Skip to main content area Skip to institutional navigation Skip to sub-navigation

Anthropology

Anthropology Website

Professor HAUTZINGER, Associate Professor MONTAÑO (chair); Assistant Professors FISH, GÓMEZ, LEZA; Visiting Instructor VONFELDT

Anthropology offers an expansive outlook on human life through time and across space. The anthropology major prepares students for a variety of careers across numerous fields, including but far from limited to academia. Majors are exposed to all four subfields of American anthropology: 1) archaeology, which focuses on the material cultures and peoples of the past; 2) biological anthropology, which examines the evolution of human biology and behavior stressing the influence of culture on evolution; 3) linguistic anthropology, which addresses both the formal complexity of linguistic systems and the role that language plays in the regulating and negotiating of social life; and 4) socio-cultural anthropology, which stresses contemporary peoples, combining ethnography and cross-cultural comparison to portray the variability of human value systems, practices, and organization. 

Major Requirements

Students majoring in anthropology must complete the following requirements:

  1. Two required, discipline-wide courses:
    AN215 Research Design — Method and Theory (taught Block 3)
    AN315 Advanced Integrative Seminar (taught Block 6 and intended as the capstone course for seniors)
  2. An additional 10 units of course work in the department**, distributed in the following categories:
    • A minimum of one course in each of the 4 subfields (archaeological, biological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology)
    • At lease three anthropology courses at the 300-level (in addition to AN315)
      • Note that all 300-level courses have 100-level (and some have 200-level) prerequisites;
      • 2-block courses count as one course, but two units in the major;
      • Up to two ES courses cross-listed with anthropology may count as anthropology units;
      • AN400 Research in Anthropology does not substitute for 300-level courses. 
  3. Writing in anthropology
    • Seniors must submit a writing portfolio as evidence of their progression in the major.

      or

      Students who are eligible may satisfy this requirement by writing an Honors Thesis
      • Honors Thesis eligibility
        • minimum GPA in the major of 3.6
        • faculty thesis advisor approval
        • Honors Thesis proposal accepted by vote of the faculty

**Major requirements may be satisfied by no more than:

  • two units of off-campus credit
  • two units of independent Readings/Research (400), and
  • one cross-listed unit (two units if ES) taught by non-departmental faculty (e.g. folklore, ethnomusicology, cultural ecology).

Note: The department awards Distinction in Anthropology to students who present evidence of distinguished work. Consult the Majors Handbook for Distinction guidelines.

Minor Requirements

A minor in anthropology will consist of a minimum of five units of course work, to include the following:

  • Courses in (at least) two of the four major subdisciplines (biological, cultural, archaeological, and linguistic anthropology) as described in the major requirements.
  • At lease one course at the 300 level.
  • Independent research courses (AN400) may not be counted toward the minimum five units of the minor.
  • Minor requirements may be satisfied by no more than:
    • one cross-listed course unit taught by non-departmental faculty (e.g. folklore, ethnomusicology, cultural ecology)
    • one unit of off-campus credit.

Courses

Anthropology

AN101 Biological Anthropology

A survey of major topics in biological anthropology, including: background material in genetics and evolution, non-human primate behavior, human evolution, and human biological variation. Biocultural evolution emphasized. Occasional laboratory experiences complement lectures, reading, and discussion. (Meets the requirement for Natural Science credit.) (Does not meet the divisional requirement in the Social Sciences or the outside unit requirement for students majoring in the natural sciences. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement.

1 unit —

AN102 Cultural Anthropology

The study of human societies through the central concept of culture. Explores such topics as meaning, adaptation, social organization, kinship, religion, environment, technology and conflict. Presents anthropological themes including holism, comparison, dynamism and cultural relativism, as well as methodological approaches to studying human experience in naturally occurring contexts. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit —

AN103 Introduction to Archaeology

Archaeology is the study of past human societies through material remains. Archaeologists employ multidisciplinary methods to investigate anthropological questions in the past, using evidence provided by objects, buildings, and other material traces. Basic history, methods, theory, and politics of archaeology are presented. Students learn practical skills such as artifact analysis and site mapping as well as the course of human prehistory, from fossil ancestors to ancient states. 1 unit - Van Dyke. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit —

AN104 World Music

Surveys the musical cultures of the world in their social, historical, and theoretical contexts; develops comprehension of the essential philosophies and aesthetics of the music studied and the ability to identify, describe, and discuss various musical styles, compositional forms, and techniques through listening and performance exercises; emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 to 2 units

AN105 Language and Culture

Examines the interconnectedness of language and culture from ethnographic and sociolinguistic perspectives. Comparative study of speaking in cultural context aimed at understanding the ways in which people use talk to cooperate, manipulate, structure events, and negotiate identities. Cross-cultural focus, with examples from such languages as Japanese, Navajo and Apache, African-American Vernacular, and French. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 200 and Film and New Media Studies 104.

