminist & Gender Studies 206 and General Studies 222 and General Studies 233 and Theatre 200.

1 unit —

PS204 Topics in Politics: The Prison-Industrial Complex

An examination of shifting notions of crime and punishment in the United States and their political and social consequences. Primary focus on the growing incarceration rate, emerging corrections practices and philosophies, the rise of privatization and emergence of a 'revolving door' prison economy. (Not offered 2013-14).

.5 to 1 unit

PS205 Foundations of Political Economy

Examines enduring themes of Political Economy with a focus on the balance between individual liberty, state authority, regulation of economic activity and the relation of the polity to economy.

1 unit —

PS209 Introduction to International Relations

Introduction to the theory and practice of the contemporary state system. Emphasis on the last hundred years of inter-state rivalry.

Prerequisite: Either 209 or 225 can be counted towards the PS and IPE majors, but not both.

1 unit —

PS210 The Law & Social Justice

Analysis of significant and controversial Supreme Court decisions on issues such as racism and the legacy of slavery, school desegregation, affirmative action, gender discrimination, sexual harassment, the right to an abortion, criminal law, freedom of speech, and the separation of church and state. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS211 Women, Government and Public Policy

Examines the relationship between women, government, and public policy -- with the primary goal of understanding how politics is gendered. Topics include the 'waves' of feminism, how female lawmakers navigate the electoral and legislative arenas, and the role of gender in public policy. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS212 The Civil Rights Movement

A survey of the Civil Rights Movement from the Montgomery bus boycott of 1955 to the assassination of Martin Luther King in Memphis in 1968. Particular emphasis on the enduring legal, political, and social effects of the movement. (Not offered 2013-14).

.5 unit

PS213 Leadership in Theory and Practice

Introduction to models and theories of leadership. Analysis of skills, styles and abilities that are frequently associated with effective leadership in political and organizational settings. Analysis of the paradoxes of leadership and the tensions among leadership, democracy, and creativity.

1 unit —

PS225 Conduct of American Foreign Policy

Ideas and Institutions which condition the formulation and execution of the nation's foreign policy.

Prerequisite: Either 209 or 225 can be counted towards the PS and IPE majors, but not both.

1 unit —

PS226 Gender & Politics

Examines the following questions: Are there politically relevant differences between the sexes, and if so, are they the product of nature and/or convention? What is/ought to be the relation between the political community and private attachments? How has liberalism answered these questions? How does consideration of gender challenge liberal theories such as contract, individual rights, and human nature? Readings in both political theory and in feminist literature.

Also listed as Feminist & Gender Studies 226.

1 unit —

PS227 20th Century Japan

This course will trace the social, political, and cultural developments in Japan from the first Parliamentary elections in 1890 to the current fiscal crisis in the 1990s. Using a wide range of sources, students will explore major themes in Japan's empire, World War, economic miracle, and troubled role as Asian leader. Major themes will include cross-cultural contact, world systems, and women's history. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS231 Political Campaigning

Student internships in primary and general elections. Post-campaign written analysis required. (Offered as an independent study.)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & may be arranged any block.

.5 to 1 unit —

PS233 Governmental Participation

Directed internships in national, state and local government agencies. Written analysis of the work experience required. (Offered as an independent study.)

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & may be arranged any block.

.5 to 1 unit —

PS234 Freedom and Empire: The Drama of Ancient Politics

Examines ancient politics, from the struggle for freedom to the temptations of empire, insofar as it is vividly portrayed in Shakespeare and the classical literature of Greece and Rome: the greatness, challenges and defects of the ancient republic; the nature of political and military ambition; and the causes and character of empire. Focus/possible works: Shakespeare's Roman plays; the Socratic Xenophon's novel on the rise and rule of Cyrus the Great; Tacitus on Roman emperors. The course may also draw upon Machiavelli on Rome. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS236 Introduction to Comparative Politics

This course introduces the concepts, definitions, theories and scholarly approaches used to study comparative politics with reference to selected case studies in different regions of the world.

1 unit —

PS242 Conservatism & Liberalism

Examination of leading conservative and liberal thinkers in America since 1945.

1 unit —

PS243 Southeast Asian Politics

By providing an overview of states and societies in pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial Southeast Asia, this course aims to make sense of key forces which have shaped the region's diverse political systems today-the military juntas in Burma and Thailand, the socialist regime in Vietnam, single party dominant systems in Singapore and Malaysia, and multiparty presidential systems in Indonesia and the Philippines. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS246 Politics in Literature

Reading and discussion of classic and contemporary works of fiction and drama known both for their literary merit and for their insight into politics. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS248 Environmental Politics of Agriculture

This course focuses on the historical and contemporary processes of environmental change and agrarian transformation as a result of resource scarcity, scientific progress, and capitalist development. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS253 Introduction to International Development

Drawing on politics, economics, sociology and anthropology, this course critically examines the First World's relations with the Third World through the lens of 'development.'