1 unit —

AN123 American Sign Language I

Introduction to American Sign Language. Practice in signing and comprehension in American Sign Language (Ameslan or ASL).

.25 unit —

AN124 American Sign Language I

Introduction to American Sign Language. Practice in signing and comprehension in American Sign Language (Ameslan or ASL).

.25 unit —

AN201 Human Evolution

Fossil and genetic evidence for human evolution as well as the implications of evolution for understanding the adaptations of modern humans. Nature and timing of the developments that led from our distant, rodent-like ancestors to humans as we are today. Evolutionary theories that have been proposed to explain these changes. Adaptive significance of changes in the relationship between members of our lineage is also stressed. Through lectures, laboratories, discussions, and student presentations, students learn some of the basic principles of molecular genetics and discuss the use of genetics in evolutionary research. No credit toward Biology major if taken after Biology 231. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Biology 105 or 106 or 107 or 108 or 109 or Anthropology 101.

1 unit

AN202 Human Biological Variation

Beginning with the genetic base, this course provides an anthropological approach to understanding biological variation within and between human populations. Traits of known and unknown inheritance, physiological adaptations, concept of race and interactions of human biology and culture are emphasized. Some laboratory exercises. (Meets the requirement for Natural Science credit.) (Does not meet the divisional requirement in the Social Sciences or the outside unit requirement for students majoring in the Natural Sciences.)

Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

AN203 States and Empires in the Ancient Andes

Andean South America was home to some of the first and most complex societies in the Western hemisphere. People in the Andes built large cities and established states that came to control large areas. This course will focus exclusively on the development and expansion of states and empires in the pre-Columbian Andes, concentrating attention on Moche, Wari, Tiwanaku and the Inka. Emphasis will be placed on the use of ceremonial and monumental architecture, the development of pristine states, urbanism, and imperial expansion. No credit if taken after AN 207: Prehistory of the Andes. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

.5 unit

AN204 Prehistory:

Human habitation of a single continent or other major areas from earliest times, with emphasis on human interaction with environment. Changes in cultural patterns over time as manifested in the archaeological record. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

AN207 Primate Behavior, Ecology and Conservation

An overview of the relationships between different groups of primates and their natural history provides a foundation for investigating current hypotheses regarding the evolution of primate behaviors. The influence of the environment on behaviors is explored and its application for modeling the behaviors of humans and our hominin ancestors will be discussed. Finally, conservation threats to primates and primate traits that reduce or promote survival in human-altered habitats will be examined. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.

1 unit —

AN208 Topics in Anthropology:

Courses taught occasionally by visiting professors or by permanent faculty. Topics will vary from year to year.

Also listed as Music 221 and Music 291 and Music 295 and Asian Studies 200 and Asian Studies 295 and Southwest Studies 291.

1 unit —

AN209 Topics in Anthropology:

Courses taught occasionally by visiting professors or by permanent faculty. Topics will vary from year to year. (Not offered 2014-15).

.5 to 2 units

AN211 The Culture Area:

Culture history and contemporary ethnic relations in geographic regions of non-Western areas of the world or of minority groups in the Western world. Areas offered vary; examples: native cultures of the Pacific Islands, the Arctic, Meso-America, North American Indians, etc. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit —

AN215 Research Design: Method and Theory

Research design, method and theory across the discipline of anthropology. Topics include selecting research problems and sites, engaging literature, data-gathering and analysis, Institutional Review Board approval and ethical issues. Theory and application of contrasting paradigms (i.e. positivist, interpretivist) across each of the four major subfields. Emphasizes commonalities across the discipline in major theoretical currents (i.e. cultural ecology, functionalism, symbolic, historical materialism, postmodernism, feminism, and practice theory).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 101, 102, 103 or 105 or consent of instructor.

Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 215.

1 unit —

AN217 Precolumbian Civilizations of Mesoamerica

Survey of the archaeologically known cultures of Mesoamerica, which include some of archaeology's most celebrated subjects of study, the Olmecs, Mayans and Aztecs. Students will learn the history and geography of the region, the nature of sociopolitical and cultural developments in the region, the material culture distinctive of different times and places within the region and key issues and debates of ongoing concern. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 to 2 units

AN218 The Archaeology of the African

Explores the diverse range of the African diaspora in the Americas through an archeological lens. An important goal is to see how scholars have creatively engaged with available resources (material remains, ethnohistoric accounts, historical records, oral texts) to increase our understanding of the life conditions of various African-based societies and communities in the Caribbean, Latin America, and the United States. Special emphasis on the theories, frameworks, and methods employed for understanding a race and ethnicity. (Not offered 2013-14).

1 unit

AN219 The Archaeology of the American Southwest

An introduction to the cultures of the American Southwest, from the initial populations of the greater region through the wrenching contact of European conquistadores. With occupation beginning sometime before 12,000 years ago, we have evidence for social and ritual complexity in the archaeological record dating before 2000 B.C.E. Current archaeological research in the American Southwest is redefining our concept of the adoption of agriculture in North America, our view of historically defined culture areas( Hohkam, Salado, Mogollon, Sinagua, Anasazi) with the probability of complex multiethnic communities, and the Southwest's former position as a region defining American archaeological method and theory. Course begins with a historical review of Southwestern archaeology and moves on to the current methodological and theoretical issues. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN221 Topics in Ethnomusicology:

Special topics in ethnomusicology, approached through emphasis on a particular musical area, theoretical issue, genre or repertory, compositional technique, or instrument. The course is devoted to non-western musical cultures.

1 unit —

AN222 Topics in Ethnomusicology:

Special topics in ethnomusicology, approached through emphasis on a particular musical area, theoretical issue, genre or repertory, compositional technique, or instrument. The course is devoted to non-western musical cultures. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN230 Introduction to Archaeology

Archaeology is the multi-disciplinary quest for knowledge about ourselves and our human past. This course provides students with an initial exposure to modern archaeology. A brief survey of the history of the field provides a background to understanding the relationship between the 'why' and the 'how' of archaeology. Basic methodologies are explored. Theoretical bases for the major kinds of archaeology carried out today provide a good key to understanding how they differ in specific goals. Effective record keeping is emphasized as it is the means to archaeological success. Prehistory is the end product of archaeological research involving analysis, synthesis, and interpretation. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN237 Blacks in the Caribbean and Latin America

Compares the experiences of diverse groups of the African Diaspora, with special emphasis on the Caribbean basin and Brazil. Topics include: race, racism and nation-building; the legacy of slavery and contemporary labor processes, conceptualizing the 'Africa' in African-American cultures; variable social constructions of racial categories; maroons and other communities of resistance; and several African-American religions (Candomble, Umbanda, Voudoun, Santeria, Rastafarianism). Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN238 Gender and Class in Latin America

Introduces anthropological perspectives on gender and class dynamics, including South and Central America along with the Hispanophone Caribbean. Readings center on women's role in production, reproduction, and development, while also incorporating specific approaches to masculinity and men's social roles. Emphasizes ethnographic analyses in which class and gender are treated as interconnected categories. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Feminist & Gender Studies 238.

1 unit —

AN239 Women, Men, and 'Others:' Gender Cross-Culturally

A cross-cultural approach to gender, emphasizing variability in the ways gender shapes social interaction and organization. After addressing the relationship between biological sex and culturally constructed gender and diverse sex-gender systems, the course proceeds to closely examine non-binary gender systems, where 'third' (or more) genders emerge: hijras in India, berdaches in diverse Native American peoples, and travestis in Brazil. Various anthropological and feminist theoretical frameworks are applied. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN242 The Anthropology of Food

This course will explore food concepts, analytical methods, and the food habits of different ethnic groups. The class will have a field trip to the San Luis Valley, and to Northern New Mexico to document the production of food among farmers, cattle ranchers and restaurateurs. (Limited to 12 students.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 200.