1 unit —

PS254 Democracy & Justice

(Not offered 2013-14).

.5 unit

PS265 Religion and Politics

Difficulties in determining the proper relations between religion and politics continuously provoke heated debate within American politics. This course examines a variety of philosophic approaches to the problem. We begin with a careful consideration of the classical liberal democratic solution of separating church and state, and then turn to a variety of contemporary alternatives - from moderate revisions to radical criticisms. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Cannot be taken after Political Science 270.

1 unit

PS270 Liberty & Equality

Explores the question whether there is a fundamental justification for democratic rule by analyzing diverse defenses and critiques of the claims that democracy is founded on the truth of human equality and best provides for individual liberty.

Prerequisite: No credit if Political Science 298 is taken.

1 unit —

PS272 Cities, Sustainability, and Environmental Justice

Examines the relationship between cities and nature, with a particular emphasis on current efforts by cities around the world to become more environmentally sustainable. Explores the meanings of sustainability in the context of urban areas, and how these meanings differ among cities in the Global North and the Global South. Considers the major political challenges that cities face in their efforts to reduce their environmental impact and ques-tions of environmental justice.

Also listed as Environmental Science 272.

1 unit —

PS290 Foundations of Political Thought

Examines the origins and development of political theory from Plato to Machiavelli. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Meets AP:A if taken immediately before Political Science 101.

1 unit

PS292 American Political Thought

An examination of the political theory of the American founding and its relevance to contemporary political problems.

1 unit —

PS296 The Politics of the Legal Process

Norms and processes of courts and the legal professions. How they shape and are shaped by public policy and political culture. Emphasis given to interpretation of statutes, common law, and the U. S. Constitution. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS298 What is Political Philosophy?

Among the fundamental questions to be raised: How does the perspective of a political philosopher differ from that of an experienced practitioner of politics? What - if anything - makes for a philosophical approach to politics, and what accounts for the differences in approaches and conclusions among various political philosophies? Why have philosophers turned their attention to politics, and why is it the case that, for some political philosophers, a concern for affecting political practice is not the primary interest, nor even a goal, while for others it is?

Prerequisite: No credit if Political Science 270 is taken.

1 unit —

PS301 Europe and its Governments:

A comparative study of the political systems and political cultures of selected European countries with consideration of the history and prospects of European Union.

1 unit —

PS303 The Uses of the Past

Examination of modern philosophies of history since Hegel. Taught as an independent study, extended format or Summer Readings course in accordance with student schedules by arrangement with the instructor. Also fulfills a requirement in the Classics-History-Political Science major. COI.

.5 to 1 unit —

PS304 Political Psychology

An overview of the interdisciplinary field of political psychology. Questions include: 1)Why do people engage in 'evil' behavior; 2)Why is there intergroup conflict; 3)How does the media alter political attitudes; and 4)Why do people make 'irrational' political decisions? To answer these questions we will engage the situationist - dispositionist debate: which shapes political behavior more, the situations in which individuals find themselves, or the psychological dispositions of those individuals?

1 unit —

PS306 Democracy & Markets

A comparative examination of the introduction of democracy and markets in Latin America, Africa, Eastern Europe, and Asia, featuring an analysis of how the contemporary package of neo-liberal policies known as 'the Washington consensus' interacts with political institutions.

1 unit —

PS308 Comparative Politics: Russia

The roots, rise, maturity, and collapse of Soviet Leninism. Addresses implications of the Soviet legacy and contemporary conditions of the post-Soviet political order in Russia and other successor states of the Soviet Union.

1 unit —

PS310 Post-Communist Politics and Literature

Examination of post-communist political and economic changes in Eastern Europe, Central Europe, and Russia following the fall of communism through the lenses of political theory, economic theory, and literature. Exploration of how literature not only reflects and comments on political and economic developments but also enacts them. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: 200 or 300-level literature course in Comparative Literature, English or other literature course; any 100 or 200 level Political Science course; or Consent of Instructor.

1 unit

PS312 Balkan Politics-Disintegration & Rebirth

Focuses on Yugoslavia's disintegration in the 1990's and the subsequent international response. Evaluates theories developed in the fields of international relations and comparative politics that purport to explain events. Places specific focus on the interaction of identity and political institutions. (Not offered 2013-14).