1 unit —

AN243 Hispanic Folklore of the Southwest

(with Emphasis on Writing). This course is designed to introduce students to several approaches in folklore studies and to Mexican material culture, religion, music, and prose narratives in the Southwest region of the United States. We will examine how the different approaches used by historians, literary critics, anthropologists, and folklorists can enhance the study of Hispanic folklore and material culture. (Limited to 12 students.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit —

AN245 Popular Culture

This course will present students with different concepts related to popular culture, as exemplified by diverse cultural forms: film, music, literature, and material culture. Through the course students will become acquainted with the theories of structuralism and post-structuralism, Marxism, feminism, and post-modernism. These theories will allow students to develop a clear understanding of the different paradigms and their limitations in cultural studies. (Not offered 2014-15).

.5 unit

AN251 The Study of Folklore I

A survey of the main forms of folklore, with emphasis on definition, identification, and collection of traditional oral forms (tales, legends, myths, ballads, beliefs, jokes, riddles, etc.) Includes a collecting project designed to introduce students to the traditional expressions of ethnic or other cultural groups. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN256 Language Socialization

Explore the ways new speakers of a language are socialized through the process of language acquisition to become culturally competent members of their communities. Examine how individuals are taught the knowledge, skills, and attitudes expected in their particular cultural and speech communities. Focus will be placed on the process of language socialization for children learning the languages of their native communities, but the course will also explore issues of language socialization for foreign language learners. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit —

AN258 Introduction to Linguistics

Explores the structures and functions of languages throughout the world, seeking to uncover both shared and variable patterns across languages. Introduces the tools of modern linguistics for recording and analyzing sound systems, words, syntactic and semantic structures, and the communicative uses of language. Provides background for understanding contemporary issues relating to language. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN260 Language & Gender

Explores how language is used by women and men in sociocultural context. Examines and critiques anthropological and sociolinguistic research on the relationship of language and gender. Readings provide a cross-cultural perspective and students collect and analyze samples of language use in their own speech community.

1 unit —

AN262 Theory and Methods in Linguistic Anthropology

Introduction to basic research methods and the theoretical development of research methodologies applied in the field of linguistic anthropology. In addition to learning basic interviewing, recording and participant observation techniques applied by linguistic anthropologists, students will be introduced to digital technologies for transcription and linguistic data analysis. Students will collaborate on a small research project to gain experience with the research techniques and technologies. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or 105 or 258 or 260 or Consent of the Instructor.

1 unit

AN291 Southwest American Indian Music

Music and culture of Southwest American Indians, with emphasis on Pueblo and Athabascan peoples. Considers origins narratives, cosmology, ritual drama, dance, and other aesthetic modes as related to Southwest Indian musical performance. Addresses traditional as well as new music. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN294 Latino Musics of the United States

Explores the role of music in the expression of ethnicity and ethnic identity among Latino peoples of the United States. Various musical styles and genres performed by New Mexicans, Texas-Mexicans, Puerto Rican Americans, and Cuban Americans are considered. Traditional and popular Latino musics are examined within their cultural and historical contexts. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN295 Indonesian Music

Surveys Indonesian history, culture, society, religion, and aesthetic values through music. Students become familiar with a variety of Indonesian musical repertories, styles, and performance contexts, including court traditions of Java, Sunda, and Bali and village traditions throughout the Indonesian archipelago. Traditional as well as new music are discussed. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN301 Human Osteology

This lab-based course is a detailed study of the anatomy of the human skeleton as a dynamic, living system. Special emphasis will be placed on the interpretation of skeletal remains from archaeological and forensic contexts. Consideration is given to the growth, structure, and function of bones, and to bioarchaeological and forensic aspects such as the determination of age, sex, stature, and pathology from skeletal remains. We will combine theory, its applications, and the limitation of osteological methods with laboratory analysis. The relevant techniques for the reconstruction of past populations and the assessment of human biological variation will be introduced. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World lab or field requirement.

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 202, statistics suggested.

1 unit —

AN306 Primatology

Social structure and behavior of various non-human primates. Contrasts made between behavior as free-living forms in natural habitats and in captivity. Physiological characteristics and environmental adjustments of primates explored. Inferences about social life of earliest humans made from behavior of contemporary non-human primates. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or consent of instructor, statistics recommended.