.5 to 1 unit

PS313 The Middle East and North Africa

A comparative study of the internal politics of selected states in the region, with emphasis on the relationship between the religious and political spheres and on the question of democratization. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

1 unit —

PS314 International Politics of the Middle East and North Africa

The re-emergence of the Middle East as a regional subsystem in the 20th Century. The role of foreign powers, the rise and decline of Arabism, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, wars in the Gulf, and the impact of the Islamist movements since 1967. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

1 unit —

PS315 Parties and Voting Behavior

Current philosophies and strategies for victory of the Democratic and Republican parties in the United States. Emphasis on group voting behavior and recent election statistics. (Not open to students who have taken Topics in Politics: Electoral Politics and Voting Behavior.) (Not offered 2013-14).

1 to 2 units

PS318 The American Presidency

Examines and evaluates the institution, the politics and policy impact of the American presidency with special emphasis on theories, models and strategies of presidential leadership.

1 unit —

PS320 The United States Congress

Structure and operation of the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. Emphasis on political organization, the committee system, lobby groups, roll-call analysis, and congressional relations with the executive and the bureaucracy.

1 unit —

PS321 Public Policymaking

Forces shaping public policies and decisions; internal politics of the national bureaucracy, the Presidency and Congress. Applies theories of policymaking to such cases as the environment, race and military affairs.

Also listed as Environmental Science 373.

2 units —

PS322 Russia & the World

(Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS323 Minority Politics

A comparative analysis of the political experience and responses of major ethnic minorities and women to the American political process. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS324 Environmental Law and Policy for Global Commons

Examines the application of international policy and law in the protection of the global commons -- climate, biological diversity, the marine environment and the atmosphere. Considers the major issues -- pollution control, natural resource management, and trade -- and focuses on the international infrastructure and treaties that have been negotiated to regulate the environment -- the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Seas (UNCLOS), the Rio Declaration, the Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol and Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS325 Conduct of American Foreign Policy

Ideas and Institutions which condition the formulation and execution of the nation's foreign policy. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Either Political Science 101, 103 or 104 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

PS326 Japanese Politics

Survey course on the development of modern politics in Japan, from the Meiji Restoration to the contemporary corporatist partnership between the state and the business and financial community. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS327 Modern China

This survey course, covering Chinese history and politics from the Boxer Rebellion and the first Western influences to the successful revolution by the Chinese Communist Party, will provide a basic understanding of Chinese history and politics in the modern era. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS330 Colloquium in History and Politics

A seminar organized around comparative analysis of a common theme or topic, employing both historical and political science approaches to analysis and research. Designed principally for History/Political Science majors, but others may be admitted with consent of instructor.

Prerequisite: HY/PS major or consent of instructor.

Also listed as History 330.

1 unit —

PS331 Comparative Politics: China

The development of Chinese politics, with emphasis on the period of reform and opening to the world after 1976 and the contemporary politics of the People's Republic of China. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit —

PS333 Building The European Union: Integration, Institutions and Politics

(Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: Political Science 101, 103 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

PS335 Latin America I

A comparative overview of theories of political development, and the political culture, institutions, and processes of Latin America. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit —

PS336 Latin America II

Political life of selected major Latin American nations, including the role of the United States. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or Political Science 335.

1 unit —

PS342 Inter-American Relations

International Politics in the Americas during the 20th century. Special focus on contemporary subjects including: foreign debt; economic integration; regional conflicts; drug trafficking and production; and environmental issues. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit —

PS344 Realism and Idealism in Political Philosophy

We examine the meanings of political 'idealism' and 'realism' by focusing on two indispensable works of political philosophy, and on their treatments of human aspirations to justice and to the rule of law. Through interpretation of Rousseau's On the Social Contract (as well as shorter works) and Plato's Republic, we consider how philosophic engagement with political 'idealism' can lead to philosophic 'realism' toward politics.

1 unit —

PS351 State Formation and Social Movements

Examines the historical processes of state formation in the West and elsewhere. Explores reactions from societies, which took the forms of social movements--from peasant rebellions to social revolutions. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS356 Global Environmental Policy

An interdisciplinary analysis of environmental policy formulation and regulation at the international level. Examines the negative impact of human activity upon complex ecosystems and the 'global commons,' and analyses the efficacy of international regimes, such as the Kyoto Protocol. Debates the linkages between environmental change, prosperity, and conceptualizations of security.