1 to 3 units

AN308 Topics in Anthropology:

Problems on the frontier of anthropology or on the frontiers between anthropology and other disciplines. Examples may be primitive government or religion, cognition, folklore, cultural ecology. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.

Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 102 or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

AN309 Topics in Anthropology:

Problems on the frontier of anthropology or on the frontiers between anthropology and other disciplines. Examples may be primitive government or religion, cognition, folklore, cultural ecology. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 102 or consent of instructor.

1 to 2 units

AN310 Anthropology and the History of Ideas

The intellectual history of sociocultural anthropology will form the foundation of this course. It will discuss the ideas and intellectuals who contributed to the development of anthropology as a scholarly discipline and will consider the following theoretical perspectives: evolutionism, functionalism, historical particularism, cultural materialism, and interpretive approaches. Also, it will examine field research strategies that shaped anthropology.

Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor.

Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 310.

1 unit —

AN311 Language in Culture and Mind: Cognitive Anthropology

Explores cognitive anthropology, which is concerned with the relationship between language and mind, how cultural worlds are created and structured through language, and how individual languages shape the attitudes and behaviors of their speakers. We will consider both potential universals in human thought as expressed through language and the diversity of worldviews and behaviors between language communities. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 103, 204, 320 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

AN312 The Language of Racism

Focuses on the language of racism across cultures, examining the nature of discourses that communicate and reproduce racist ideologies. A special focus will be placed on racist discourse in the United States, New Zealand, and certain societies of Latin America. We will examine the structures and effects of a range of racist discourses, from the extreme discourses of 'white pride' organizations to the everyday language of covert racism. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN315 Advanced Integrative Seminar

Focuses on a single topic examined from the perspective of multiple subfields of anthropology, including, but not limited to violence; warfare; domestication; evolution; expressive culture; gender, race and ethnicity; social complexity or globalization. Team-taught by faculty from distinct anthropological subfields.

Prerequisite: Anthropology 215 or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

AN317 The Anthropology of Place-Making

Covers a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches in anthropology that relate to studies and interpretations of place making. Encourages wide-ranging curiosity about the social construction of places and spaces, from small-scale structures to large-scale landscapes. Involves close readings and critical discussions of written works that analyze the ways in which people use spaces and places (such as rooms, buildings, street grids, fields, or regions) to articulate social relations.

Prerequisite: Any 100 level anthropology course.

1 unit —

AN318 The Archaeology of Colonial Entanglements

Explores the multifaceted nature of colonial encounters between Europeans and indigenous people, using the Americas as the geographical focus. Special attention to the analytical and theoretical discourse shaping anthropological approaches to colonialism through the topics of material culture, gender, ideology, ethnicity, race, identity, labor, class, and resistance. Readings and discussions will draw on data and perspectives from ethno-history, historical archaeology, and cultural anthropology to tackle the simultaneously global ad local nature of colonialism. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

AN320 Field Archaeology

Design, implementation, analysis and interpretation of archaeological field research. Students construct a research design and spend four weeks collection archaeological data in the field. Field techniques may include survey, mapping, artifact analysis, and excavation. Upon return to campus, students complete analysis and produce a written report detailing the results of their research. (Also listed SW 320.) (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 103 or consent of instructor.

1 to 2 units

AN321 Rio Grande - Culture, History and Region

An interdisciplinary course based on history, culture, and water issues. It will explore the cultural heritage and creativity of groups whose historical experience has been shaped by the Rio Grande basin from its origin in Colorado to its mouth in the Gulf of Mexico. The course will engage a broad American and international public in the exploration of how the river basin and the people who live within it change, evolve, and develop together, and can affect each other. Limited to 12 students. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor.

2 units

AN324 Archaeologies of Landscape

Ancient places were imbued with values, histories, and meanings that can tell archaeologists about many things, including political authority, social identity, and ritual practices. This course considers current theoretical and methodological approaches to the reconstruction of past social landscapes emerging from within archaeology, anthropology, and geography. Diverse landscapes are examined from the across the ancient world. Field trip to archaeological landscapes in the Southwest. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 103 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

AN326 Religion & Ritual

Introduction to the comparative study of religion based on anthropological research among native peoples and folk traditions. Topics may include: shamanism, peyotism, witchcraft, the genesis of religious cults, syncretism of native religions with major religious traditions, ritual processes. Consideration of major cultural theories arising from the study of religion and ritual. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

AN329 Readings in Anthropology:

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit —

AN331 Evolution, Science, and Society

Traces the development of evolutionary thought and its impacts beyond the scientific community. The nature of science, scientism, and scientific fundamentalism will be examined and the political, religious, and ethical implications of these views will be discussed. This course also explores the history of anti-intellectual traditions and the conditions under which creationist and anti-science movements have developed in both the US and abroad. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 202 or 203, or consent of instructor.

1 unit

AN333 Evolution of Human Life Histories

Life history theory examines how the “decisions” that individuals make at different life stages impact their survival and reproductive success. Information from studies of human evolution, modern human biology, human ecology, and primate behavior will be used to model the evolution of human life histories. Life history strategies involving sexual behaviors, reproductive biology, investment in offspring, childhood, and adolescence will be investigated in order to identify traits that are uniquely human and when these traits may have first appeared in the human lineage. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or 202 or 203, or consent of instructor.

1 unit

AN360 Historical Linguistics

Introduces the principles of language change and linguistic reconstruction. Topics include mechanisms of change, sociocultural factors favoring the spread of changes, and methods for determining linguistic relationships. Considers reconstruction of an unattested language and possible inferences about the environment and culture of its speakers. Examples and problems from a wide range of families, including Indo-European, Austronesian, Bantu, Sino-Tibetan, and languages of native North America. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 258 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

AN361 Grammar in Global Perspective

Investigates grammatical structures and their uses in a wide range of languages. Comparison of the varying ways in which meaning is encoded in grammar in languages of the Americas, Asia, Africa, the Pacific, and Europe. Emphasis on analysis and identification of recurring cross-linguistic patterns in morphology, syntax, and semantics. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 258 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

AN371 Culture Contact and Writing Cultures

This course will incorporate the work of anthropology and cultural studies to introduce students to how foreign cultures were experienced and represented by travelers, explorers, colonial administrators and anthropologists and will focus on forms of writing associated with conquest and colonialism. Students will then be introduced to the travel and tourism genre of representation and will analyze travel writing as cultural politics and the politics of tourism. The course will conclude with an examination of the new ethnography and writing cultures. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

AN372 Language, Ideology and Power

Examines the relationship between language, worldview and structures of power in society. Students will be introduced to contemporary theory on 'language ideologies,' addressing their development, and how they create and sustain certain relations of power in a society. The course will further explore how individuals and groups negotiate power through the manipulation of existing, conventionalized language practices. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 101 or 102 or Consent of Instructor.

1 to 2 units

AN376 Culture and Power: Political Anthropology

A comparative, holistic study of formal and informal politics in diverse societies. The course focuses on three major themes: examining diverse political systems with emphasis on the emergence of the state; the relationship between power, ideology, and symbolic systems; power and controlling processes, with special attention to dominance, hegemony and resistance. Emphasis on full-length ethnographies.

Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor.

1 unit —

AN377 Living in the Material World--Economic Anthropology

Examines how people organize their material world to survive and to create meaningful systems of value. A variety of economic forms - small-scale societies with limited accumulation, gift economics, and commodity-based capitalism - are considered from a holistic, comparative perspective. The course concludes with as anthropological critique of colonialism, core-periphery relations, diverse forms of 'capital,' and globalization. This one-block course prepares interested students for a follow-up field course. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: 102 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

AN380 Community-Based Field Course

An opportunity for students to engage in team-based, applied anthropological work on a focused project, this course is intended as a linked block that follows up advanced coursework in such areas of study as food, religion and ritual, political, economic, NAGPRA issues, or museum curatorial work. Sites for field-work will vary from year to year, but generally will be grounded in the Rocky Mountain West and/or Southwest Regions. Incorporates such hands-on activities as participant observation, interviewing, policy development and/or collections management, as well as training in qualitative and/or quantitative data analysis. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Corresponding 300-level course or consent of instructor.

1 unit

AN400 Research in Anthropology

Student research projects, either independent or in collaboration with ongoing faculty research, based on field, laboratory or library research. Projects must be approved at least one block in advance of the actual block of research.

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

1 unit —