1 unit —

PS358 Environment, Health and Security

Focuses on the global dimensions of environmental change, resource scarcity, and their interactions with human health within the domain of political science. Examines the utility of orthodox 'national security' paradigms versus emerging conceptualizations of 'human security.' (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS362 Seminar in Political Science

A year-long lecture series covering a wide variety of contemporary political issues and disputes. (Not offered 2013-14).

.25 unit

PS372 Political Thought Since Nietzsche

Reading of major essays in political thought from Nietzsche to the present including such thinkers as Hannah Arendt, Friedrich Hayek, Pierre Manent, Michael Oakeshott, Leo Strauss and Eric Voegelin.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

PS375 Introduction to International Political Economy

Examination of classic and modern conceptions of political economy. Emphasis on understanding theory and applying it to explain political and economic outcomes within states and among states in the international arena. Open to declared junior International Political Economy majors, and to others with consent of instructor.

Prerequisite: Economics 150 (or 151 and 152).

Also listed as Economics 375.

1 unit —

PS380 Constitutional Law in American Politics

Examines (1) the political and social dynamics and interpretive methods that shape the constitutional decisions of the U. S. Supreme Court, and (2) the political impact of the Court's constitutional decisions and doctrines on political and social conditions. Emphasis given to the shift from judicial concern with governmental structures and powers to the contemporary concern with individual and group rights.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or Political Science 200.

1 unit —

PS396 Foundations of American Constitutionalism and Diplomacy

Emphasizes the intellectual precursors and historical development of the federal union of 1787 and of early American foreign policy. Considers America before the Civil War as a system of states and explores through debates over the American union and early foreign policy a range of theoretical issues in international relations.

Prerequisite: Also listed as History 240.

1 unit —

PS397 Interpretations of American Diplomacy

Examines the rise of the United States to world power in the 20th century and its role in the contemporary international system. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

PS398 Origins of Modern State System: Theory and Practice

Examines the philosophical significance and historical development of thought concerning the relations of states and peoples from the Renaissance to the American and French Revolutions, with attention to thinkers such as Erasmus, Machiavelli, Las Casas, Grotius, Hobbes, Locke, Bolingbroke, Hume, Smith, Burke, Rousseau, Constant, Gentz, Kant, and the American Founding Fathers.

1 unit —

PS399 Theories of the Contemporary International System

Surveys contending theories of the contemporary global system, with attention to topics such as globalization, U.S. hegemony, the just war, the environment, and terrorism.

Prerequisite: Political Science 309, 325 or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

PS402 Independent Research in Political Science

A project normally organized around preparation of a substantial paper. Proposed and carried out at student initiative, under supervision of a department faculty member, in an area in which the student has already completed basic course work. (May also be listed as North American Studies 402 if emphasis is on Canada.)

1 unit —

PS403 Independent Study

1 unit —

PS404 Tutorial in American Politics

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit —

PS408 Tutorial in Political Theory

May be taught as a block course or as an extended format year-long course. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit

PS410 Tutorial in International Relations

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit —

PS412 Tutorial in Comparative Politics

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit —

PS419 Seminar in Political Philosophy:

A semester long intensive study of advanced texts and topics in political philosophy. The seminar takes one of two forms: Morality of Power. Examines various accounts and defenses of the human interest in the pursuit of power; what constitutes power; and the relations among power, political rule, and justice. Philosophy and Politics in Post-modernity. An introduction to radical changes in philosophic thinking and their potential significance for our understanding of American politics and its principles. This introduction will take place, in part, through a debate with a modern approach to philosophy, politics and morals, including a consideration of its possible connection to Nihilism. (Not offered 2013-14).

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

.5 to 1 unit

PS424 History-Political Science Thesis

Prerequisite: Consent of both Departments.

2 units —

PS450 Political Science Thesis

Thesis on a subject chosen by the student with approval from the department. Independent-study format with regular consultation between student and faculty supervisor.

1 unit —

PS470 Tutorial in International Political Economy

Focuses on the historical development and current role of international institutions and multilateral treaties in the regulation of the world economy and environment, with emphasis on the impact of and challenges presented by globalization. Students write a substantial paper exploring some aspect of this interaction, but have considerable freedom in defining their research agenda.

Prerequisite: IPE major or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

PS490 Political Economy Distinction Thesis

Optional for majors in American Political Economy and International Political Economy, upon application to, and approval of, the departments of Political Science and Economics and Business. (Must be taken in conjunction with Economics 491 for a total of 2 units.)

1 to 2 units —